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DS2
Deep Space 2 Mission to Mars

Goals: The Mars Microprobe Mission - Deep Space 2 - was intended to test new technologies and search for water ice in the south pole soil of Mars. The twin micropobes hitched a ride aboard Mars Polar Lander.

Accomplishments: None. Both the lander probes were lost during the when Mars Polar Lander crashed on Mars in December 1999.


Key Dates
Status: Unsuccessful
Fast Facts
DS2 Facts Both Deep Space 2 microprobes weighed a total of only 6.5 kg (14.3 pounds)

They were named Amundsen and Scott (right) in honor of the first explorers to reach Earth's South Pole in 1911.

The probes were designed to survive and impact of up to 644 kp/h (400 mph).
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Chris Voorhees Chris Voorhees
"Each robot is the culmination of the combined hopes and dreams of each of the people who worked on it. There are many souls in each great machine." Read More...
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Last Updated: 24 Nov 2010