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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Cynthia Phillips

Co-Authors: D. L. Blaney, R. T. Pappalardo, H. Hussman, G. C. Collins, R. M. Mastrapa, J. F. Cooper, R. Greeley, J. B. Dalton, T. A. Hurford, E. B. Bierhaus, F. Nimmo, D. A. Williams, D. A. Senske , D. Grinspoon, R. E. Johnson, S. Kattenhorn, P. Hayne, B. Betts, W. B. McKinnon, L. M. Prockter, A. P. Showman, J. H. Shirley, K. Khurana, S. Grasby, B. G. Bills, L. Friedman, J. Castillo, C. Sotin, G. Hansen, K. Klaus, B. J. Buratti, S. W. Asmar, M. J. S. Belton, E. Heggy, L. Sklar, A. R. Hendrix, J. R. Spear, S. Ulamec, L. Bruzzone, F. Tosi, R. Jaumann, G. Strazzulla, A. Coates, J. Emery, L. Allamandola, A. Coustenis, R. W. Carlson, W. Grundy, S. D. Vance, G. Branduardi-Raymont, M. Barmatz, P. M. Beauchamp, A. D. Anbar, C. A. Raymond, K. P. Hand, E. Shock, K. Stephan, D. L. Goldsby, D. D. Blankenship, M. Choukroun, W. Moore, E. P. Turtle, T. Pierson, S. Neuer, M. Zolotov
Exploration of Europa Europa''s icy surface may hide an ocean of liquid water. We summarize the unanswered questions pertaining to Europa following the Galileo mission, and address how those questions will be answered by suggested missions such as EJSM and a lander, as well as new telescopic and laboratory measurements. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. SETI Institute Download File

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William F. Bottke

Co-Authors: Carlton Allen, Mahesh Anand, Nadine Barlow, Donald Bogard, Gwen Barnes, Clark Chapman, Barbara A. Cohen, Ian A. Crawford, Andrew Daga, Luke Dones, Dean Eppler, Vera Assis Fernandes, Bernard H. Foing, Lisa R. Gaddis, Jim N. Head, Fredrick P. Horz, Brad Jolliff, Christian Koeberl, Michelle Kirchoff, David Kring, Harold F., Levison, Simone Marchi, Charles Meyer, David A. Minton, Stephen J. Mojzsis, Clive Neal, Laurence E. Nyquist, David Nesvorny, Anne Peslier, Noah Petro, Carle Pieters, Jeff Plescia, Mark Robinson, Greg Schmidt, Sen. Harrison H. Schmitt, John Spray, Sarah Stewart-Mukhopadhyay, Timothy Swindle, Lawrence Taylor, Ross Taylor, Mark Wieczorek, Nicolle Zellner, Maria Zuber
Exploring the Bombardment History of the Moon We discuss our priorities for exploring the Moon''s bombardment history: (1) Test the idea of a massive impactor spike 3.8-4.0 billion years ago. (2) Anchor the early Earth-Moon impact flux curve by determining the age of South Pole-Aitken Basin. (3) Establish a precise absolute chronology. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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Bruce A. Campbell

Co-Authors: John A. Grant, Ted Maxwell, Jeffrey J. Plaut, Anthony Freeman
Exploring the Shallow Subsurface of Mars with Imaging Radar: Scientific Promise and Technical Rationale Global information on martian near-surface features and physical properties represents a great untapped aspect of the search for habitable zones and evidence of past climate. Imaging radar measurements can penetrate several meters of mantling material and 10’s of meters into ice. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Smithsonian Institution Download File

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Marc Fries

Co-Authors: John Armstrong, James Ashley, Luther Beegle, Timothy Jull, Glenn Sellar
Extralunar Materials in Lunar Regolith This paper describes the scientific rationale for locating and studying extralunar material found in lunar regolith. The extreme age and lack of weathering of lunar regolith make it a natural repository for samples from a wide range of parent bodies and across a vast span of solar system history. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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David A. Williams

Co-Authors: Jani Radebaugh, Rosaly M.C. Lopes, Imke de Pater, Nicholas M. Schneider, Frank Marchis, Julianne Moses, Ashley G. Davies, Jason Perry, Jeffrey S. Kargel, Laszlo P. Keszthelyi, Chris Paranicas, Alfred S. McEwen, Kandis Lea Jessup, David Goldstein, Melissa Bunte, Julie Rathbun, Melissa McGrath, Krishan Khurana, Sébastien Rodriguez, Terry A. Hurford, Amanda R. Hendrix, Michelle Kirchoff, Elizabeth Turtle
Future Io Exploration for 2013-2022 and Beyond, Part 1: Justification and Science Objectives This white paper (revised draft) summarizes the current scientific questions regarding Jupiter''s volcanic moon Io, and the scientific objectives and measurements that need to be accomplished by future exploration. (Final version with additional coauthors). Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Arizona State University Download File

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David A. Williams

Co-Authors: Jani Radebaugh, Rosaly M.C. Lopes, Imke de Pater, Nicholas M. Schneider, Frank Marchis, Julianne Moses, Ashley G. Davies, Jason Perry, Jeffrey S. Kargel, Laszlo P. Keszthelyi, Chris Paranicas, Alfred S. McEwen, Kandis Lea Jessup, David Goldstein, Melissa Bunte, Julie Rathbun, Melissa McGrath, Krishan Khurana, Sébastien Rodriguez, Terry A. Hurford, Amanda R. Hendrix, Michelle Kirchoff
Future Io Exploration for 2013-2022 and Beyond, Part 2: Recommendations for Missions This revised white paper lists our recommendations for mission concepts and instruments to accomplish the science objectives for future exploration of Jupiter''s moon Io for the decade of 2013-2022 and beyond. (Final version with additional coauthors). Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Arizona State University Download File

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John Grant

Co-Authors: Matt Golombek, Alfred McEwen, Scott Murchie, Frank Seelos, John Mustard, David Des Marais, Ken Tanaka, Gian Ori, Nicolas Mangold, Kate Fishbaugh, Steve Ruff, Dawn Sumner, Brad Jolliff, Ralph Harvey
Future Mars Landing Site Selection Activities A process for identifying candidate landing sites for future missions should be started and accompanied by creation of funding to support landing site characterization activities. NASA should provide resources to existing missions to enable these activities and consider including instruments for sit Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Smithsonian Institution Download File

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Barry Geldzahler

Co-Author: Les Deutsch
Future Plans for the Deep Space Network (DSN) NASA’s Deep Space Network (DSN) is a critical part of every NASA solar system mission, serving as the entity that ties the spacecraft back to Earth and providing data from science instruments, information for navigating across the solar system, and valuable radio link science and radar observations. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Headquarters Download File

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Athena Coustenis

Co-Authors: J. Lunine, D. Matson, K. Reh, P. Beauchamp, J.-M.Charbonnier, L. Bruzzone, M.-T. Capria, A. Coates, C. Hansen, R. Jaumann, J.-P. Lebreton, R. Lopes, R. Lorenz, I. Mueller-Wodarg, F. Raulin, E. Sittler, J. Soderblom, F. Sohl, C. Sotin, T. Spilker, N. Strange, T. Tokano, E. Turtle, H. Waite, L. Gurvits, C. Nixon, T. Livengood, J. Blamont, R. Achterberg, M. Allen, C. Anderson, D. Atkinson, T. Balint, G. Bampasidis, D. Banfield, A. Bar-Nun, J. Barnes, R. Beebe, E. Bierhaus, G. Bjoraker, D. Burr, F. Crary, J. Cui, J. Elliott, M. Flasar, A. Friedson, M. Galand, D. Gautier, M. Gurwell, J. Head, M. Hirtzig, T. Hurford, T. Johnson, K. Klaus, W. Kurth, E. Lellouch, J. Martin-Torres, K. Mitchell, X. Moussas, M. Munk, C. Neish, L. Norman, B. Noyelles, G. Orton, A. Pankine, D. Pascu , E. Pencil, S. Rafkin, T. Ray, F. Rocard, S. Rodriguez, A. Solomonidou, L. Spilker, R. West, D. Williams, E. Wilson, M. Wright, V. Zivkovic
Future in situ balloon exploration of Titan’s atmosphere and surface Many of the questions remaining to be addressed after the Cassini-Huygens mission require both remote and in situ exploration. Our understanding of the lower atmosphere, surface and interior of Titan will benefit greatly from detailed investigations by a montgolfiere, reaching a variety of locations Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Paris Observatory, France Download File

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Geoffrey Collins

Co-Authors: Claudia J. Alexander, Amy C. Barr, Edward B. Bierhaus, Michael T. Bland, Veronica J. ray, Lorenzo Bruzzone, Emma Bunce, Andrew Coates, John F. Cooper, Frank Crary, Andrew J. Dombard, Gianrico Filacchione, Olivier Grasset, Gary B. Hansen, Amanda R. Hendrix, Charles A. Hibbitts, Terry A. Hurford, Hauke Hussmann, Ralf Jaumann, Ozgur Karatekin, Krishan K. Khurana, Michelle R. Kirchoff, Jean-Pierre Lebreton, Melissa A. McGrath, Jeffrey M. Moore, Robert T. Pappalardo, G. Wesley Patterson, Christina Plainaki, Louise M. Prockter, Kurt Retherford, James H. Roberts, Paul M. Schenk, David A. Senske, Adam P. Showman, Katrin Stephan, Federico Tosi, Roland J. Wagner
Ganymede science questions and future exploration This paper summarizes outstanding science questions about Ganymede and its place in the Jupiter system, and how further exploration would answer these questions. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Wheaton College, Massachusetts Download File

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Pamela G. Conrad

Co-Authors: F. Scott Anderson, Robert C. Anderson, William J. Brinckerhoff, Peter Doran, Victoria E. Hamilton, Joel A. Hurowitz, Alfred S. McEwan, Douglas W. Ming , Dimitri A. Papanastassiou, Timothy D. Swindle
Geochronology and Mars Exploration: Critical Measurements for 21st Century Planetary Science We present arguments for geochronology as a high scientific priority for Mars exploration in specific and planetary science in general. We also recommend funding four specific activities toward achieving technical readiness for addressing this priority. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Harrison H. Schmitt

Co-Authors: Andy Daga,Jeff Plescia
Geopolitical Context of Lunar Exploration and Settlement The Moon has attracted international attention as the current focus of peaceful competition in space. This competition has long term implications for the future of liberty on Earth. If non-democratic regimes dominate exploration and settlement of the Moon, liberty will be at risk. Only the United St Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Wisconsin-Madison Download File

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Mian. M. Abbas

Co-Authors: A.C. LeClair, D. Tankosic, D.L. Gallagher, R.B. Sheldon, E.A. West, J.C. Brasunas, D.E. Jennings
Global Distributions of Gas & Dust in the Lunar Atmosphere from Solar Infrared Absorption Measurements with a Fourier Transform Spectrometer Global Distributions of Dust & Gas in the Lunar Atmosphere may be determined most accurately with the highly sensitive technique of measurements of Solar IR Absorptions with a Infrared Spectrometer on a Lunar Orbiter, in full compliance with the NRC goal of measurements of Global Distributions. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Download File

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Michael R. Collier

Co-Authors: Thomas E. Cravens, Mats Holmstrom, James Burch, Konrad Dennerl, Herbert Gunell, David G. Sibeck, Steven Snowden, F. Scott Porter, Ina P. Robertson, Nick Omidi, Kip Kuntz, Steven Sembay, Jennifer Carter, Andrew Read, Dimitra Koutroumpa, Massimiliano Galeazzi, Susan Lepri, K.C. Hansen, Dan McCammon, Ruth Skoug, H. Kent Hills, Timothy J. Stubbs, Pavel M. Travnicek, George Fraser, Mark Lester
Global Imaging of Solar Wind-Planetary Body Interactions using Soft X-ray Cameras We show in this white paper that, with suitable instrumentation on planetary and terrestrial spacecraft, soft X-ray emission associated with the solar wind interaction with planetary neutral atoms can map out the solar wind distribution around planets, including the locations of plasma boundaries. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Anthony Wesley

Co-Authors: Glenn Orton, Padma Yanamandra-Fisher, Leigh Fletcher, Kevin Baines, Christopher Go, Makenzie Lystrup, Olivier Mousis, Imke de Pater, Jean-Pierre Lebreton, Kunio Sayanagi, Timothy Livengood, Tom Stallard, Henrik Mellin, Nigel Bannister
Ground-Based Support for Solar-System Exploration: Continuous Coverage Visible Light Imaging of Solar System Objects from a Network of Ground-Based Observatories We propose that the needs of planetary science for event-detection and time-critical observations could be well-served by a global network of low-cost remote-controlled (or autonomous) telescopes optimized for high-resolution visible light imaging of solar system targets. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Acquerra Pty Ltd. Download File

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Allan Treiman

Co-Authors: Meenakshi Wadhwa, Charles K. Shearer Jr., Glenn J. MacPherson, James J. Papike, Gerald J. Wasserburg, Christine Floss, Malcolm J. Rutherford, George J. Flynn, Dimitri Papanastassiou, Andrew Westphal, Clive Neal, John H. Jones, Ralph P. Harvey, Susanne Schwenzer
Groundbreaking Sample Return from Mars: The Next Giant Leap in Understanding the Red Planet The purpose of this white paper is to urge consideration of a groundbreaking sample return from Mars from a previously well characterized site that requires a simple mission architecture to minimize cost and engineering risk, while gaining substantial scientific return. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Lunar and Planetary Institute Download File

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Steve Vance

Co-Authors: Ariel Anbar, Donald D. Blankenship, Bonnie Buratti, Julie Castillo, Geoffrey C. Collins, James B. Dalton III, Jack Farmer, Eberhard Grun, Candice Hansen, Terry Hurford, Hauke Hussmann, Jeff Moore, Robert Pappalardo, Cynthia B. Phillips, Frank Postberg, Elizabeth Turtle, Robert Tyler
Icy Satellite Processes in the Solar System: A plurality of worlds A comprehensive strategy for Solar System exploration must identify processes common to icy worlds. Such an approach requires continued investment in discovery focused on icy satellites in the size regime 100 km and larger. We elaborate on this concept, giving specific examples and recommendations Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Michael C. Nolan

Co-Authors: Lance A. M. Benner, Marina Brozovic, Ellen S. Howell, Jean-Luc Margot
Imaging of Near-Earth Asteroids Imaging of asteroids is necessary to understand their physical structure for studies of solar system formation, impact hazard, and resources for exploration. Ground based imaging is required to study the population of asteroids. Radar imaging at Arecibo and Goldstone currently best achieve this task Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Cornell University Download File

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Mian M. Abbas

Co-Authors: A.C. LeClair, D. Tankosic, P.D. Craven, J.F. Spann, E.A. West
Importance of Measurements of Charging Properties of Individual Submicron Size Lunar Dust Grains It is absolutely necessary and of utmost importance to conduct the proposed measurements of charging properties of individual Apollo 11-17 submicron size dust grains by UV radiation and electron impact, at the lunar thermal cycle, for developing any believable lunar dust transportation models. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Download File

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Eberhard Gruen

Co-Authors: Frank Postberg, Harald Krüger, Mihaly Horanyi, Elmar Jessberger Sascha Kempf, Ralf Srama, Thomas Stephan, Zoltan Sternovsky
In-Situ Mass Spectrometry of Atmosphereless Planetary Objects Dust particles emitted from atmosphereless planetary objects are samples of their surfaces. By mass analyzing these particles and tracing back their trajectories to their sources the surface composition of Mercury, planetary satellites, dusty rings sources, asteroids and comets can be obtained. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. LASP, University of Colorado Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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Last Updated: 9 Apr 2012