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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Harrison H. Schmitt Lunar Pyroclastic Deposits and the Origin of the Moon he primary difficulty in accepting the computer modeled "giant impact" hypothesis for the origin of the Moon, versus independent derivation, comes from the analysis of the non-glass components of lunar pyroclastic deposits. These prove that volatile reservoirs exist in the mantle of the Moon. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Wisconsin-Madison Download File

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Dana M. Hurley

Co-Authors: David J. Lawrence, Raul Baragiola, D. Benjamin Bussey, Anthony Colaprete, M. Darby Dyar, Anthony F. Egan, Richard C. Elphic, William Farrell, William Feldman, James R. Gaier, Jacob Grimes, Jasper S. Halekas, Erika Harnett, James N. Head, Jennifer Heldmann, Amanda Hendrix, Charles A. Hibbitts, Kurt D. Retherford, Catherine Neish, Sarah Noble, Carle Pieters, Paul D. Spudis, Timothy J. Stubbs, Bradley J. Thomson, Kris Zacny
Lunar Polar Volatiles and Associated Processes A landed/mobile mission to a lunar permanently shadowed region (PSR) should identify the composition, abundance, and distribution of volatiles in lunar PSRs. The next step is obtaining a detailed understanding of the transport/deposition/retention system to unravel the history of polar volatiles. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Laboratory Download File

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Richard S. Miller

Co-Authors: M. Bonamente, S. O’Brien, W. S. Paciesas, M. Bonamente, S. O’Brien, W. S. Paciesas, C. A. Young, D. Ebbets
Lunar Occultation Observer - A Nuclear Astrophysics Mission Concept using the Moon as a Platform for Science The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) is a gamma-ray astrophysics mission concept being developed to probe the nuclear regime. Using the Moon to occult astrophysical sources as they rise and set along the lunar limb, the encoded temporal modulation will be used to image the sky and enable science. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. None of the above. University of Alabama in Huntsville Download File

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Amalie Sinclair Lunar Light -Planetary Renewal- A Holistic Viewpoint This paper sets out some rationales for an integrated US space development platform within the UN forums . Such a platform might include for an international lunar settlement and for a related space sciences initiative into global development Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Space for Progress Download File

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Harrison H. Schmitt

Co-Authors: Mark W. Henley, Kim Kuhlman, Gerald. L. Kulcinski, John F. Santarius, Lawrence A. Taylor
Lunar Helium-3 Fusion Resource Distribution The Moon''s regolith contains vast resources of helium-3, an ideal fuel for terrestrial fusion power systems. Development of plans for private sector investment in obtaining helium-3 and its by-products requires detailed definition of that isotope''s selenographic distribution. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Wisconsin-Madison Download File

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Harrison H. Schmitt

Co-Authors: Bernard H. Foing, Mark Helper, Friedrich P. Horz, Jeff Plescia, Authur Snoke, Kris Zacny
Lunar Field Geological Exploration Geological exploration by experience and highly trained field geologists provides the foundation for interpretation of lunar samples in the context of the origin and evolution of the terrestrial planets. Future lunar exploration should fully utilize the best available field geologists. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Wisconsin-Madison Download File

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Andrew Pohorille

Co-Authors: Leslie Bebout, Devaki Bhaya, Rocco Mancinelli
Limits of Terrestrial Life in Space To pursue a better understanding of life in space and link it to future missions we propose a strategy aimed at determining the potential for terrestrial microbial life to adapt and evolve in space environments. This strategy involves ground-based research, small satellite missions and will culminat None of the above. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Rhawn Joseph Life on Earth Came From Other Planets - 7 Page Summary/Press release If life were to appear on a desert island we wouldn''t claim it was assembled in an organic soup or created by God; we''d conclude it washed to shore or fell from the sky. The Earth too, is an island, orbiting in a sea of space and this is how life on our planet began. None of the above. BrainMind.com Download File

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Rhawn Joseph Life on Earth Came From Other Planets Life on Earth Came From Other Planets, reviews the evidence presented in over 100 peer reviewed scientific papers published in prestigious scientific journals, and explains how life on Earth originated on other planets. The entire 45 page paper will be published in the journal, Cosmology, on 12/2009 None of the above. BrainMind.com Download File

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S. W. Ruff

Co-Authors: S. W. Ruff, J. B. Dalton, J. L. Bishop, M. D. Dyar, T. Glotch, W. M. Grundy, V. E. Hamilton, J. R. Johnson, F. Marchis, R. M. Mastrapa, F. M. McCubbin, R. V. Morris, H. Nekvasil, M. S. Ramsey, D. Stillman, S. T. Stewart, S. K. Sharma, A. Wang, and R. C. Wiens
Laboratory Studies in Support of Planetary Surface Composition Investigations This paper demonstrates the need to support laboratory investigations related to the surface composition of planetary bodies Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Arizona State University Download File

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Julie Castillo-Rogez

Co-Authors: William B. Durham, Essam Heggy, Mathieu Choukroun, Jerome Noir, Sarah T. Stewart, Steve D. Vance, Christine M. McCarthy, Martin B. Barmatz, Pamela G. Conrad
Laboratory Studies in Support of Planetary Geophysics We summarize the rationale for advocating a healthy and sustained program of laboratory research in support of the geophysical exploration of planetary bodies. We address the challenges inherent to this discipline, and we suggest recommendations for the review panel''s consideration. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Murthy Gudipati

Co-Authors: Michael A''Hearn, Nancy Brickhouse, John Cowan, Paul Drake, Steven Federman, Gary Ferland, Adam Frank, Wick Haxton, Eric Herbst, Michael Mumma, Farid Salama, Daniel Wolf Savin, Lucy Ziurys
Laboratory Studies for Planetary Sciences The WGLA of the AAS promotes collaboration and exchange of knowledge between astronomy and planetary sciences and the laboratory sciences (physics, chemistry, and biology). Laboratory data needs of ongoing and next generation planetary science missions are carefully evaluated and recommended. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Linda R. Brown

Co-Authors: Pin Chen, Brian J. Drouin, Charles E. Miller, John Pearson, Stanley P. Sander, Keeyoon Sung, Robert A. Toth, ShanShan Yu
Laboratory Spectroscopy to Support Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Composition This paper discusses the declining state of laboratory studies that are essential to support and enable remote sensing of planetary bodies. Five recommendations are given to improve this situation. None of the above. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Vincent F. Chevrier

Co-Authors: Derek Sears, Megan Elwood Madden, Essam Heggy
Laboratory Measurements in Support of Present and Future Missions to Mars The case is made that supporting laboratory measurements and facilities should be considered an integral element of the Nation’s Mars exploration program, since they provide a meaningful interpretation of the returned data, validation of theoretical models, and calibration of instruments. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Arkansas Center for Space and Planetary Science Download File

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Candice Hansen

Co-Authors: J.A. Stansberry, A.S. Aljabri, D. Banfield, E.B. Bierhaus, M. Brown, J. E. Colwell, M. Dougherty, A.R. Hendrix, K. Khurana, D. Landau, A. McEwen, D.A. Paige, C. Paranicas, C.M. Satter, B. Schmidt, M. Showalter, T. Spilker, L.J. Spilker, N. Strange, M. Tiscareno, W.M. Grundy, N. Haghighipour, K.S. Noll, E. Schaller, S. Sheppard
KBO Science with Argo - A Voyage through the Outer Solar System Argo is an innovative pragmatic concept for a New Frontiers 4 mission which exploits an upcoming launch window that permits a close Triton encounter during a flyby through the Neptune system, and then continues on to a scientifically-selected Kuiper Belt Object. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Leigh N. Fletcher

Co-Authors: G. Orton, T. Stallard, K. Baines, K. M. Sayanagi, F. J. Martin-Torres, M. Hofstadter, I. de Pater, S. Edgington, R. Morales-Juberias, T. Livengood, D. Huestis, P. Hartogh, D.H. Atkinson, J. Moses, M. Wong, U. Dyudina, A.J. Friedson, T.R. Spilker, R.T. Pappalardo, P.G.J. Irwin, N. Teanby, T. Cavalié, O. Mousis, A.P. Showman, X. Liu, M.B. Lystrup, S. Gulkis, T. Greathouse, R. K. Achterberg, G.L. Bjoraker, S.S. Limaye, P. Read, D. Gautier, D.S. Choi, T. Kostiuk, A.F. Nagy, D. Huestis, M. Choukroun, I. Muller-Wodarg, P. Yanamandra-Fisher
Jupiter Atmospheric Science in the Next Decade We outline atmospheric science goals and requirements for Jupiter in the next decade exploration (Juno, EJSM, Observatories, probes) in 5 themes: formation and evolution, weather-layer dynamics, coupling with the interior, interactions with the external environment and time-variable phenomena. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Michael D. Max

Co-Authors: Stephen M. Clifford, Arthur H. Johnson, Jeremie Lasue
Is a Resource-Mars a Stepping-Stone to Human Exploration of the Solar System? Methane and water on Mars are the key to a resource base to support sustainable exploration of Mars and beyond Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. MDS Research, LLC Download File

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Brian J. O''Brien

Co-Author: James R.Gaier
Indicative Basic Issues about Lunar Dust in the Lunar Environment Basic issues of lunar dust - including recent discoveries -so fundamental they affect a wide range of lunar research and exploration must be recognised as priorities. Four Recommendations and Outcomes are given. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Western Australia Download File

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Eberhard Gruen

Co-Authors: Frank Postberg, Harald Krüger, Mihaly Horanyi, Elmar Jessberger Sascha Kempf, Ralf Srama, Thomas Stephan, Zoltan Sternovsky
In-Situ Mass Spectrometry of Atmosphereless Planetary Objects Dust particles emitted from atmosphereless planetary objects are samples of their surfaces. By mass analyzing these particles and tracing back their trajectories to their sources the surface composition of Mercury, planetary satellites, dusty rings sources, asteroids and comets can be obtained. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. LASP, University of Colorado Download File

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Mian M. Abbas

Co-Authors: A.C. LeClair, D. Tankosic, P.D. Craven, J.F. Spann, E.A. West
Importance of Measurements of Charging Properties of Individual Submicron Size Lunar Dust Grains It is absolutely necessary and of utmost importance to conduct the proposed measurements of charging properties of individual Apollo 11-17 submicron size dust grains by UV radiation and electron impact, at the lunar thermal cycle, for developing any believable lunar dust transportation models. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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