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All About Ice
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All About Ice

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Short Description: In this suite of activities, students investigate ice, learn about its properties and explore how it can change states to a liquid or a gas. Through hands-on experiences, they observe ice, find its melting and freezing point, and learn about some of its unique properties, including that ice, the solid phase of water, is less dense than the liquid!

Topic: Ice in the Solar System

Grade Level: K-4

Body: Our Solar System, Earth

Mission:

Science Education Standards:

Benchmarks

By the end of the 2nd grade, students should know that
  • Water can be a liquid or a solid and can go back and forth from one form to the other. If water is turned into ice and then the ice is allowed to melt, the amount of water is the same as it was before freezing. 4B/P2

National Science Education Standards

Earth and Space Science -Content Standard D

Grades K-4
PROPERTIES OF OBJECTS AND MATERIALS
Materials can exist in different states -- solid, liquid and gas. Some common materials, such as water, can be changed from one state to another by heating or cooling.

Source: Lunar and Planetary Institute


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Last Updated: 1 Jul 2014