Smiling kids in front of picture of Titan
Source: NASA/JPL
Published: August 2, 2017

This contest is now closed. The Cassini Scientist for a Day contest challenges students to become NASA scientists studying Saturn. Participants examine three possible observations taken by the Cassini spacecraft and are tasked to choose the one they think will yield the best scientific results. This choice must then be supported in essay. The contest meets U.S. National English and Science Education Standards.

Which to choose

Topic 1: Enceladus' Plumes

Enceladus
This two-image mosaic is one of the highest resolution views acquired by Cassini during its imaging survey of the geyser basin capping the southern hemisphere of Saturn's moon Enceladus.

Bursting at the Seams: the Geyser Basin of Enceladus

Dramatic plumes, both large and small, spray water ice and vapor from many locations along the famed "tiger stripes" near the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus. The tiger stripes are four prominent, approximately 84-mile- (135-kilometer-) long fractures that cross the moon's south polar terrain.

This two-image mosaic is one of the highest resolution views acquired by Cassini during its imaging survey of the geyser basin capping the southern hemisphere of Saturn's moon Enceladus.

Topic 2: Titan's Lakes

Titan's Lakes
A mosaic of nine processed images acquired during Cassini's first very close flyby of Saturn's moon Titan on Oct. 26, 2004.

Hovering Over Titan

A mosaic of nine processed images acquired during Cassini's first very close flyby of Saturn's moon Titan on Oct. 26, 2004, constitutes the most detailed full-disc view of the mysterious moon.

The images that comprise the mosaic have been processed to reduce the effects of the atmosphere and to sharpen surface features.

Topic 3: Saturn's Hexagon

Saturn's Hexagon
Saturn's north pole seen in natural color.

Painted Lines

The globe of Saturn, seen here in natural color, is reminiscent of a holiday ornament in this wide-angle view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft. The characteristic hexagonal shape of Saturn's northern jet stream, somewhat yellow here, is visible. At the pole lies a Saturnian version of a high-speed hurricane, eye and all.

ENLARGE

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