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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Karla B. Clark Europa Jupiter System Mission The baseline EJSM architecture consists the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). Complementary instruments monitor dynamic phenomena, map the Jovian magnetosphere and its interactions with the Galilean satellites, and characterize water oceans beneat Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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David H. Atkinson

Co-Authors: Thomas R. Spilker, Linda Spilker, Tony Colaprete, Tibor Balint, Robert Frampton, Sushil Atreya, Athena Coustenis, Jeff Cuzzi, Kim Reh, Ethiraj Venkatapathy, Y. Alibert, N. K. Alonge, S. Asmar, G. Bampasidis, K.H. Baines, D. Banfield, J. Barnes, R. Beebe , B. Bezard, G. Bjoraker, B. Buffington, E. Chester, A. Christou, P. DeSai, M.W. Evans, L.N. Fletcher, J. Fortney, R. Gladstone, T. Guillot, M. Hedman, G. Herdrich, M. Hofstadter, A. Howard, R. Hueso, H. Hwang, A. Ingersoll, B. Kazeminejad, J.-P. Lebreton, M. Leese, R. Lorenz, P. Mahaffy, E. Martinez, B. Marty, J. Moses, O. Mousis, G. Orton, M. Patel, S. Pogrebenko, P. Read, S. Rodriguez, H. Salo, J. Schmidt, A. Sole, P. Steffes, P. Withers
Entry Probe Missions to the Giant Planets It is recommended that probe missions to the giant planets be performed to help constrain models of solar system formation and the origin and evolution of atmospheres, to provide a basis for comparative studies of the gas and ice giants, and to provide a valuable link to extrasolar planetary systems Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. University of Idaho Download File

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Ian Garrick-Bethell

Co-Authors: Cassandra Runyon, Carle Pieters, Michael Wyatt, Peter Isaacson, Linda Elkins-Tanton
Ensuring United States Competitiveness in the 21st Century Global Economy with a Long-Term Lunar Exploration Program A focused Lunar Exploration Program can help retain United States economic and strategic leadership in the 21st century. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Brown University Download File

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Peter Tsou

Co-Authors: Donald E. Brownlee, Isik Kanic, Christophe Sotin, Linda J. Spilker, Nathan Strange, Joseph Vellinga
Enceladus Flyby Sample Return, LIFE (Life Investigation For Enceladus) One of the most significant discoveries made by the Cassini Mission was finding water ice particles containing organic compounds in the plume emanating from the south pole of Enceladus. Several theories for the origin of life on Earth would also apply to Enceladus. Therefore, it should be of utmos Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Robert Grimm Electromagnetic Sounding of Solid Planets and Satellites EM methods can sense subsurface structure from meters to a thousand kilometers. This white paper gives a tutorial on material sensitivities, exploration depths, sources, and particularly what measurements must be made for different target bodies, without specific mission endorsements. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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Saumitra Mukherjee Effect of Star-burst on Sun-Earth environment Starbursts produces extragalactic cosmic rays which initiate the Sun to develop low Planetary Indices (Kp) and low Electron flux (E-flux) condition of Sun-Earth Environment which leads to snowfall on earth and some changes in other plants of the solar system Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jawaharlal Nehru University Download File

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Glenn Orton

Co-Authors: Glenn Orton, Padma Yanamandra-Fisher, Leigh Fletcher, Kevin Baines, Imke de Pater, Olivier Mousis, Jean-Pierre Lebreton, Steve Miller5, Sang-Joon Kim, Makenzie Lystrup, Kunio Sayanagi, Tom Stallard,Paul Steffes
Earth-Based Observational Support for Spacecraft Exploration of Outer-Planet Atmospheres This white paper advocates continued robust Earth-based observational support for spacecraft missions, addressing in particular investigations of Giant Planet atmospheres. Recommendations include upgrades to the NASA IRTF as well as cooperative investments in large or giant telescopes. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Andrew M. Davis

Co-Authors: Meenakshi Wadhwa, Christine Floss, Bradley L. Jolliff, Scott Messenger, Dimitri A. Papanastassiou, Allan Treiman, Andrew J. Westphal
Development of Capabilities and Instrumentation for Curation and Analysis of Returned Samples The purpose of this white paper is to emphasize the importance of investments in sample curation and analytical instrument development for the full realization of the science objectives of any sample return missions in the coming decade. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. University of Chicago Download File

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Clive R. Neal

Co-Authors: Charles K. Shearer, Meenakshi Wadwha, Lars Borg, Bradley Jolliff, Allan Treiman
Developing Sample Return Technology using the Earth''s Moon as a Testing Ground Lowering cost and risk through development of sample return technologies that can be used on various sample return mission styles is emphasized, as is using the Moon as a testing ground for such technologies. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. University of Notre Dame Download File

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Jasper Halekas

Co-Authors: M. Fuller, I. Garrick-Bethell, L. L. Hood, C. L. Johnson, K. Lawrence, R. J. Lillis, R. P. Lin, M. Manga, M. E. Purucker, B. P. Weiss
Determining the origins of lunar remanent crustal magnetism The discovery of lunar magnetic fields of crustal origin was a major scientific surprise of the Apollo program. Solving the enigma of lunar remanent crustal magnetization will provide fundamental insights into the thermal history of the lunar core/dynamo, mantle, and crust, and into the processes by which crustal magnetization is acquired on airless bodies - for instance, large basin-forming impacts. Determining the origin and history of lunar crustal magnetism will require the return of oriented samples... Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of California Berkeley Download File

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Reta F. Beebe

Co-Authors: Charles Acton, Raymond Arvidson, Jim Bell, Dan Boice, Scott Bolton, Steven Bougher, William Boynton, Daniel Britt, Marc Buie, Joseph Burns, Maria Teresa Capria, Angioletta Coradini, Daniel Crichton, Peter Ford, Richard French, Lisa Gaddis, Peter Gierasch, Randy Gladstone, Mitch Gordon, Ronald Greeley, Kenneth Hansen, Jakosky, Bruce, Yasumara Kasaba, Krishan Khurana, William Kurth, Emil Law, Ralph Lorenz, Conor Nixon, Chris Paranicus, Wayne Pryor, Thomas Roatsch, Chris Russell, Gerhard Schwehm, Richard Simpson, Mark Sykes, Dave Tholen, Raymond Walker, Paul Withers, Joseph Zender
Data Management, Preservation and the Future of PDS This paper summarizes the history, evolution and current status of analysis and archiving of planetary science data. It presents goals for PDS 2010, a revised PDS, and addresses conditions needed to achieve those goals. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. New Mexico State University Download File

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Brad Jolliff

Co-Authors: Noah Petro, Leon Alkalai, Carlton Allen, Irene Antonenko, Lars Borg, William Bottke, Barbara Cohen, Michael Duke, Amy Fagan, Bernard Foing, Lisa Gaddis, John Gruener, Justin Hagerty, James Head III, Harold Hiesinger, Peter Isaacson, Randy Korotev, Georgiana Kramer, Samuel Lawrence, Gary Lofgren, Tomas Magna, Clive Neal, Marc Norman, Larry Nyquist, Gordon Osinski, Dimitri Papanastassiou, Carle Pieters, Bhairavi Shankar, Tim Swindle, G. Jeffrey Taylor, Allan Treiman, Paul Warren, Mark Wieczorek, Ryan Zeigler, Nicolle Zellner
Constraining Solar System impact history and evolution of the terrestrial planets with exploration of and samples from the Moon’s South Pole-Aitken Basin A fundamental issue of Solar System science is determining the early history of the terrestrial planets, including giant impact bombardment and the evolution of differentiated crust. Exploration and sampling of the Moon’s South Pole–Aitken Basin can illuminate these formative planetary processes. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Washington University, Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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David Grinspoon

Co-Authors: Mark Bullock, James Kasting, Janet Luhmann, Peter Read, Scot Rafkin, Sanjay Limaye, Kevin McGouldrick, Gordon Chin, Samuel Gulkis, Feng Tian, Eric Chassefiere, Hakan Svedhem, Vikki Meadows
Comparative Planetary Climate Studies It is the purpose of this White Paper to draw attention to, and summarize, the important role that planetary exploration, and research with a comparative planetology focus, have played and should continue to play in our understanding of climate, and climate change, on Earth. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Denver Museum of Nature & Science Download File

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Linda Spilker

Co-Authors: Robert Pappalardo, Robert Mitchell, Michel Blanc, Robert Brown, Jeff Cuzzi, Michele Dougherty, Charles Elachi, Larry Esposito, Michael Flasar, Daniel Gautier, Tamas Gombosi, Donald Gurnett, Arvydas Kliore, Stamatios Krimigis, Jonathan Lunine, Tobias Owen, Carolyn Porco, Francois Raulin, Laurence Soderblom, Ralf Srama, Darrell Strobel, Hunter Waite, David Young
Cassini-Huygens Solstice Mission Understanding the Saturn system has been greatly enhanced by the Cassini-Huygens mission. The proposed 7-year Cassini Solstice Mission would address new questions that have arisen during the mission, and observe seasonal and temporal change in the Saturn system to prepare for future missions. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Andrew F. Cheng

Co-Authors: Andrew Rivkin, Patrick Michel, Carey Lisse, Kevin Walsh, Keith Noll, Darin Ragozzine, Clark Chapman, William Merline, Lance Benner, Daniel Scheeres
Binary and Multiple Systems A sizable fraction of small bodies is found in binary or multiple systems. Understanding the formation processes of such systems is critical to understanding collisional and dynamical evolution. Missions can offer enhanced science return if they target binaries or multiples. [FINAL version] Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Laboratory Download File

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Eliot F. Young

Co-Authors: Charles Hibbitts, Joshua Emery, Amanda Hendrix, William Merline, William Grundy, Kurt Retherford
Balloon-Borne Telescopes for Planetary Science: Imaging and Photometry This white paper advocates the use of balloon-borne telescopes for diffraction-limited imaging in visible wavelengths by demonstrating their technical readiness and low cost relative to space- and ground-based facilities. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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Michael Mischna

Co-Authors: Michael Smith, Rob Kursinski, Don Banfield
Atmospheric Science Research Priorities for Mars This paper addresses the exploration of the martian atmosphere, and focuses on broad atmospheric science goals that can be obtained from orbit. It presents the key questions in atmospheric science that remain unanswered, and what progress can be made towards answering them in the coming decade. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Oleksandr Potashko Atmosphere as Sign of Life Is there a feature of presence of life on a macro-level? Could we say something about life on Neptune or on Halley’s Comet or on an exoplanet? Let’s consider that sign of life is an atmosphere. Let''s consider crustal planet. Whether planet has an atmosphere we may say that it is alive in geologi Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. SF ''Fractal'' Download File

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Nathan J. Strange

Co-Authors: Daniel Scheeres, Ryan Russell, Kathleen Howell, James Longuski, Victoria Coverstone, David B. Spencer, Cesar Ocampo, Belinda Marchand, Terry Alfriend, John Junkins, Daniele Mortari, John Crassidis, Landis Markley, David Folta, John Dankanich, Shyam Bhaskaran, Dennis Byrnes, Kim Reh, Martin Lo, Jon Sims, John C. Smith, Brent Buffington, Anastassios Petropoulos, Damon Landau, Fernando Abilleira, Ryan Park, Jeffrey Parker, Julie Bellerose, Stefano Campagnola, Andrew Klesh, Nitin Arora, Diane Craig Davis, Kevin Kloster, Alfred Lynam, Geoff Wawrzyniak
Astrodynamics Research and Analysis Funding Funding for astrodynamics research has been largely limited to the development and operations phases of missions. Early funding for astrodynamics research would produce new techniques prior to formulation of missions, which could lead to novel and exciting concepts. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Olga Prieto Ballesteros

Co-Authors: Kevin P. Hand, Ariel Anbar, Felipe Gómez-Gómez, Oleg Korablev, Ralph Lorenz, Ralph Milliken, Daniel Prieur, Francois Raulin, Steve Vance, Michel Viso
Astrobiology in Europa and Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) This paper describe the Astrobiology science in EJSM and the opportunities of having in situ elements in future missions. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Centro de Astrobiología-INTA-CSIC Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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