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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Michael Hecht

Co-Authors: W. Thomas Pike, Walter Goetz, Morten Bo Madsen, Janice L. Bishop, Urs Staufer, Kjartan M. Kinch, Kristoffer Leer
The microstructure of the martian surface Martian soil is a microcosm of the mineralogical history of the planet, and it exerts a primary influence on atmospheric, geological, and periglacial properties. We propose an increased emphasis on microanalysis in future Mars surface exploration. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Paul Withers

Co-Authors: Jared Espley, Rob Lillis, Dave Morgan, Laila Andersson, Mathieu Barthélemy, Stephen Bougher, David Brain, Stephen Brecht, Tom Cravens, Geoff Crowley, Justin Deighan, Scott England, Jeffrey Forbes, Matt Fillingim, Jane Fox, Markus Fraenz, Brian Gilchrist, Erika Harnett, Faridah Honary, Dana Hurley, Muffarah Jahangeer, Robert Johnson, Donald Kirchner, Francois Leblanc, Mark Lester, Michael Liemohn, Jean Lilensten, Janet Luhmann, Rickard Lundin, Anthony Mannucci, Susan McKenna-Lawlor, Michael Mendillo, Erling Nielsen, Martin Pätzold, Carol Paty, Kurt Retherford, Cyril Simon, James Slavin, Bob Strangeway, Roland Thissen, Feng Tian, Olivier Witasse
The ionosphere of Mars and its importance for climate evolution The ionosphere of Mars is a key part of the boundary between Mars and the solar wind. The MAVEN mission will improve our understanding of ionospheric properties and processes, including how they affect the escape to space of atmospheric species, but other important questions will remain unanswered. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Boston University Download File

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Susanne P. Schwenzer

Co-Authors: O. Abramov, C. Allen, S. Clifford, J. Filiberto, D.A. Kring, J. Lasue, P.J. McGovern, H.E. Newsom, A.H. Treiman, A. Wittmann
The importance of (Noachian) impact craters as windows to the sub-surface and as potential hosts of life The paper demonstrated the research that can be done in small craters punctuating larger Noachian craters. Topics include: small craters as natural drills, impact-generated hydrothermal systems and lakes in Noachian craters, and the ecological niches created by them. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Lunar and Planetary Institute Download File

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Mark A. Bullock

Co-Authors: David A. Senske, Tibor. S. Balint, Alexis Benz, Bruce A. Campbell, Eric Chassefiere, Anthony Colaprete, James A. Cutts, Lori Glaze, Stephen Gorevan, David H. Grinspoon, Jeff Hall, George L. Hashimoto, James W. Head, Gary Hunter, Natasha Johnson, Viktor V. Kerzhanovich, Walter S. Kiefer, Elizabeth A. Kolawa, Tibor Kremic, Johnny Kwok, Sanjay S. Limaye, Stephen J. Mackwell, Mikhail Y. Marov, Adriana Ocampo, Gerald Schubert, Ellen R. Stofan, Hakan Svedhem, Dimitri V. Titov, Allen H. Treiman
The Venus Science and Technology Definition Team Flagship This white paper describes the scientific goals, objectives, instruments and mission architecture and design for a Flagship class mission to Venus. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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Scot Rafkin

Co-Authors: Robert. M. Haberle, Don Banfield, Jeff. Barnes
The Value of Landed Meteorological Investigations on Mars: The Next Advance for Climate Science Major advances in the understanding of the present and past Mars climate system are most likely to be accomplished by in situ meteorological surface measurements operating from both a network configuration and individual stations. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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Andrew Rivkin

Co-Authors: Joshua Emery, Antonella Barucci, James F. Bell, William F. Bottke, Elisabetta Dotto, Robert Gold, Carey Lisse, Javier Licandro, Louise Prockter, Charles Hibbits, Michael Paul, Alessondra Springmann, Bin Yang
The Trojan Asteroids: Keys to Many Locks The Trojan asteroids of Jupiter lie at the crux of several of the most interesting outstanding issues regarding the formation and evolution of the Solar System. We present science questions centering on the Trojans are lay out recommendations for their future study and exploration. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Laboratory Download File

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Erin Lee Ryan

Co-Authors: Sarah M. Hörst, Michael P.J. Benfield, Fred Calef III, Dario Cersosimo, Valeria Cottini, Robert Citron, Katherine E. Gibson, Joel A. Hesch, Dana Ionita, Craig C. Jolley, Driss Takir, Matthew Turner, Elizabeth A. Jensen
The TRACER mission: a proposed Trojan and Centaur flyby mission This paper presents a proposed flyby mission for one Trojan and one Centaur as designed by the participants of the JPL Planetary Science Summer School. This mission meets the current New Horizons guidelines and will address fundamental questions about the history of the solar system. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. University of Minnesota Download File

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James W. Ashley

Co-Authors: M. D. Fries, G. R. Huss, J. E. Chappelow, M. P. Golombek, M. A. Velbel, S. W. Ruff, C. Schröder, W. H. Farrand, D. D. Durda, P. A. Bland, I. Fleischer, A. C. McAdam, S. P. Wright, A. T. Knudson, L. A. Leshin, and A. Steele
The Scientific Rationale for Studying Meteorites found on Other Worlds The ongoing identification of several meteorite candidates on Mars is ushering in a new discipline in the planetary sciences. We feel that cultivating an appreciation for the potential science return represented by meteoritic specimens on Mars and the Moon may be important for the 2013-2022 decade. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Mars Space Flight Facility, Arizona State University Download File

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Scott L. Murchie

Co-Authors: Andrew S. Rivkin, Joseph Veverka, Peter C. Thomas, Nancy L. Chabot
The Scientific Rationale for Robotic Exploration of Phobos and Deimos Mars'' two moons, Phobos and Deimos, are D-type small bodies that may be remnants of the population that delivered volatiles to the inner solar system. A Discovery class mission can address key science questions at the moons, and prepare for future human exploration. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Laboratory Download File

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Ian Crawford

Co-Authors: Mahesh Anand, Professor Mark Burchell, James Carpenter, Barbara Cohen, Leon Croukamp, Andrew Daga, Hilary Downes, Sarah Fagents, Terence Hackwill, James N Head, Essam Heggy, Adrian Jones, Katherine Joy, Christian Koeberl, Philippe Lognonné, Clive Neal, Noah Petro, Professor Sara Russell, Joshua Snape, Larry Taylor, Allan Treiman, Shoshana Weider, Mark Wieczorek, Lionel Wilson
The Scientific Rationale for Renewed Human Exploration of the Moon This paper outlines the scientific benefits that will follow from renewed human exploration of the Moon. [Final version with updated author list] Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Birkbeck College London Download File

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Jonathan I. Lunine

Co-Authors: A. Coustenis, P. Beauchamp, K. Reh, G. Bampasitis, L. Bruzzone, M.T. Capria, Coates, A., A.J. Friedson, D. Gautier, R. Jaumann, K.K. Klaus, J-P. Lebreton, T. Livengood, R. Lopes-Gautier, E. Lellouch, R. Lorenz, F-J. Martin-Torres, X. Moussas, C. Nixon, J. Nott, S. Rafkin, F. RaulinLISA Univ. Paris, S. Rodriguez, F. Sohl, A. Solomonidou, E.C. Sitler, J. Soderblom, R. West, M. Wright
The Science of Titan and its Future Exploration This paper describes the science rationale for the next steps beyond Cassini-Huygens of exploration of Saturn''s moon Titan. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. University of Arizona Download File

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William Bruce Banerdt

Co-Authors: Bruce Banerdt, Tilman Spohn, Ulli Christensen, Veronique Dehant, Linda Elkins-Tanton, Robert Grimm, Matthias Grott, Bob Haberle, Martin Knapmeyer, Philippe Lognonné, Franck Montmessin, Yosio Nakamura, Roger Phillips, Scot Rafkin, Peter Read, Gerald Schubert, Sue Smrekar, Mike Wilson
The Rationale for a Long-Lived Geophysical Network Mission to Mars We advocate the placement of a geophysical network on Mars to investigate the deep interior using seismic, heat flow, precision tracking and electromagnetic sounding measurements. These stations should also support meteorological atmospheric boundary layer experiments. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Clive R. Neal

Co-Authors: Marek Banaszkiewicz, Bruce Banerdt, Bruce Bills, James Carpenter, Peter Chi, Ulli Christensen, Eric Clévédé, Barbara Cohen, Ian Crawford, Doug Currie, Paul Davis, Veronique Dehant, Simone Dell’Agnello, Andrew Dombard, Fred Duennebier, Linda Elkins-Tanton, Matthew Fouch, Cliff Frohlich, Jeannine Gagnepain-Beyneix, Raphael F. Garcia, Ed Garnero, Ian Garrick-Bethel, Domenico Giardini Robert Grimm, Matthias Grott, Jasper Halekas, Lon Hood, Berengere Houdou, Shaopeng Huang, Catherine Johnson, Bradley Jolliff, Katie Joy, Amir Khan, Oleg Khavroshkin, Krishan Khurana, Walter Kiefer, Naoki Kobayashi, Junji Koyama, Oleg Kuskov, Jesse Lawrence, Mathieu Lefeuvre, Lynn Lewis, John Longhi, Philippe Lognonné, Mioara Mandea, Michael Manga, Pat McGovern, David Mimoun, Antoine Mocquet, Jean-Paul Montagner, Paul Morgan, Seiichi Nagihara, Yosio Nakamura, Jürgen Oberst, Roger Phillips, Jeff Plescia, J. Todd Ratcliff, Lutz Richter, Chris Russell, Yoshifumi Saito, Gerald Schubert, Nikolai Shapiro, Charles Shearer, Hiroaki Shiraishi, Sue Smrekar, Tilman Spohn, Bob Strangeway, Eléonore Stutzmann, Satoshi Tanaka, Toshiro Tanimoto, Patrick Taylor, Ross Taylor, Junya Terazono, Mike Thorne, Nafi Toksöz, Vincent Tong, Elizabeth Turtle, Slava Turyshev, Roman Wawrzazek, Renee Weber, Jonathan Weinberg, Ben Weiss, Mark Wieczorek, James Williams, Maria Zuber
The Rationale for Deployment of a Long-Lived Geophysical Network on the Moon This paper outlines the rationale establishing a global lunar geophysical network and the authorship demonstrates the broad community support for such an endeavor, both within the USA and internationally. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Notre Dame Download File

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Alan Tokunaga

Co-Authors: S.J. Bus, J.T. Rayner, E.V. Tollestrup
The NASA Infrared Telescope Facility This white paper describes the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, its capabilities, and its role in current and future research in planetary astronomy. None of the above. University of Hawaii Download File

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Stephen M. Merkowitz

Co-Authors: Edward Aaron, Neil Ashby, David Carrier, Douglas Currie, John J. Degnan, Simone Dell’Agnello, Giovanni Delle Monache, Jan McGarry, Thomas W. Murphy, Jr., Kenneth Nordtvedt, Robert D. Reasenberg, Slava G. Turyshev, James G. Williams, Thomas Zagwodzki
The Moon as a Test Body for General Relativity This whitepaper describes how the next generation of lunar laser ranging addresses four key gravitational science questions. In addition, we discuss the current state of retroreflector technology and describe ways in which further advances can be made in laser ranging technologies. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Steven Howe

Co-Authors: Brian Gross, Jeff Katalenich, Robert O’Brien, Logan Sailer
The Mars Hopper: Long Range Mobile Platform Powered by Martian In-Situ Resources The CSNR is designing an instrumented platform that can acquire detailed data at hundreds of locations during its 10 year lifetime - a Mars Hopper. By accumulating thermal power from a radioisotope source, the platform will be able to “hop” from one location to the next every 2-3 days with a separa Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Idaho National Laboratory Download File

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Georgiana Young Kramer

Co-Authors: David Blewett, Lon Hood, Jasper Halekas, Sarah Noble, Bernard Ray Hawke, Gunther Kletetschka, Erika Harnett, and Ian Garrick-Bethell
The Lunar Swirls The lunar swirls are high albedo curvilinear surface features coincident with regions of strong remanent magnetism. Investigating the lunar swirls is important to understand the Earth-Moon system, the interaction of planetary surfaces with the solar wind, and how to best explore our solar system. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Bear Fight Center Download File

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Clive R. Neal

Co-Authors: Brad Bailey, Dave Beaty, Mary Sue Bell, Mike Duke, Paul Eckert, John Gruener, Jeff Jones, Robert Kelso, David Kring, Dan Lester, Paul Neitzel, Lewis Peach, Neal Pellis, Mike Ramsey, Debra Reiss-Bubenheim, James Rice, Gerald Sanders, Kurt Sacksteder, Greg Schmidt, Charles Shearer, Kelly Snook, Jim Spann, Paul Spudis, George Tahu, G. Jeffrey Taylor, Lawrence Taylor, Jeff Volosin, Michael Wargo
The Lunar Exploration Roadmap. Exploring the Moon in the 21st Century: Themes, Goals, Objectives, Investigations, and Priorities, 2009 This paper summarizes the long term Lunar Exploration Roadmap that has been developed by the lunar community and coordinated by the Lunar Exploration Analysis Group. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Notre Dame Download File

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W. M. Farrell

Co-Author: Mihaly Horanyi
The Lunar Dusty Exosphere: The Extreme Case of an Inner Planetary Atmosphere The Moon is an extreme type of atmosphere – a surface bounded exosphere – and may represent the final ‘ground state’ of any geologically dormant body. Neutral gas and dust are emitted from its surface via universal processes believed to be occurring at all near-airless bodies. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / University of Colorado Download File

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Jeffrey R. Johnson

Co-Authors: B. Archinal, R. Kirk, L. Gaddis, J. Anderson, B. Bussey, R. Beyer, L. Bleamaster, W. Patterson, J. Gillis-Davis, T. Watters, P. Schenk, B. Denevi
The Importance of a Planetary Cartography Program: Status and Recommendations for NASA 2013-2023 We describe 7 areas where greater attention should be paid to data returned from planetary missions, beyond minimum “mission success”. The alternative is duplication of efforts and greater chances for errors, thereby diminishing the cost return and scientific potential provided by planetary data. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. United States Geological Survey Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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