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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Ethiraj Venkatapathy

Co-Authors: James Arnold,Bernard Laub, Helen H. Hwang, Christine E. Szalai, Joseph L. Conley, Jim Tibaudo, Robert Knudsen, Andrew Chambers, David Atkinson, Sushil K. Atreva, Joseph M. Vellinga, William H. Willcockson, Janine M. Thornton, Nicholas G. Smith, Richard A. Hund, John Dec, Max L. Blosser, Michelle M. Munk, Robert Maddock, Prasun N. Desai, Walter Engelund, Stephen Sandford, David A. Gilman, Steven W. Gayle, John Kowal, Christopher B. Madden, Stan Bouslog, Brian J. Remark, Donald Curry, Scott Coughlin, Adam J. Amar, Kevin H. Baines, Tibor Balint, Bernard Bienstock, George T. Chen, James A. Cutts, Jeffery L. Hall, Samad A. Hayati, Pamela J. Hoffman, Linda Spilker, Romasso P. Rivellini, Robert Manning, Eric M. Slimko, Adam D. Steltzner, Thomas Spilker, Jeffrey Umland, Charles Kiskiras, Duane Baker, Thomas Foster, Dominic Calamito, James B. Garvin, Timothy A. Sauerwein, Sharon Seipel, Lori S. Glaze, Spencer Stolis, Mark Lippold, Francis Schwind, James Thompson, Raj Narayan, Thomas Andrews, Conley Thatcher, Edwin B. Curry, John McKinney, Robert Frampton,Todd Stever, Charley Bown, William Congdon, Jennifer Congdon, Daniel M. Empey, Joe Hartman, Dinesh Prabhu, Nancy L. Mangini, Kristina A. Skokova, Margaret M. Stackpoole, Tood White, Howard Goldstein, Melmoth Covington, Robin A. Beck, Carol W. Carroll, Charles A. Smith, Deepak Bose, Anthony Colaprete, David M. Driver, Edward Martinez, Donald T. Ellerby, Matthew J. Gasch, Aga M. Goodsell, James Reuther, Sylvia M. Johnson, Dean Kontinos, Mary Livingston, Michael J. Wright, Harry Partridge, George A. Raiche, Huy K. Tran, Kerry A. Trumble
Thermal Protection System Technologies for Enabling Future Outer Planet Missions This paper discusses the capability of heritage TPS technology used on the Galileo probe and new materials required for future outer planet probe missions. A prime conclusion is that there are important issues regarding the availability of the TPS required for Outer Planet entry probes. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Ethiraj Venkatapathy

Co-Authors: Christine E. Szalai, Bernard Laub, Helen H. Hwang, Joseph L. Conley, James Arnold, Jim Tibaudo, Robert Knudsen, Andrew Chambers, David Atkinson, Sushil K. Atreva, Joseph M. Vellinga, William H. Willcockson, Janine M. Thornton, Nicholas G. Smith, Richard A. Hund, John Dec, Max L. Blosser, Michelle M. Munk, Robert Maddock, Prasun N. Desai, Walter Engelund, Stephen Sandford, David A. Gilman, Steven W. Gayle, John Kowal, Christopher B. Madden, Stan Bouslog, Brian J. Remark, Donald Curry, Scott Coughlin, Adam J. Amar, Kevin H. Baines, Tibor Balint, Bernard Bienstock, George T. Chen, James A. Cutts, Jeffery L. Hall, Samad A. Hayati, Pamela J. Hoffman, Linda Spilker, Romasso P. Rivellini, Robert Manning, Eric M. Slimko, Adam D. Steltzner, Thomas Spilker, Jeffrey Umland, Charles Kiskiras, Duane Baker, Thomas Foster, Dominic Calamito, James B. Garvin, Timothy A. Sauerwein, Sharon Seipel, Lori S. Glaze, Spencer Stolis, Mark Lippold, Francis Schwind, James Thompson, Raj Narayan, Thomas Andrews, Conley Thatcher, Edwin B. Curry, John McKinney, Robert Frampton, Todd Stever, Charley Bown, William Congdon, Jennifer Congdon, Daniel M. Empey, Joe Hartman, Dinesh Prabhu, Nancy L. Mangini, Kristina A. Skokova, Margaret M. Stackpoole, Tood White, Howard Goldstein, Melmoth Covington, Robin A. Beck, Carol W. Carroll, Charles A. Smith, Deepak Bose, Anthony Colaprete, David M. Driver, Edward Martinez, Donald T. Ellerby, Matthew J. Gasch, Aga M. Goodsell, James Reuther, Sylvia M. Johnson, Dean Kontinos, Mary Livingston, Michael J. Wright, Harry Partridge, George A. Raiche, Huy K. Tran, Kerry A. Trumble
Thermal Protection System Technologies for Enabling Future Sample Return Missions Currently available TPS materials can meet the needs of Sample Return missions with entry velocity <13 km/s. For entry velocity >13 km/s, heritage carbon phenolic is fully capable, but potentially unavailable and currently available TPS will need to be qualified. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Ethiraj Venkatapathy

Co-Authors: Helen H. Hwang, Bernard Laub, Joseph L. Conley, James Arnold, Christine E. Szalai, Jim Tibaudo, Robert Knudsen, Andrew Chambers, David Atkinson, Sushil K. Atreva, Joseph M. Vellinga, William H. Willcockson, Janine M. Thornton, Nicholas G. Smith, Richard A. Hund, John Dec,Max L. Blosser, Michelle M. Munk, Robert Maddock, Prasun N. Desai, Walter Engelund, Stephen Sandford, David A. Gilman, Steven W. Gayle, John Kowal, Christopher B. Madden, Stan Bouslog, Brian J. Remark, Donald Curry, Scott Coughlin, Adam J. Amar, Kevin H. Baines, Tibor Balint, Bernard Bienstock, George T. Chen, James A. Cutts, Jeffery L. Hall, Samad A. Hayati, Pamela J. Hoffman, Linda Spilker, Romasso P. Rivellini, Robert Manning, Eric M. Slimko, Adam D. Steltzner, Thomas Spilker, Jeffrey Umland, Charles Kiskiras, Duane Baker, Thomas Foster, Dominic Calamito, James B. Garvin, Timothy A. Sauerwein, Sharon Seipel, Lori S. Glaze, Spencer Stolis, Mark Lippold, Francis Schwind, James Thompson, Raj Narayan, Thomas Andrews, Conley Thatcher, Edwin B. Curry, John McKinney, Robert Frampton, Todd Stever, Charley Bown, William Congdon, Jennifer Congdon, Daniel M. Empey, Joe Hartman, Dinesh Prabhu, Nancy L. Mangini, Kristina A. Skokova, Margaret M. Stackpoole, Tood White, Howard Goldstein, Melmoth Covington, Robin A. Beck, Carol W. Carroll, Charles A. Smith, Deepak Bose, Anthony Colaprete, David M. Driver, Edward Martinez, Donald T. Ellerby, Matthew J. Gasch, Aga M. Goodsell, James Reuther, Sylvia M. Johnson, Dean Kontinos, Mary Livingston, Michael J. Wright, Harry Partridge, George A. Raiche, Huy K. Tran, Kerry A. Trumble
Thermal Protection System Technologies for Enabling Future Venus Exploration This paper discusses the capability of currently available TPS and the availability of heritage carbon phenolic used on the Pioneer-Venus probes. A prime conclusion is that there are important issues regarding the availability of the TPS required for future Venus entry probes. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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J. Hunter, Jr. Waite

Co-Authors: T. Brockwell, D.T. Young, W.S. Lewis, C.P. McKay, Francois Raulin, G. Schubert
Titan Lake Probe This White Paper describes the concept for a Titan Lake Probe, which could be implemented either as an element of a TSSM-type mission or as a stand-alone New Frontiers mission. The Lake Probe could be configured either as a boat or, for increased science return, as a submersible. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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Conor A. Nixon

Co-Authors: Carrie M. Anderson, F. Michael Flasar, Christophe Sotin, J. Hunter Waite Jr., V. Malathy Devi, Olivier Mousis, Kim R. Reh, Konstantinos Kalogerakis, A. James Friedson, Henry Roe, Yuk L. Yung, Valeria Cottini, Giorgos Bampasidis, Richard K. Achterberg, Nicholas A. Teanby, Gordon L. Bjoraker, Eric H. Wilson, Tilak Hewagama, Mark A. Gurwell, Roger Yelle, Mark A. Allen, Nathan J. Strange, Linda J. Spilker, Glenn Orton, Candice J. Hansen, Jason W. Barnes, Jason M. Soderblom, Vladimir B. Zivkovic, Anezina Solomonidou, David L. Huestis, Mark A. Smith, David H. Atkinson, Patrick G. J. Irwin, Mathieu Hirtzig, Simon B. Calcutt, Timothy A. Livengood, Sandrine Vinatier, Theodor Kostiuk, Antoine Jolly, Nasser Moazzen-Ahmadi, Darrell F. Strobel, Mao-Chang Liang, Patricia M. Beauchamp, Remco de Kok, Robert Pappalardo, Imke de Pater, Véronique Vuitton, Paul N. Romani, Robert A. West, Lucy H. Norman, Mary Ann H. Smith, Kathleen Mandt, Sebastien Rodriguez, Máté Ádámkovics, Jean-Marie Flaud, Kurt K. Klaus, Michael Wong, Jean-Pierre Lebreton, Neil Bowles
Titan''s Greenhouse Effect and Climate Herein we examine the atmospheric parallels between the Earth and Titan including the possibility of dramatic climate change. In the next decade, we urge extending the duration of the Cassini mission, planning for a future mission focused on Titan’s climate and other measures. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. University of Maryland Download File

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Julian Nott Titan’s unique attraction: it is an ideal destination for humans With so many opportunities in the Solar System it may be hard to choose destinations. Titan has a one quality that sets it apart: it is uniquely suitable for humans. One reason for robotic Mars exploration is that humans will arrive in due course. An identical justification applies to exploring Titan Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Nott Technology LLC Download File

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Candice Hansen

Co-Authors: A.S.Aljabri, D.Banfield, E.B.Bierhaus, M.Brown, J.E.Colwell, M.Dougherty, A.R.Hendrix, H.Hussmann, K.Khurana, D.Landau, A.McEwen, D.A.Paige, C.Paranicas, C.M.Satter, B.Schmidt, M.Showalter, L.J.Spilker, T.Spilker, J.Stansberry, N.Strange, M.Tiscareno, Steve Vance
Triton science with Argo - A Voyage through the Outer Solar System Argo is an innovative pragmatic concept for a New Frontiers 4 mission to significantly expand our knowledge of the outer Solar System. It exploits an upcoming launch window that permits a close Triton encounter during a flyby through the Neptune system, and then continues on to a scientifically-sel Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Kimberly R. Kuhlman

Co-Authors: Alberto Behar, Jack Jones, Penelope Boston, Jeffrey Antol, Gregory Hajos, Warren Kelliher, Max Coleman, Ronald Crawford, Lynn Rothschild, Martin Buehler, Greg Bearman, Daniel W. Wilson, Christopher P. McKay
Tumbleweed: A New Paradigm for Surveying the Surface of Mars Tumbleweeds are lightweight, highly configurable and inexpensive wind-driven vehicles that could enable long-range surveys of the surface of Mars. Their analytical capabilities can be optimized for measurements for astrobiology or in situ resources over relatively large swaths of terrain. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Planetary Science Institute Download File

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Sarah E. Braden

Co-Authors: Samuel J. Lawrence, Mark S. Robinson, Bradley L. Jolliff, Julie D. Stopar, Lillian R. Ostrach, Lisa R. Gaddis, Justin J. Hagerty, Steven B. Simon, B. Ray Hawke
Unexplored Areas of the Moon: Nonmare Domes Analysis of samples returned from unexplored areas of lunar volcanism such as the Gruithuisen Domes will (1) increase our knowledge of the history of the Earth-Moon system, (2) advance theories of lunar magmatic evolution and (3) provide valuable points of comparison with other terrestrial planets. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Arizona State University Download File

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Bruce Jakosky

Co-Authors: Richard W. Zurek, Jan Amend, Michael H. Carr, Daniel J. McCleese, John F. Mustard, Kenneth Nealson, Roger Summons
Update: Are There Signs of Life on Mars? A Scientific Rationale for a Mars Sample-Return Campaign As The Next Step in Solar System Exploration Update: Discussion of the scientific rationale for Mars sample return as the next step in understanding solar-system exploration and Mars astrobiology. Sample return is discussed in the context of a Mars exploration program and the fiscal reality of the Mars program. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. University of Colorado Download File

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Sanjay S. Limaye

Co-Authors: Mark Allen, Sushil Atreya, Kevin H. Baines, Jean-Loup Bertaux, Gordon Bjoraker, Jacques Blamont, Mark Bullock, Eric Chassefiere, Gordon Chin, Curt Covey, David Grinspoon, Samuel Gulkis, Viktor Kerzhanovich, Stephen Lewis, Kevin McGouldrick, W. J. Markiewicz, Rosalyn A. Pertzborn, Christopher Rozoff, Giuseppe Piccioni, Gerald Schubert, Lawrence A. Sromovsky, Colin F. Wilson, Yuk Yung
Venus Atmosphere: Major Questions and Required Observations This paper describes the major questions about the atmosphere of Venus and the observations required to understand it. “How Does Venus atmosphere work?” A dedicated and renewed exploration effort is required to address this fundamental question. Key questions requiring new observations include: H Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Wiscosin - Madison Download File

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Kevin H. Baines

Co-Authors: Sushil Atreya, Tibor Balint, David Crisp, David Grinspoon, Jeffery L. Hall, Gary W. Hunter, Sanjay Limaye, Viktor Kerzhanovich, Paul R. Mahaffy, Christopher T. Russell, David Senske, Stuart K. Stephens, Chris R. Webster
Venus Atmospheric Explorer New Frontiers Mission Concept A multiple-platform mission to Venus that includes a long-duration, circumnavigating balloon-based element, two drop sondes, and an orbiter, is described that directly addresses fundamental science iissues of planetary formation/evolution, dynamics/circulation, chemistry, meteorology, and geology. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Sue Smrekar

Co-Author: Sanjay Limaye
Venus Exploration Goals, Objectives, Investigations, and Priorities This white paper describes the science priorities developed by the Venus Exploration Analysis Group, through a series of meetings with the Venus science community. The science themes for Venus are Origin and Evolution, Venus as a Terrestrial Planet, and Climate Change and the Future of Earth. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Allan H. Treiman Venus Geochemistry: Progress, Prospects, and Future Missions Report and recommendation of the February 2009 workshop of the same name. Inner Planets - Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Lunar and Planetary Institute Download File

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James B. Garvin

Co-Authors: Lori S. Glaze, Sushil Atreya, Bruce Campbell, Don Campbell, Peter Ford, Walter Kiefer, Frank Lemoine, Greg Neumann, Roger Phillips, Keith Raney
Venus: Constraining Crustal Evolution from Orbit Via High-Resolution Geophysical and Geological Reconnaissance Major gaps in understanding Venus include how planetary-scale crustal resurfacing operated, the formation and evolution of highlands, and whether evidence of past environments is preserved. These questions can be addressed through an orbiting radar altimeter and high resolution SAR imager. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Charles Alcock

Co-Authors: Matthew Holman, Matthew Lehner, Stephen Murray, Pavlos Protopapas, Michael Werner
Whipple: Exploring the Solar System beyond Neptune Using a Survey for Occultations of Bright Stars Whipple is a Discovery class mission to explore the outer Solar System. A small telescope will compile lightcurves of ~40,000 stars sampled at 40 Hz. Small bodies from the Kuiper Belt to the Oort Cloud will occult targeted stars, revealing their distances, sizes, and abundances. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Download File

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Dr. John F. Mustard Why Mars Remains a Compelling Target for Planetary Exploration Mars has been an extremely compelling exploration target. The Decadal Survey is re-evaluating the priority of different sectors of the planetary exploration program. Based on the data collected since 2002, our conclusion is that the exploration of Mars is even more compelling now than it was then. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Brown University Download File

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Clive R. Neal

Co-Authors: Bruce Banerdt, Don Bogard, Bill Bottke, Jack Burns, Ben Bussey, Barbara Cohen, Greg Delory, Richard Elphic, Bill Farrell, Lisa Gaddis, Ian Garrick-Bethel, Timothy Grove, James Head III, Jennifer Heldmann, Dana Hurley, Debra Hurwitz, Bradley Jolliff, Catherine Johnson, Christian Koeberl, Georgiana Kramer, David Lawrence, Samuel J. Lawrence, Gary Lofgren, John Longhi, Tomas Magna, David McKay, David Morrison, Sarah Noble, Marc Norman, Laurence Nyquist, Dimitri Papanastassiou, Noah Petro, Carle Pieters, Jeff Plescia, Kevin Righter, Mark Robinson, Greg Schmidt, Harrison Schmitt, Peter Schultz, James Spann, Paul Spudis, Tim Stubbs, Tim Swindle, Lawrence Taylor, G. Jeffrey Taylor, S. Ross Taylor, Mark Wieczorek, Peter Worden, Maria Zuber
Why the Moon is important for Solar System Science This paper outlines the importance of the Moon for Solar System science and in its own right as a critical target for scientific investigation during the next decade of exploration. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Notre Dame Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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