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The Copernican Universe
The Copernican Universe (click to enlarge)
 
 

The Copernican Universe
Date: 1 Jan 1660

The Copernican universe illustrated in The Harmonia Macrocosmica of Andreas Cellarius

Defining the term planet is important, because such definitions reflect our understanding of the origins, architecture, and evolution of our solar system. Over historical time, objects categorized as planets have changed. The ancient Greeks counted the Earth's moon and sun as planets along with Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn. Earth was not considered a planet, but rather was thought to be the central object around which all the other celestial objects orbited. The first known model that placed the sun at the center of the known universe with the Earth revolving around it was presented by Aristarchus of Samos in the third century BCE, but it was not generally accepted. It wasn't until the 16th century that the idea was revived by Nicolaus Copernicus. By the 17th century, astronomers (aided by the invention of the telescope) realized that the sun was the celestial object around which all the planets - including Earth - orbit, and that the moon is not a planet, but a satellite (moon) of Earth. Uranus was added as a planet in 1781 and Neptune was discovered in 1846.

Credit: Robert Harry van Gent, University of Utrecht



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