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Image of the Moon and Earth
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Moon: NASA's Lunar Portal
Moon Facts
Moon Fact
Moonquakes

There are two types of earthquakes that happen on the moon: deep moonquakes and shallow moonquakes.

EYES on LADEE: Explore the Moon in 3D
Moon Facts
A Closer Look

This close-up image of the lunar surface is from the Luna 9 lander in the Oceanus Procellarum. This is the first image from the surface of the moon.

The Moon Festival

Did you know the Chinese and Vietnamese have a festival each year to celebrate the moon?

Ancient Rocks

Moon-rock ages range from about 3.2 billion years in the maria (dark, low basins) to nearly 4.6 billion years in the terrae (light, rugged highlands). Active geologic forces, including plate tectonics and erosion, continuously repave the oldest surfaces on Earth whereas old surfaces persist with little disturbance on the moon.

First Interaction with the Moon

In 1940, the Diana Project was the first experiment to successfully bounce radio signals off the moon.

Deep Impact

The moon's deepest craters are 4,500 m (15,000 feet). The South Pole-Aitken basin on the moon is an abyss that could engulf the United States from the East Coast through Texas.

Our Drifting Moon

Did you know the moon is moving away from the Earth at a rate of 1.5 inches per year?

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Lunar Mascons

Mass is not distributed uniformly inside the moon. Large mass concentrations ("mascons") lie beneath the surface of many large lunar basins and probably represent thick accumulations of dense lava. Relative to its geometric center, the moon's center of mass is displaced toward Earth by several kilometers.

Moon Phase Simulator

Interested in learning more about the phases of the moon?

Try the University of Nebraska's Lunar Phases Simulator.

Heavyweight

Total weight: of the moon is 74 sextillion km (that's 81 quintillion tons).

Moon Dust

The moon's surface is covered by a pile of rock fragments and dust called lunar regolith. The thickness of the regolith varies from about 5 m on mare surfaces to about 10 m on highland surfaces.

Earth Lashing

Every month when the moon gets a lashing from Earth's magnetic tail. This has consequences ranging from lunar "dust storms" to electrostatic discharges.

Long Road

It would take 135 days to drive by car to the moon at 70 mph.

Weightless? Not Quite

Gravity on the moon is only 1/6 of that found on Earth.

Long Gone

There are no active volcanoes on the moon now. The moon's volcanoes have been extinct for billions of years.

First Step

The first human being walked on the moon on 20 July 1969.

Space Face

Can you spot the face of the man on the moon?

Moon Day

A lunar day (or the time it takes from sunrise to sunrise) on the moon is approximately 708 hours.

Moon Gods

Most ancient religions had a moon god or goddess. One Roman moon goddess was named Luna, and this is why many modern words associated with the moon have "Luna" as their root.

Super Harvest Moon

September's full moon is referred to as the "Harvest Moon" because it occurs during harvest-time. The next "super" harvest moon will not occur until 2029.

Orange Rocks on the Moon

How did orange soil appear on the moon? This mystery began when astronaut Harrison Schmidt noticed the off-color patch near Apollo 17's Taurus-Littrow landing site in 1972. Astronauts scooped up some of the unusual orange soil for inspection back on Earth. Lunar geologists now think that the orange soil was created during an ancient fire-fountain.

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Last Updated: 11 Jul 2013