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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Glenn S. Orton

Co-Authors: L. N. Fletcher, T. Stallard, K. Baines, K. M. Sayanagi, Y. Yung, S. Edgington, S. Gulkis, J. Moses, F. J. Martin-Torres, U. Dyudina, B. Marty, N. Teanby, P.G.J. Irwin, T. Cavalié, D.H. Atkinson, O. Mousis, A.J. Friedson, T.R. Spilker, M. Hofstadter, R. Morales-Juberias, A.P. Showman, X. Liu, P. Hartogh, M. Wong, T.R. Spilker, M.B. Lystrup, A. Coustenis, T. Greathouse, R. K. Achterberg, G.L. Bjoraker, S.S. Limaye, P. Read, D. Gautier, D.S. Choi, T. Kostiuk, D. Huestis, A.F. Nagy, M. Choukroun, I. Muller-Wodarg, P. Yanamandra-Fisher
Saturn Atmospheric Science in the Next Decade We describe the key goals for Saturn atmospheric science (from Cassini, observatories, and new missions) organized into 5 themes: composition and chemistry, weather-layer dynamics and internal structure, clouds and hazes, time-variable phenomena and coupling to the external environment. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Samuel J. Lawrence

Co-Authors: Georgiana Y. Kramer, Bradley L. Jolliff, B. Ray Hawke, Mark S. Robinson, Justin J. Hagerty, G. Jeffrey Taylor, Jeffrey Plescia, W. Brent Garry, Julie D. Stopar, Brett W. Denevi, S. E. Braden, L. R. Ostrach, David T. Blewett, Tomas Magna, Thomas R. Watters, Lisa R. Gaddis, Rongxing Li, Clive R. Neal, Jeffrey Gillis-Davis
Sampling the Age Extremes of Lunar Volcanism: the Youngest and Oldest Lunar Basalts Automated sample return missions to the youngest (Procellarum) and oldest (cryptomaria) basalts on the lunar surface will help improve our absolute chronology for the inner Solar System by providing the timing for the beginning and end of lunar basaltic volcanism. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Arizona State University Download File

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Allan Treiman

Co-Authors: Meenakshi Wadhwa, Clive R. Neal, Charles K. Shearer, Bradley L. Jolliff, Lars E. Borg, Dimitri Papanastassiou, Malcolm J. Rutherford, Christine Floss, Andrew M. Davis, Steven Symes, Susanne Schwenzer, Mark D. Fries, Andrew Westphall, Barbara Cohen, David A. Kring
Sample Return from the Earth’s Moon This white paper makes the case that sample return from selected locations on the Moon in the coming decade will provide extraordinary advances in lunar and Solar System science. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Lunar and Planetary Institute Download File

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Scott Messenger

Co-Authors: Andrew Davis, George Flynn, Lindsay Keller, Allan Treiman, Meenakshi Wadhwa, Andrew Westphal
Sample Return from Primitive Asteroids and Comets This white paper makes the case for sample return from primitive asteroids and comets in the next decade to address some of the most important questions in planetary science relating to the origin and history (and particularly the origin and distribution of organics and water) of the Solar System. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Johnson Space Center Download File

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Dana Backman SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) and Planetary Science This paper consists of the intro & observatory capabilities (ch. 1) plus the planetary science (ch. 5) portions of the SOFIA Science Vision doc pub. in 2009 as an update of the scientific case for SOFIA. D. Backman produced this extract; the original doc is authored by the SOFIA Science Team. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. SOFIA / SETI Institute Download File

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Matthew Tiscareno

Co-Authors: Nicole Albers, Todd Bradley, Shawn M. Brooks, Joseph A. Burns, Carlos Chavez, Joshua E. Colwell, Jeffrey N. Cuzzi, Imke de Pater, Luke Dones, Gianrico Filacchione, Silvia M. Giuliatti Winter, Mitchell K. Gordon, Eberhard Gruen, Douglas P. Hamilton, Matthew M. Hedman, Mihaly Horanyi, Harald Krueger, Jack J. Lissauer, Philip D. Nicholson, Robert T. Pappalardo, Frank Postberg, Mark R. Showalter, Frank Spahn, Linda J. Spilker, Joseph N. Spitale, Miodrag Sremcevic, Padma Yanamandra-Fisher, Gregory J. Black, André Brahic, Sébastien Charnoz, Richard H. Durisen, Michael W. Evans, Cecile Ferrari, Amara Graps, Sascha Kempf, Steven M. Larson, Mark C. Lewis, Essam A. Marouf, Colin J. Mitchell, Carl D. Murray, Cathy B. Olkin, Keiji Ohtsuki, Derek C. Richardson, Heikki Salo, Juergen Schmidt, David A. Seal, Ralf Srama, Glen R. Stewart, John W. Weiss
Rings Research in the Next Decade The study of planetary ring systems forms a key component of planetary science. We discuss priority activities for the next decade including full support for the Cassini Solstice Mission, a spacecraft mission to Neptune and/or Uranus, and support for Earth-based research activities. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Cornell University Download File

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Charles D., Jr. Edwards

Co-Authors: William B. Banerdt, David W. Beaty, Leslie K. Tamppari, Richard W. Zurek
Relay Orbiters for Enhancing and Enabling Mars In Situ Exploration This white paper describes the role that orbital relay telecommunications have played as an integral part of science investigation of Mars, and the importance and continuing evolution for support to future missions. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Robert Hodyss

Co-Authors: Paul D. Cooper, Reggie Hudson, Robert Carlson, Paul V. Johnson, Arthur L. Lane, Marla Moore, Louis J. Allamandola
Recommended Laboratory Studies in Support of Planetary Science: Surface Chemistry of Icy Bodies We identify several areas where an increased emphasis on laboratory activities would lead to a significant return in scientific results, based on an enhanced understanding of the fundamental surface chemistry of icy bodies. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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J.B. Dalton

Co-Authors: J.C. Castillo, L.R. Brown, R.P. Hodyss, P.V. Johnson, M. Gudipati, R.M. Mastrapa, K. McKeegan, R.N. Clark, P.H. Schultz, A.R. Hendrix, S.T. Stewart, S. Ruff, K.P. Hand, T. Spilker
Recommended Laboratory Studies in Support of Planetary Science Planetary science in the next decade will include major spacecraft missions to inner and outer solar system targets. Interpretation of these mission observations requires knowledge of fundamental physical and chemical properties of planetary materials. Much theoretical work at present depends upon r Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Tsun-Yee Yan Yan

Co-Authors: K. Clark, R. Rasmussen
Radiation Facts and Mitigation Strategies for the JEO Mission The challenge associated with operating a spacecraft for long periods within the radiation belts of Jupiter cannot be underestimated. To realize the promise of incredible science the risk must be identified and controlled. Given the identified steps, the design is well in hand and would allow this s Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Jon D. Giorgini

Co-Authors: Lance A. M. Benner, Marina Brozovic, Michael W. Busch, Donald B. Campbell, Steven R. Chesley, Paul W. Chodas, Ellen Howell, Jean-Luc Margot, Andrea Milani Petr Pravec, Robert A. Preston, Maria-Eugenia Sansaturio, Daniel J. Scheeres, Michael K. Shepard, Arnold Silva, Martin A. Slade, Patrick A. Taylor, Giovanni Valsecchi, David Vokrouhlický, Donald K. Yeomans
Radar Astrometry of Small Bodies: Detection, Characterization, Trajectory Prediction, and Hazard Assessment Radar astrometry reduces trajectory uncertainties by orders of magnitude, thereby improving prediction, targeting, and impact probability estimates for small-bodies, while characterizing some at levels comparable to a spacecraft flyby. This improves resource use for ground and flight investigations. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Robert Schingler

Co-Authors: William Marshall, Alex MacDonald, Mark Lupisella, Brian Lewis
ROSI - Return on Science Investment A system for mission evaluation based on maximizing science None of the above. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Friedemann T. Freund Previously Overlooked/Ignored Electronic Charge Carriers in Rocks I would like to draw the attention of members of the Decadal Survey Committee to a rather fundamental discovery, which (I believe) will have a major impact on the Earth and Planetary Sciences in the coming years. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. NASA Ames Research Center/ SETI Institute Download File

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Andreas Rathke

Co-Authors: Torsten Bondo, Roger Walker, Andrew Willig, Dario Izzo, Mark Ayre
Preliminary Design of an Advanced Mission to Pluto A technology assessment and feasibility study is being performed within the ESA Advanced Concepts Team on sending a small-to-medium (700-900 kg) Nuclear Electric Propulsion spacecraft into orbit around Pluto with a mission launch in 2016 using existing or emerging space technology. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. ESA/ESTEC Advanced Concepts Team, Keplerlaan 1 2200 AZ, Nordwijk ZH, The Netherlands Download File

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Roger Yelle

Co-Authors: S. Horst, M. Allen, R. Amils, S. K. Atreya G. Bampasidis, A. Bar-Nun, P. Beauchamp, M. Cabane, M. Capria, R. Carlson, N. Carrasco, A. Coates, J. Cooper, M. Combes, T. Cours, H. Cottin, A. Coustenis, T. Cravens, J. Cui, R. de Kok, I. dePater, M. Dobrijevic, G. Durry, Y. Dutil, O. Dutuit, M. Fulchignoni, M. Galand, Y. Gao, D. Gautier, M. Gurwell, E. Hebrard, F. Hersant, H. Imanaka; W. Ip, R. Jaumann, A. Jolly, S. Karoly, E. Kostiuk, L.-M. Lara, P. Lavvas, S. Lebonnois, J.- P. Lebreton, M. Leese, S. Le Mou_elic, T. Livengood, R. Lopes, J. Lopez-Moreno, J. Lunine, P. Mahaffy, V. Mangano, T. McCord, R. Modolo, A. Morse, O. Mousis, I. Muller-Wodarg, A. Mura, G. Murthy C. Nixon, D. Nna-Mvondo, L. Norman, G. Ortega, G. Orton, M. Patel, A. Pavlov, C. Plainaki, P. Rannou K. Reh, M. Rengel, F. Robb, S. Rodriguez, R. Rodrigo, E. Schaller, B. Schmitt, D. Schulze-Makuch, E. Sciamma O''Brien, J. Soderblom, A. Somogyi, E. Sittler, D. Strobel, L. Spilker, T. Spilker, M. Smith, A. Steele, K. Stephan, N. Strange, C. Szopa, R. Thissen, F. Tosi, D. Toublanc, M. Trainer S. Tripathi, S. Ulamec, S. Vinatier, V. Vuitton, J.-E. Wahlund, J. H. Waite, M. Yamauchi, J. Zarnecki
Prebiotic Atmospheric Chemistry on Titan Cassini measurements reveal that organic molecules with molecular weights of hundreds of amu are formed by photochemistry in Titan''s upper atmosphere. Investigating this chemistry is important for understanding the production of biological building blocks by naturally occurring processes. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. University of Arizona Download File

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Mark Skidmore

Co-Authors: John Priscu, Brent Christner
Planetary Science & Astrobiology: Cold habitats for life in the Solar system The paper highlights that improved knowledge of the carbon and energy transformations necessary to support life at sub-zero temperatures is key to future planetary science and astrobiological research given ice is the most abundant phase of water in the Solar system. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Montana State University Download File

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Sami W. Asmar

Co-Authors: Kaare Aksnes, Roberto Ambrosini, Aseel Anabtawi, John D. Anderson, John W. Armstrong, David Atkinson, Jean-Pierre Barriot, Bruno Bertotti, Bruce G. Bills, Michael Bird, Veronique Dehant, Peter Edenhofer, F. Michael Flasar, William Folkner, Richard G. French, Hideo Hanada, Bernd Häusler, David P. Hinson, Luciano Iess, Özgür Karatekin, Arvydas J. Kliore, Alex S. Konopliv, Frank Lemoine, Ivan Linscott, Essam Marouf, Jean-Charles Marty, Koji Matsumoto, Hirotomo Noda, Kamal Oudrhiri, Meegyeong Paik, Ryan S. Park, Martin Pätzold, Robert Preston, Nicole Rappaport, Pascal Rosenblatt, Richard A. Simpson, David E. Smith, Suzanne Smrekar, Paul G. Steffes, Silvia Tellmann, Paolo Tortora, G. Leonard Tyler, Tim Van Hoolst, Michael Watkins, James G. Williams, Paul Withers, Xiaoping Wu, Donald Yeomans, Dah-Ning Yuan, Maria T. Zuber
Planetary Radio Science: Investigations of Interiors, Surfaces, Atmospheres, Rings, and Environments Scientists utilize radio links between spacecraft and Earth or between spacecraft to examine changes in the phase/frequency, and amplitude of radio signals to investigate atmospheres and ionospheres, rings, surfaces, shapes, gravitational fields, and dynamics of solar system bodies. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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John D. Rummel Planetary Protection for Planetary Science and Exploration A precis of planetary protection policy concerns, their history, and the role of the SSB and NASA internal advisory activities in ensuring progress and appropriate implementation of the policy. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. East Carolina University Download File

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Jonathan J. Fortney

Co-Authors: Kevin Zahnle, Isabelle Baraffe, Adam Burrows, Sarah E. Dodson-Robinson, Gilles Chabrier, Tristan Guillot, Ravit Helled, Franck Hersant, William B. Hubbard, Jack J. Lissauer, Mark S. Marley
Planetary Formation and Evolution Revealed with a Saturn Entry Probe: The Importance of Noble Gases The determination of Saturn’s atmospheric noble gas abundances are critical to understanding the formation and evolution of Saturn, and giant planets in general. These measurements can only be performed with an entry probe. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. University of California, Santa Cruz Download File

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David R. Thompson

Co-Authors: David R. Thompson, Robert C. Anderson, Benjamin Bornstein, Nathalie A. Cabrol, Steve Chien, Tara Estlin, Terry Fong, Robert Hogan, Ralph Lorenz, Daniel Gaines, Martha S. Gilmore, Mario Parente, Liam Pedersen, Ted L. Roush, Giuseppe Marzo, David Wettergreen
Onboard Science Data Analysis: Implications for Future Missions Onboard science data analysis enables new spacecraft operational modes that improve science yield. It can relieve constraints on time, bandwidth and power, and respond automatically to events on short time scales. We examine applications to rover, aerobot, and orbital platforms. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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Last Updated: 9 Apr 2012