There are many upcoming eclipses across the world. This chart provides when and where these eclipses will occur, as well as scientific details about the eclipses.

Date Type UTC of Greatest Eclipse [1] Saros Series [2] Eclipse Magnitude (Solar) &
Umbral Magnitude (Lunar) [3]
Longest Duration of Eclipse Totality or Annularity [4] Geographic Region of Eclipse Visibility [5]
2022
Apr 30 Partial Solar 20:42:36 119 0.64 - Pacific, South America
May 16 Total Lunar 4:12:42 131 1.414 1 hour, 25 min. Americas, Europe, Africa
Oct 25 Partial Solar 11:01:19 124 0.862 - Europe, Africa, Middle East, Asia
Nov 08 Total Lunar 11:00:22 136 1.359 1 hour, 25 min. Asia, Australia, Pacific, Americas
2023
Apr 20 Hybrid Solar 4:17:55 129 1.013 1 min., 15 sec. Asia, Australia, Philippines
[Hybrid: Indonesia, Australia, Papua New Guinea]
May 05 Penumbral Lunar 17:24:05 141 -0.046 - Africa, Asia, Australia
Oct 14 Annular Solar 18:00:40 134 0.952 5 min., 17 sec. North America, Central America, South America
[Annular: United States, Mexico, Belize, Honduras, Panama, Colombia, Brazil]
Oct 28 Partial Lunar 20:15:18 146 0.122 1 hour, 17 min. Americas, Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia
2024
Mar 25 Penumbral Lunar 7:13:59 113 -0.132 - Americas
Apr 08 Total Solar 18:18:29 139 1.057 4 min., 28 sec. North America
[Total: Mexico, United States, Canada]
Sep 18 Partial Lunar 2:45:25 118 0.085 1 hour, 3 min. Americas, Europe, Africa
Oct 02 Annular Solar 18:46:13 144 0.933 7 min., 25 sec. South America
[Annular: Chile, Argentina]
2025
Mar 14 Total Lunar 6:59:56 123 1.178 3 hour, 38 min. Americas, Europe, Africa
Mar 29 Partial Solar 10:48:36 149 0.938 - Africa, Europe, Asia
Sep 07 Total Lunar 18:12:58 128 1.362 3 hour, 29 min. Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia
Sep 21 Partial Solar 19:43:04 154 0.855 - Australia, Antarctica
2026
Feb 17 Annular Solar 12:13:05 121 0.963 2 min., 20 sec. South America, Africa, Antarctica
[Annular: Antarctica]
Mar 03 Total Lunar 11:34:52 133 1.151 3 hour, 27 min. Asia, Australia, Americas
Aug 12 Total Solar 17:47:05 126 1.039 2 min., 18 sec. North America, Africa, Europe
[Total: Arctic, Greenland, Iceland, Spain]
Aug 28 Partial Lunar 4:14:04 138 0.93 3 hour, 18 min. Americas, Europe, Africa

Notes

  1. UTC of Greatest Eclipse
    During a solar eclipse, the greatest eclipse is the instant when the distance between the Moon's shadow axis and Earth's center reaches a minimum. During a lunar eclipse, greatest eclipse is the instant when the distance between the axis of Earth's umbral shadow and the center of the Moon's disk reaches a minimum. Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) is the world's time standard and basis for atomic clocks. This time zone can easily be converted into your local time.
  2. Saros Series
    The Saros Series is a period of 223 lunar months that has been used to predict eclipses for thousands of years. In a Saros Series, exactly 9 years, 5.5 days after any lunar eclipse, a solar eclipse will occur, and vice versa.
  3. Eclipse Magnitude (Solar) & Umbral Magnitude (Lunar)
    Eclipse magnitude for solar eclipses is the fraction of the Sun's diameter obscured by the Moon. For annular eclipses, the eclipse magnitude is always less than 1. For total eclipses, the eclipse magnitude is always greater than or equal to 1. For both annular and total eclipses, the value listed is actually the ratio of diameters between the Moon and the Sun. Umbral magnitude for lunar eclipses is the fraction of the Moon's diameter obscured by Earth's umbral shadow at the instant of greatest eclipse. For total eclipses, the umbral magnitude is always greater than or equal to 1. For partial eclipses, the umbral magnitude is always greater than 0 and less than 1. For penumbral eclipses, the umbral magnitude is always negative (i.e., less than 0).
  4. Longest Duration of Eclipse Totality or Annularity
    This is the longest duration of totality or annularity along the eclipse's path. Viewers will experience a partial eclipse before and after this length of time.
  5. Geographic Region of Eclipse Visibility
    Geographic Region of Eclipse Visibility is the portion of Earth's surface where a partial eclipse can be seen. The central path of a total or annular eclipse covers a much smaller region of Earth and is described by listing the countries the path crosses in brackets [].

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