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Neptune: FAQ
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Just one: Voyager 2 in 1989.

No, there are no missions planned at this time. Read more about Voyager 2, the only mission to have visited this world.

Planets get their color from what they are made of -- their composition. Both Uranus and Neptune get their blue-green color from methane, but Neptune is a more vivid and brighter blue, which points to Neptune having an unknown component.

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One day on Neptune takes about 16 hours.

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Perhaps in a secure spacecraft in a flyby. However, it would take a long time to get there, and once a person did get there, there would not be any surface to land on, since Neptune is a gas giant.

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Neptune does not have a solid surface, but its atmosphere (made up mostly of hydrogen, helium and methane) extends to great depths, gradually merging into water and other melted ices over a heavier, approximately Earth-size solid core.

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Neptune is not visible to the naked eye. You would need a telescope in order to view Neptune from Earth.

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No, Uranus is slightly bigger than Neptune. Uranus is about 50,724 km (31,518 miles) across (diameter) where Neptune is about 49,244 km (30,599 miles) across.

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Planets get their color from what they are made of -- their composition. Both Uranus and Neptune get their blue-green color from methane, but Neptune is a more vivid and brighter blue, which points to Neptune having an unknown component.

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A gigantic storm the size of the entire Earth. Like most storms, it passed and later was replaced by two smaller storms, which also disappeared over time.

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Yes, Neptune has six rings.

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Yes, Neptune has 13 moons.

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Most of the planets in our solar system are named after ancient Greek and Roman gods (and one goddess). Therefore, Neptune follows that pattern. Neptune is the name for the Roman god of the sea.

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Yes, it is about 27 times more powerful than Earth's magnetic field.

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Last Updated: 2 Apr 2014