HOMEWORK HELPER
I need help with a report about...


Space Rocks
Little chunks of rock and debris in space are called meteoroids. They become meteors -- or shooting stars -- when they fall through a planet's atmosphere; leaving a bright trail as they are heated to incandescence by the friction of the atmosphere. Pieces that survive the journey and hit the ground are called meteorites.

Meteors & Meteorites Icon
Just the Facts
Just the Facts
Dig Deeper
Dig Deeper
Dig Deeper
Create Your Report
Create Your Report
Even More Stuff...
Even More Stuff...
  News Features People Extreme Facts Dictionary

Previous
Previous
    1     2    
Next
    Show All
Perseid Meteors vs. the Supermoon
Perseid Meteors vs. the Supermoon
In a normal year, dark-sky observers typically count more than 100 Perseids per hour. But this is no normal year.Read More...
A New Meteor Shower in May?
A New Meteor Shower in May?
The shower is the May Camelopardalids, caused by dust from periodic comet 209P/LINEAR. No one has ever seen it before, but this year the Camelopardalids could put on a display that rivals the well-known Perseids of August.Read More...
Around the World in Four Days: NASA Tracks Chelyabinsk Meteor Plume
Around the World in Four Days: NASA Tracks Chelyabinsk Meteor Plume
Atmospheric physicist Nick Gorkavyi missed witnessing an event of the century last winter when a meteor exploded over his hometown of Chelyabinsk, Russia. From Greenbelt, Md., however, NASA's Gorkavyi and colleagues witnessed a never-before-seen view ...Read More...
Heliophysics Nugget: Mapping Tons of Meteoric Dust in the Sky
Heliophysics Nugget: Mapping Tons of Meteoric Dust in the Sky
On Aug.11 and 12, 2013, the annual Perseid meteor shower will peak, filling the sky with streaks of light, commonly known as shooting stars.Read More...
Perseid Fireballs
Perseid Fireballs
In astronomy, there's nothing quite like a bright meteor streaking across the glittering canopy of a moonless night sky. The unexpected flash of light adds a dash of magic to an ordinary walk under the stars.Read More...
Noctilucent Clouds, Comets, and Meteor Showers
Noctilucent Clouds, Comets, and Meteor Showers
This summer northern skywatchers may be able to see Noctilucent or "Night Shining" Clouds. Also called PMCs (Polar Mesospheric Clouds), these apparitions are a bit of a puzzle for scientists because it is not entirely clear how they form.Read More...
Noctilucent Clouds Get an Early Start
Noctilucent Clouds Get an Early Start
Every summer, something strange and wonderful happens high above the north pole. Ice crystals begin to cling to the smoky remains of meteors, forming electric-blue clouds with tendrils that ripple hypnotically against the sunset sky.Read More...
Bright Explosion on the Moon
Bright Explosion on the Moon
NASA researchers who monitor the Moon for meteoroid impacts have detected an explosion ten times brighter than anything they've seen before.Read More...
Comet ISON Meteor Shower
Comet ISON Meteor Shower
Anticipation is building as Comet ISON plunges into the inner solar system for a close encounter with the sun in November 2013. Blasted at point-blank range by solar radiation, the sungrazer will likely become one of the finest comets in many years.Read More...
What Exploded over Russia?
What Exploded over Russia?
"It was a meteor strike--the most powerful since the Tunguska event of 1908," says Bill Cooke of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office.Read More...
Previous
Previous
    1     2    
Next
    Show All
Previous
Previous
    1     2    
Next
    Show All
Perseid Meteors vs. the Supermoon
Perseid Meteors vs. the Supermoon
In a normal year, dark-sky observers typically count more than 100 Perseids per hour. But this is no normal year.Read More...
A New Meteor Shower in May?
A New Meteor Shower in May?
The shower is the May Camelopardalids, caused by dust from periodic comet 209P/LINEAR. No one has ever seen it before, but this year the Camelopardalids could put on a display that rivals the well-known Perseids of August.Read More...
Around the World in Four Days: NASA Tracks Chelyabinsk Meteor Plume
Around the World in Four Days: NASA Tracks Chelyabinsk Meteor Plume
Atmospheric physicist Nick Gorkavyi missed witnessing an event of the century last winter when a meteor exploded over his hometown of Chelyabinsk, Russia. From Greenbelt, Md., however, NASA's Gorkavyi and colleagues witnessed a never-before-seen view ...Read More...
Heliophysics Nugget: Mapping Tons of Meteoric Dust in the Sky
Heliophysics Nugget: Mapping Tons of Meteoric Dust in the Sky
On Aug.11 and 12, 2013, the annual Perseid meteor shower will peak, filling the sky with streaks of light, commonly known as shooting stars.Read More...
Perseid Fireballs
Perseid Fireballs
In astronomy, there's nothing quite like a bright meteor streaking across the glittering canopy of a moonless night sky. The unexpected flash of light adds a dash of magic to an ordinary walk under the stars.Read More...
Noctilucent Clouds, Comets, and Meteor Showers
Noctilucent Clouds, Comets, and Meteor Showers
This summer northern skywatchers may be able to see Noctilucent or "Night Shining" Clouds. Also called PMCs (Polar Mesospheric Clouds), these apparitions are a bit of a puzzle for scientists because it is not entirely clear how they form.Read More...
Noctilucent Clouds Get an Early Start
Noctilucent Clouds Get an Early Start
Every summer, something strange and wonderful happens high above the north pole. Ice crystals begin to cling to the smoky remains of meteors, forming electric-blue clouds with tendrils that ripple hypnotically against the sunset sky.Read More...
Bright Explosion on the Moon
Bright Explosion on the Moon
NASA researchers who monitor the Moon for meteoroid impacts have detected an explosion ten times brighter than anything they've seen before.Read More...
Comet ISON Meteor Shower
Comet ISON Meteor Shower
Anticipation is building as Comet ISON plunges into the inner solar system for a close encounter with the sun in November 2013. Blasted at point-blank range by solar radiation, the sungrazer will likely become one of the finest comets in many years.Read More...
What Exploded over Russia?
What Exploded over Russia?
"It was a meteor strike--the most powerful since the Tunguska event of 1908," says Bill Cooke of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office.Read More...
Previous
Previous
    1     2    
Next
    Show All