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Enceladus

This map reveals never-before-seen details of warm fractures that branch off like split ends from the ends of the main trenches of two 'tiger stripes.'
The thermal data came from Cassini's composite infrared mapping spectrometer during an Aug. 13, 2010, flyby of Enceladus. Scientists overlaid the data on a background map of that region made from Cassini images taken in July 2005.
A crescent of Enceladus appears dimly illuminated in front of the bright limb of Saturn.
This view looks toward the night side of Saturn, which occupies the lower half of the image. Enceladus, in the center of the image, is closer to the spacecraft than the planet is in this view. Sunlight scatters through the planet's atmosphere and forms the bright diagonal line running from the left to right of the image.














Tethys

The northern hemisphere of Saturn's moon Tethys is seen in this polar stereographic map, mosaicked from the best-available images obtained by NASA's Cassini spacecraft.
The map is centered on the north pole, and surface coverage extends to the equator. Grid lines show latitude and longitude in 30-degree increments. The scale, in the full-size versions of the map, is 293 meters (960 feet) per pixel.
The southern hemisphere of Saturn's moon Tethys is seen in this polar stereographic maps, mosaicked from the best-available images obtained by NASA's Cassini spacecraft.
The map is centered on the south pole, and surface coverage extends to the equator. Grid lines show latitude and longitude in 30-degree increments. The scale in the full-size versions of these maps is 293 meters (960 feet) per pixel. The mean radius of Tethys used for projection of these maps is 536.3 kilometers (333.2 miles).
The large Penelope Crater is shown in the lower right of the south pole map, in the southern latitudes of the hemisphere of Tethys that faces backward in its orbit around Saturn.

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