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Our Star
The sun is a star, a hot ball of glowing gases at the heart of our solar system. Its influence extends far beyond the orbits of distant Neptune and Pluto. Without the sun's intense energy and heat, there would be no life on Earth. And though it is special to us, there are billions of stars like our sun scattered across the Milky Way galaxy.

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Internet Resources
1. Refers to materials, information, and resources available free-of-charge
through the internet. NASA sites are in the public domain.
2. Some books, articles, and technical reports held by the NASA Library may be
available in full-text or full-image through the internet. Cite these materials
under appropriate print guidelines and include the web address at the
end of the citation
3. Do NOT select Internet resources with addresses ending in *.asp or *.cfm as
these are impermanent dynamic address formats.

Citation Format
1. Use the International Standards Organization style (ISO 690-2) accepted by
the Chicago Manual (see http://www.nlc-bnc.ca/iso/tc46sc9/standard/690-
2e.htm).
2. Online resources must include the date the page was last accessed.
3. Modify the ISO format by removing the sentence, "Available from
Internet" from the citation.
4. Example: Science Feature

Phillips, Dr. Tony. Wide Awake in the Sea of Tranquility. 27 August 2012 [cited19 September 2012]. http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/scitech/display.cfm?ST_ID=2501

Internet Resources
1. Refers to materials, information, and resources available free-of-charge
through the internet. NASA sites are in the public domain.
2. Some books, articles, and technical reports held by the NASA Library may be
available in full-text or full-image through the internet. Cite these materials
under appropriate print guidelines and include the web address at the
end of the citation
3. Do NOT select Internet resources with addresses ending in *.asp or *.cfm as
these are impermanent dynamic address formats.

Citation Format
1. Use the International Standards Organization style (ISO 690-2) accepted by
the Chicago Manual (see http://www.nlc-bnc.ca/iso/tc46sc9/standard/690-
2e.htm).
2. Online resources must include the date the page was last accessed.
3. Modify the ISO format by removing the sentence, "Available from
Internet" from the citation.
4. Example: Science Feature

Phillips, Dr. Tony. Wide Awake in the Sea of Tranquility. 27 August 2012 [cited19 September 2012]. http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/scitech/display.cfm?ST_ID=2501