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Copernicus and Tycho
Copernicus and Tycho (click to enlarge)
 
 

Copernicus and Tycho
Date: 5 Mar 2005

Dazzling in binoculars or a small telescope, the Moon is pocked with impact craters. During partial lunar phases, the craters along the terminator are cast in dramatic relief by strong shadows. But when the Moon is full some craters seem to sprout systems of bright radial lines or rays.


This detailed close-up of the full Moon features two prominent ray craters, Copernicus (upper left) and Tycho (lower right), each with extensive ray systems of light colored debris blasted out by the crater-forming impacts. In general, ray craters are relatively young as their rays overlay the lunar terrain. In fact, at 85 km wide, Tycho, with its far reaching rays, is the youngest large crater on the nearside. Crater Copernicus, surrounded by dark mare which contrast nicely with its bright rays, is 93 km in diameter.


Last Update: 28 Mar 2011 (AMB)

Credit: Steve Mandel, Hidden Valley Observatory (Copyrighted)



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Last Updated: 28 Mar 2011