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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Andrew Daga

Co-Authors: Carlton Allen, James Burke, Ian Crawford, Richard Leveille, Steven Simon, Lin Tze Tan
Lunar and Martian Lava Tube Exploration as Part of an Overall Scientific Survey This paper discusses the opportunity to search for and exploit lava tubes on the surfaces of the Moon and Mars as a means of enabling ambitious planetary science missions. [FINAL VERSION] Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Andrew Daga & Associates LLC Download File

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Lisa Pratt

Co-Authors: Carl Allen, Abby Allwood, Ariel Anbar, Sushil Atreya, Mike Carr, Dave Des Marais, Daniel Glavin, John Grant, Vicky Hamilton, Ken Herkenhoff, Vicky Hipkin, Tom McCollom, Scott McLennan, Ralph Milliken, Doug Ming, Gian Gabrielle Ori, John Parnell, Francois Poulet (Univ. Paris), Barbara Sherwood Lollar, Frances Westall, David Beaty, Joy Crisp, Chris Salvo, Charles Whetsel, Mike Wilson
Mars Astrobiology Explorer-Cacher (MAX-C): A Potential Rover Mission for 2018 This white paper describes a potential rover mission to Mars, with the name Mars Astrobiology Explorer-Cacher (MAX-C) that could be launched in 2018. The mission would conduct high-priority in situ science and make concrete steps towards the potential future return of martian samples to Earth. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Indiana University Download File

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Douglas Stetson

Co-Authors: Jim Bell, Lou Friedman
Mars Exploration 2016-2032: Rationale and Principles for a Strategic Program The Mars Exploration Program, one of the most visible and dynamic elements of NASA space science, is at a crossroads. To ensure a robust future it must embrace the related goals of life and sample return, and must begin to bridge the historical gap between robotic and human exploration. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. The Planetary Society (consultant) Download File

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Michael J. Kavaya Mars Orbiting Pulsed Doppler Wind Lidar for Characterization of Wind and Dust Technology is described which is well developed and on a path for space. This technology could be used in Mars orbit to provide a global climatology of wind and relative dust as a function of location and altitude. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. NASA Langley Research Center Download File

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Timothy N. Titus

Co-Authors: Thomas H. Prettyman, Timothy I. Michaels, Jeffrey Barnes, Hugh H. Kieffer, Adrian Brown, Shane Byrne, Kathryn E. Fishbaugh, Michael H. Hecht
Mars Polar Science for the Next Decade This white paper is intended to be a consensus of many of the active members of the Mars polar science community, and is the culmination of discussions held at the 3rd International Mars Polar Energy Balance and CO2 Cycle workshop (MPEB2009) held in Seattle, WA, 21-24 July 2009. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. United States Geological Survey Astrogeology Science Center Download File

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Michael D. Smith

Co-Authors: Mark Allen, Donald Banfield, Jeffrey Barnes, R. Todd Clancy, Philip James, James Kasting, Paul Wennberg, Daniel Winterhalter, Michael Wolff, Richard Zurek
Mars Trace Gas Mission: Scientific Goals and Measurement Objectives Trace gases are a sensitive indicator of current martian activity, whether photochemical or biogeochemical. A Trace Gas Mission measuring atmospheric composition, circulation and state, and locating active sources would characterize this activity and its implications for climate and astrobiology. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Robert J. Lillis

Co-Authors: J. Arkani-Hamed, D. A. Brain, J. C. Cain, J. E. P. Connerney, G. T. Delory, J. Espley, M. Fuller, J. Gattecceca, J. S. Halekas, L. L. Hood, C. L. Johnson, D. Jurdy, G. Kletetschka, B. Langlais, R. P. Lin, K. L. Louzada, M. Manga, C. Milbury, D. Mozzoni, M. Purucker, D. Ravat, J. H. Roberts, P. Rochette, C.T. Russell, S. Smrekar, S. T. Stewart, S. Vennerstrom, B. P. Weiss, K. Whaler
Mars'' Ancient Dynamo and Crustal Remanent Magnetism Mars'' crustal magnetization is unique and enigmatic. It is pertinent to Mars science questions as diverse as the structure of the interior and the evolution of climate. To study it, we recommend 1) extending the MAVEN mission, 2) rover-mounted surface magnetometers and 3) oriented sample return. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. University of California Berkeley Download File

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Larry W. Esposito Mission Concept: Venus in situ Explorer (VISE) A proposed New Frontiers mission concept for Venus lander. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. LASP, University of Colorado Download File

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Robert F. Arentz

Co-Author: Harold Reitsema
NEO Survey: An Efficient Search for Near-Earth Objects by an IR Observatory in a Venus like Orbit We present a conceptual design based on high-heritage flight systems from the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Kepler mission which will find 90% of all 140-meter NEOS in 7 years after launch, and by 2020, if started soon. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp. Download File

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Eldar Z. Noe Dobrea

Co-Authors: S. Murchie, J.F. Mustard, J.L. Bishop, N.K. McKeown
Near-Infrared imaging spectroscopy of the surface of Mars at meter-scales to constrain the geological origin of hydrous alteration products, identify candidate sites and samples for future in-situ and sample return missions, and guide rover operations Near-infrared imaging spectrometers capable of mapping hydrous minerals on the surface of Mars at meter-scales from orbit, as well as hypespectral NIR imagers on landed rovers not only enhance the scientific return of orbital and rover missions, but will be critical in guiding future rover operation Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Planetary Science Institute Download File

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Linda J. Spilker

Co-Authors: C. J. Hansen, N. Albers, A. S. Aljabri, D. Banfield, E. B. Bierhaus, M. Brown, J. E. Colwell, C. Chavez, F. Crary, I. de Pater, M. Dougherty, C. Ferrari, G. Filacchione, R. French, M. Gordon, E. Gruen, M. Hedman, A. R. Hendrix, M. Horanyi, G. Hospodarsky, A. Ingersoll, Sasha Kempf, K. Khurana, B. Kurth, D. Landau, J. Lissauer, E. Marouf, A. McEwen, D. A. Paige, C. Paranicas, F. Postberg, N. Rappaport, H. Salo, C. M. Satter, B. Schmidt, M. Showalter, T. R. Spilker, J. Stansberry, N. Strange, M. S. Tiscareno, P. Yanamandra-Fisher
Neptune Ring Science with Argo - A Voyage through the Outer Solar System Argo, an innovative concept for a New Frontiers 4 mission, will yield significant advances in our understanding of evolutionary processes of rings and small bodies in the outer Solar System by executing a flyby through the Neptune system, then going on to a scientifically-selected KBO. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Candice Hansen

Co-Authors: A.S.Aljabri, D.Banfield, E.B.Bierhaus, M.Brown, J.E.Colwell, M.Dougherty, A.R.Hendrix, A.Ingersoll, K.Khurana, D.Landau, A.McEwen, D.A.Paige, C.Paranicas, C.M.Satter, B.Schmidt, M.Showalter, L.J.Spilker, T.Spilker, J.Stansberry, N.Strange, M.Tiscareno
Neptune Science with Argo - A Voyage through the Outer Solar System Argo is an innovative pragmatic concept for a New Frontiers 4 mission which exploits an upcoming launch window that permits a close Triton encounter during a flyby through the Neptune system, and then continues on to a scientifically-selected Kuiper Belt Object. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Robert J. Noble

Co-Authors: Rashied Amini, Patricia M. Beauchamp, Gary L. Bennett, John R. Brophy, Bonnie J. Buratti, Joan Ervin, Yan R. Fernandez, Will Grundy, Mohammed Omair Khan, David Q. King, Jared Lang, Karen J. Meech, Alan Newhouse, Steven R. Oleson, George R. Schmidt, Thomas Spilker, John L. West
New Opportunities for Outer Solar System Science using Radioisotope Electric Propulsion This whitepaper discusses how mobility provided by radioisotope electric propulsion (REP) opens up entirely new science opportunities for robotic missions to distant primitive bodies. We also give an overview of REP technology developments and the required next steps to realize REP. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Download File

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Yasunori Miura New lunar science and engineering with carbon cycle. New idea and technique with carbon cycle can be applied at lunar crust origin, lunar interior and lunar double construction (surfae and underground) building at the lunar base in future from new carbon-fixing cycle. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Earth & Planet. Material Sci., Yamaguchi University Download File

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Michael Hecht

Co-Authors: Kathryn Fishbaugh, Shane Byrne, Ken Herkenhoff, Stephen Clifford, Timothy N. Titus, Oded Aharonson
Next Steps in Mars Polar Science: In Situ Subsurface Exploration of the North Polar Layered Deposits The polar regions of Mars represent a unique environment for determining the mechanisms of martian climate change over geological time. Using terrestrial paleoclimatology methods, subsurface access to the polar layer deposits should be a high priority for future Mars exploration. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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James T. Struck Nobel Prize in Physics and Chemistry Could Be Awarded to Almost Anyone Who Has Done Any work In fields Including me Almost anyone with work in chemistry and physics could be awarded the Nobel Prize; me too. Many contributions in chemistry and physics go on for several pages. The work of many are not recognized when the award is given to 1 or 2 people. Award could be given to any finding, article or discovery. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. None of the above. A French American Museum of Chicago, Dinosaurs, Trees, Religion and Galaxies, Inc. Download File

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Harrison H. Schmitt Observations Necessary for Useful Global Climate Models Critical differences exist between scientists who observe weather and climate and those who attempt to model nature’s complexities. The modelers believe complex mathematics and broad assumptions can forecast the future of climate, Earth’s most complex system. Long-term observation is essential. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Wisconsin-Madison Download File

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Arlin Crotts On Lunar Volatiles and Their Importance to Resource Utilization and Lunar Science We discuss recent, compelling evidence for major lunar volatiles not necessarily found in polar permanently-shadowed crater cold traps, but originating from the deep interior. We also discuss programs underway to study lunar volatiles, which unfortunately fall far short of the NRC''s SCEM goals. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Columbia University Download File

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David R. Thompson

Co-Authors: David R. Thompson, Robert C. Anderson, Benjamin Bornstein, Nathalie A. Cabrol, Steve Chien, Tara Estlin, Terry Fong, Robert Hogan, Ralph Lorenz, Daniel Gaines, Martha S. Gilmore, Mario Parente, Liam Pedersen, Ted L. Roush, Giuseppe Marzo, David Wettergreen
Onboard Science Data Analysis: Implications for Future Missions Onboard science data analysis enables new spacecraft operational modes that improve science yield. It can relieve constraints on time, bandwidth and power, and respond automatically to events on short time scales. We examine applications to rover, aerobot, and orbital platforms. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Jonathan J. Fortney

Co-Authors: Kevin Zahnle, Isabelle Baraffe, Adam Burrows, Sarah E. Dodson-Robinson, Gilles Chabrier, Tristan Guillot, Ravit Helled, Franck Hersant, William B. Hubbard, Jack J. Lissauer, Mark S. Marley
Planetary Formation and Evolution Revealed with a Saturn Entry Probe: The Importance of Noble Gases The determination of Saturn’s atmospheric noble gas abundances are critical to understanding the formation and evolution of Saturn, and giant planets in general. These measurements can only be performed with an entry probe. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. University of California, Santa Cruz Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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Last Updated: 9 Apr 2012