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How Low Can You Go
Topic: Gravity: It's What Keeps Us Together
Grade Level: K-4
Body: Earth
Mission: Earth Science (Earth)

Short Description: Students compare the weight of various objects and describe gravity as the force that holds us on the Earth.


How Much Would You Weigh on Distant Planets
Topic: Gravity: It's What Keeps Us Together
Grade Level: 5-8
Body: Earth's Moon
Mission: Apollo 11 (Earth's Moon), Apollo 12 (Earth's Moon), Apollo 14 (Earth's Moon), Apollo 15 (Earth's Moon), Apollo 17 (Earth's Moon), Apollo (Earth's Moon)

Short Description: Students view Web movies of astronauts on the moon and discuss what they can learn about one's lunar weight; a calculator is provided to get their weight on other planets; a discussion of the causes of weight and gravity is then suggested with different hypotheses.


Ice in the Solar System
Topic: Ice in the Solar System
Grade Level: K-4, 5-8
Body: Our Solar System, Mercury, Earth's Moon
Mission: Lunar Recon Orbiter (Earth's Moon), MESSENGER (Mercury)

Short Description: Students examine different types of ices, discover where these different ices occur in the solar system, how scientists determine what ice is where, meet some of the scientists who are exploring these ice worlds, and explore why their work is so important!


In the Footsteps of Galileo: Observing the Moons of Jupiter
Topic: Moons and Rings, Our Evolving Understanding of Our Solar System
Grade Level: 5-8, 9-12
Body: Our Solar System, Jupiter, Europa
Mission: Juno (Jupiter)

Short Description: Students learn about the scientific method and do a simplified version of Galileo's pioneering observations of Jupiter's moons, which similarly supported a new model of our solar system.


Inside Mars -- Puzzling Patterns -- Where Does Volcanism Occur?
Topic: Our Evolving Understanding of Our Solar System
Grade Level: K-4, 5-8, 9-12
Body: Earth, Mars
Mission: Mars Recon Orbiter (Mars)

Short Description: Students compare volcano maps of Earth and Mars and identify patterns, similarities and differences.


Investigating the Atmosphere of Super-Earth GJ 1214b
Topic: Space Math, Windy Worlds: Gas Giants, Atmospheres and Weather
Grade Level: 5-8
Body: Beyond Our Solar System
Mission: Hubble (Beyond Our Solar System)

Short Description: Students create a model of the interior of an exoplanet using its mass, average density and radius as constraints to determine the thickness of its atmosphere.


Investigating the Insides
Topic: Investigating Our Planetary Family Tree
Grade Level: K-4, 5-8
Body: Jupiter
Mission: Juno (Jupiter)

Short Description: In this 30-minute activity, teams of children, ages 9 to13, investigate the composition of unseen materials, using a variety of tools. This open-ended engagement activity mimics how scientists discover clues about the interiors of planets with cameras and other instruments onboard spacecraft.


Investigating the Martian Polar Caps
Topic: Ice in the Solar System
Grade Level: 5-8
Body: Earth, Mars
Mission: Hubble (Beyond Our Solar System)

Short Description: Students use internet resources and image processing to measure and compare the Martian and terrestrial polar caps at different seasons, and analyze their results.


Invisible Collisions
Topic: Gravity: It's What Keeps Us Together
Grade Level: 9-12
Body: Mercury
Mission: Mariner 10 (Mercury)

Short Description: This activity relates an elastic collision to the change in a satellite's or spacecraft's speed and direction resulting from a planetary fly-by, often called a "gravity assist" maneuver. Both hands-on and online interactive methods are used to explore these topics.


It's Just a Phase: Water as a Solid, Liquid, and Gas
Topic: Water in the Solar System
Grade Level: 5-8, 9-12
Body: Earth
Mission: Earth Science (Earth)

Short Description: Students construct models of the way water molecules arrange themselves in the three physical states.

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Last Updated: 21 Oct 2011