National Aeronautics and Space Administration Logo
Follow this link to skip to the main content NASA Banner
Solar System Exploration
News & Events
Skeleton of Sun's Atmosphere Reveals its True Nature
Skeleton of Sun's Atmosphere Reveals its True Nature
18 Apr 2007
(Source: Royal Astronomical Society)

The Sun's outer atmosphere or corona is incredibly complex, as shown in observations from space. It is also extremely hot, with a temperature of over a million degrees by comparison with that of the Sun's surface of only 6000 degrees. Scientists have now made a major breakthrough in understanding this complexity by studying the 'skeleton' of the magnetic field. A team of scientists from St Andrew's University will present the results on Monday 16 April at the Royal Astronomical Society National Astronomy Meeting in Preston. "It is the Sun's magnetic field that dominates the behaviour of the corona and determines its structure", said team member Andrew Haynes, "and our work is a key step forward in understanding its structure".

Until now the complexity of the magnetic field has baffled solar scientists. Professor Eric Priest first proposed the concept of the solar skeleton in 1996. It consists of the key elements on which the complex shape of the magnetic field is built. "We realised", added Dr Clare Parnell, "that by constructing the skeleton of the field, we could unravel this complexity and hopefully determine how the corona is heated".

Dr Parnell and colleagues have managed to develop a computer experiment, which simulates the complex structure of the corona and have found that the coronal heating is focused in specific parts of the skeleton. "In future", she added, "we should be able to compare this type of analysis with dramatic new observations from the recently launched Hinode spacecraft and thereby really nail down the heating mechanism".

The work of the St Andrew's team indicates that the solar skeleton changes continually and has a much richer structure than anyone imagined. Their work is a building block in astronomers' efforts to better understand events such as the solar flares and coronal mass ejections that eject billions of tonnes of matter into space.

CONTACT(s):

Dr Clare Parnell School of Mathematics and Statistics University of St. Andrews Tel: +44 (0)1334 463706 E-mail: clare@mcs.st-and.ac.uk

Dr Andrew Haynes School of Mathematics and Statistics University of St. Andrews Tel: +44 (0)1334 463728 E-mail: andrew@mcs.st-and.ac.uk

IMAGES:

These are available via the links below:

1. The complex magnetic field in the solar atmosphere. The particular field lines drawn are the ones likely to be heated and therefore observed on the Sun. (http://www-solar.mcs.st-and.ac.uk/~clare/NAM07/parnell_haynes1.png)

2. Typical image of the solar corona clearly revealing the complex tangle of heated magnetic loops from TRACE (Image: NASA). (http://www-solar.mcs.st-and.ac.uk/~clare/NAM07/parnell_haynes2.gif)

3. Simulated image of the interaction of a pair of magnetic fragments with opposite polarities. The yellow lines (regions) are the heating sites and the red and blue field lines show the magnetic skeleton. (http://www-solar.mcs.st-and.ac.uk/~clare/NAM07/parnell_haynes3.png)

News Archive Search  Go!
Show  results per page
 
 
Awards and Recognition   Solar System Exploration Roadmap   Contact Us   Site Map   Print This Page
NASA Official: Kristen Erickson
Advisory: Dr. James Green, Director of Planetary Science
Outreach Manager: Alice Wessen
Curator/Editor: Phil Davis
Science Writer: Autumn Burdick
Producer: Greg Baerg
Webmaster: David Martin
> NASA Science Mission Directorate
> Budgets, Strategic Plans and Accountability Reports
> Equal Employment Opportunity Data
   Posted Pursuant to the No Fear Act
> Information-Dissemination Policies and Inventories
> Freedom of Information Act
> Privacy Policy & Important Notices
> Inspector General Hotline
> Office of the Inspector General
> NASA Communications Policy
> USA.gov
> ExpectMore.gov
> NASA Advisory Council
> Open Government at NASA
Last Updated: 18 Apr 2007