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Live Webcast to Present Sights and Sounds of Jupiter
Live Webcast to Present Sights and Sounds of Jupiter
19 Jan 2001
(Source: Jet Propulsion Laboratory)

MEDIA RELATIONS OFFICE
JET PROPULSION LABORATORY
CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION
PASADENA, CALIF. 91109. TELEPHONE (818) 354-5011
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov

Contact: Guy Webster, (818) 354-6278

During a live webcast on Monday, Jan. 22, scientists from California, Iowa and Colorado will discuss some of the Jupiter images and other information they have received recently from NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

The two-hour Internet event from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., will begin at 8:30 a.m. PST (11:30 a.m. EST) at:

http://www.liveonthenet.com/show.cgi?/2001/nasa/show103

Dr. Andrew Ingersoll, a planetary scientist at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, will discuss studies of Jupiter's atmosphere, including movie clips of swirling storms imaged by Cassini. Dr. William Kurth, a physicist for the University of Iowa, Iowa City, will present information about studies of natural radio waves near Jupiter and what they reveal about the giant magnetic field surrounding the planet. Some of the radio waves will be presented as audio clips. Dr. Larry Esposito, a planetary scientist at the University of Colorado, Boulder, will show some initial results of using an ultraviolet imaging instrument on Cassini to "see" a doughnut-shaped ring around Jupiter fed by volcanic gases from the moon Io.

Tuning in requires free pre-registration with LiveOnTheNet at http://www.liveonthenet.com. Questions for the panel may be submitted to webcast@jpl.nasa.gov. Additional information about the webcast is available at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/jupiterflyby.

Cassini is a cooperative mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The spacecraft passed Jupiter three weeks ago en route to its main destination, Saturn. Through March, it will continue a collaborative study of Jupiter with Galileo, which has been orbiting Jupiter since 1995. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology, manages Galileo and Cassini for the NASA Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

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Last Updated: 5 Jun 2001