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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Charles A. Hibbitts

Co-Authors: James Bauer, Pietro Bernasconi, John Clarke, Deborah Domingue Josh Emery, Randy Gladstone, Tommy Greathouse, Gary Hansen, Walt Harris, Amanda Hendrix, Noam Izenberg, Carey Lisse, Larry Paxton, Jeff Percival, Kurt Retherford, Andy Rivkin, Mark Swain, Eliot Young
Stratospheric Balloon Missions for Planetary Science A Petition for the Formation of a Working Group to Study the Feasibility of a Facility Platform to Support Planetary Science Missions Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Laboratory Download File

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Thomas D. Jones

Co-Authors: Rob R. Landis, David J. Korsmeyer, Paul A. Abell, Daniel R. Adamo
Strengthening U.S. Exploration Policy via Human Expeditions to Near-Earth Objects By conducting a series of piloted Near-Earth Object (NEO) missions beginning about 2020, the U.S. will reinforce the scientific, economic, programmatic, operations, planetary defense, and public outreach elements of its human exploration program. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Association of Space Explorers Download File

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George Sonneborn

Co-Authors: J. Lunine, R. Doyon, M. McCoughrean, M. Rieke
Study of Planetary Systems and Solar System Objects with JWST Determination of the physical and chemical properties of planetary systems is a key scientific goal of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). This white paper summarizes the mission’s capabilities in our solar system and extrasolar planetary systems. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Carle M. Pieters

Co-Authors: Carlton Allen, Mahesh Anand, W. Bruce Banerdt, William Bottke, Barbara Cohen, Ian A. Crawford, Andrew Daga, Rick Elphic, Bernard Foing, Lisa R. Gaddis, James B. Garvin, Timothy L. Grove, B. Ray Hawke, Jennifer Heldmann, Dana M. Hurley, Brad Jolliff, Christian Koeberl, Clive Neal, Brian J. O’Brien, Anne Peslier, Noah Petro, Jeffery Plescia, Amalie Sinclair, Timothy J. Stubbs, Ross Taylor, Stefanie Tompkins, Allan H. Treiman,Elizabeth Turtle, Mark Wieczorek, Lionel Wilson, Aileen Yingst
Summary and Highlights of the NRC 2007 Report: The Scientific Context for the Exploration of the Moon (SCEM) Understanding processes that have occurred on the Moon provide a framework for understanding the origin and evolution of the other terrestrial planets. The SCEM science goals and priorities remain fundamentally relevant to our understanding of the solar system and central to its exploration. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Brown University Download File

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Jeffrey R. Johnson

Co-Authors: Tori Hoehler, Frances Westall, Scot Rafkin, Paul Withers, Jeffrey Plescia, Victoria Hamilton, Abhi Tripathi, Darlene Lim
Summary of the Mars Science Goals, Objectives, Investigations, and Priorities This document reflects the synthesis of recent MEPAG Goals Committee activities, MEPAG Science Analysis Groups, workshops, feedback, and discussion of these topics at recent MEPAG meetings. It was prepared by the MEPAG Goals and Executive Committees with assistance of many Mars community members. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. United States Geological Survey Download File

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Naoya Imae Supporting the sample return from Mars I heartfully indicate the support on the sample return mission from Mars, and the indispensable facilities in laboratories. Because the sample return mission is the keys of essential problems for Planetary Science. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. National Institute of Polar Research Download File

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Tibor Balint

Co-Authors: James Cutts, Mark Bullock, James Garvin, Stephen Gorevan, Jeffery Hall, Peter Hughes, Gary Hunter, Satish Khanna, Elizabeth Kolawa, Viktor Kerzhanovich, Ethiraj Venkatapathy
Technologies for Future Venus Exploration This VEXAG community white paper covers both heritage, and key enhancing and enabling technologies, which are required for future Venus exploration missions in all three mission classes. It also argues for a targeted technology development program, including a large environmental test chamber. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Patricia M. Beauchamp

Co-Authors: William McKinnon, Thomas Magner, Sami Asmar, Hunter Waite, Stephen Lichten, Ethiraj Venkatapathy, Tibor Balint, Athena Coustenis, Jeffrey L. Hall, Michelle Munk, Alberto Elfes, Kim Reh, John Elliott, Jonathan Rall, Richard Barney, Tom Spilker, Thomas J. Sutliff, Craig Williams, Andy Spry, David Atkinson, Subbarao Surampudi, Nathan Strange, Robert Preston, Wayne Zimmerman, Mark Hofstadter, James Cutts, John Clarke, Kevin Baines, Mohammad Mojarradi, Eric Pencil, Jason Barnes, Conor Nixon, Maria Teresa Capria, Vladimir B. Zivkovic, Anezina Solomonidou, Carrie Anderson, Julie Castillo, Karl Mitchell, Leonid Gurvits, David A. Williams, Javier Martin-Torres, Andrew Coates, Robert West, Rosaly Lopez, Michael Wright, Linda Spilker, Jonathan Lunine, Jason Soderblom, Bill Kurth, Christophe Sotin, Olivier Mousis, Ralf Jaumann, Nicholas Teanby, Edward Sittler, Frank Sohl, George Bampasidis, Valeria Cottini, Eric Wilson, Roger Yelle, Ralph Lorenz, Sushil Atreya, Francois Raulin, Patrick Irwin, Mathieu Hirtzig, Julian Nott, Lucy Norman, Murthy Gudipati, Véronique Vuitton, Rolant Thissen, Henry Throop, Kurt Klaus, Sebastien Rodriguez, Ingo Mueller-Wodarg, James N. Head, Don Banfield, Paul Mahaffy, Robert Brown, Marina Galand, Bonnie J. Buratti , Glen Orton, Jesse Beauchamp, Samuel Gulkis, John Brophy, Timothy A. Livengood, Louise Prockter, Mark A. Gurwell, Lorenzo Bruzzone, Ronald Greeley, Paolo Tortora, Robert Pappalado, Mimi Aung, Jesus Martinez-Frias, Jani Radebaugh, Jean-Pierre Lebreton David Senske, Alfred McEwen, Dirk Schulze-Makuch, Mark Smith, Dennis Matson, Matthew S. Tiscareno, Mathieu Choukroun, Elizabeth Turtle
Technologies for Outer Planet Missions: A Companion to the Outer Planet Assessment Group (OPAG) Strategic Exploration White Paper This is the final version of a white paper which provides the OPAG recommendations for technology required to undertake outer planetary missions. The paper describes the need for an OP technology program and provides specific recommendations for NASA investments during the next decade. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Andreas Rathke Testing for the Pioneer Anomaly on a Pluto Exploration Mission An overview of the phenomenon, commonly dubbed the Pioneer anomaly, is given and the possibility for an experimental test of the anomaly as a secondary goal of an upcoming space mission is discussed using a putative Pluto Orbiter Probe as a paradigm. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. ESA/ESTEC Advanced Concepts Team, Keplerlaan 1 2200 AZ, Nordwijk ZH, The Netherlands Download File

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Mark Hofstadter

Co-Authors: Don Banfield, Linda Brown, Thibault Cavalie, Imke de Pater, Scott Edgington, Leigh Fletcher, A. James Friedson, Daniel Gautier, Sam Gulkis, Mark Gurwell, Patrick Irwin, Erich Karkoschka, Jean-Pierre Lebreton, Julianne Moses, Glenn Orton, Kathy Rages, Peter Read, Adam P. Showman, Nicholas Teanby, P. Yanamandra-Fisher
The Atmospheres of the Ice Giants, Uranus and Neptune We believe many important atmospheric science questions can only be addressed by studies of the ice giants Uranus and Neptune. These questions relate to fundamental atmospheric processes that help us understand the formation, evolution, and current structure of all planets. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Andrew S. Rivkin

Co-Authors: Julie C. Castillo-Rogez, Neyda M. Abreu, Erik Asphaug, Andrew F. Cheng, Beth E. Clark, Barbara A. Cohen, Pamela G. Conrad, Paul Hayne, Ellen S. Howell, Torrence V. Johnson, Georgiana Kramer, Jian-Yang Li, Larry A. Lebofsky, Lucy F. Lim, Amy J. Lovell, Dennis L. Matson, Thomas M. McCord, Lucy-Ann McFadden, William B. McKinnon, Ralph E. Milliken, William Moore, James H. Roberts, Christopher T. Russell, Britney E. Schmidt, Mark V. Sykes, Peter C. Thomas, Mikhail Zolotov
The Case for Ceres: Report to the Planetary Science Decadal Survey Committee We present recent findings about Ceres, stressing its unique nature. Outstanding remaining science questions are discussed along with recommendations for the next steps in Ceres research in the Dawn and post-Dawn era. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Laboratory Download File

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Terry Hurford

Co-Authors: B. Buratti, A. Coustenis, A. Dombard, R. Greenberg, H. Hussmann, M. Kirchoff, C. Porco, A. Rymer, S. Vance, A. Verbiscer
The Case for Enceladus Science In this white paper, we will outline important science questions regarding Enceladus and show the link between these science questions and major themes of exploration as identified by NASA. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Ralph Lorenz

Co-Authors: Terry Hurford, Bruce Bills, Frank Sohl, James Roberts, Christophe Sotin, Hauke Hussmann
The Case for a Titan Geophysical Network Mission Notes the science value of a network of small inexpensive landers focussed on Titan geophysics and that if appropriate radioisotope sources are available, this mission could be affordable under New Frontiers. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Laboratory Download File

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Mark Hofstadter

Co-Authors: David Atkinson, Kevin Baines, Shawn Brooks, Imke de Pater, Leigh Fletcher, A. James Friedson, Mark Gurwell, Matthew Hedman, Brigette Hesman, Patrick Irwin, Sanjay Limaye, Steven Miller, Robert Moeller, Julianne Moses, Neil Murphy, Glenn Orton, Robert Pappalardo, Kathy Rages, Nicole Rappaport, Christophe Sotin, Linda Spilker, Thomas Spilker, Tom Stallard, Matthew Tiscareno, Elizabeth Turtle, Daniel Wenkert
The Case for a Uranus Orbiter This paper discusses some of the fundamental science that must be done at Uranus if we are to understand our Solar System and systems discovered around other stars. We suggest a Uranus Orbiter should be launched in the next decade. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Terry Hurford

Co-Authors: B. Buratti, A. Coustenis, A. Dombard, R. Greenberg, H. Hussmann, M. Kirchoff, C. Porco, A. Rymer
The Case for an Enceladus New Frontiers Mission In this white paper, we will summarize one possible mission concept to explore Enceladus within a New Frontiers-level mission: to stay below the cost cap of $650M (FY09 dollars) and within the launch capability of the Atlas V 551. We imagine that there are other possible mission scenarios... Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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David J. Loftus

Co-Authors: Erin M. Tranfield, Jon C. Rask, Clara McCrosssin
The Chemical Reactivity of Lunar Dust Relevant to Human Exploration As NASA prepares to return to the Moon, a clear understanding of the chemistry of lunar dust is required to set the stage for extended duration lunar surface operations. All aspects of the unique environment of the Moon—micrometeorite bombardment, UV light exposure, solar wind radiation, solar parti Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Scott Sandford

Co-Authors: Michael A’Hearn, Louis J. Allamandola, Daniel Britt, Benton Clark, Jason P. Dworkin, George Flynn, Danny Glavin, Robert Hanel, Martha Hanner, Fred Hörz, Lindsay Keller, Scott Messenger, Nicholas Smith, Frank Stadermann, Darren Wade, Ernst Zinner, Michael E. Zolensky
The Comet Coma Rendezvous Sample Return (CCRSR) Mission Concept – The Next Step Beyond Stardust This paper describes the scientific goals and implementation design of the Comet Coma Rendezvous and Sample Return (CCRSR) mission, one of the concept study missions funded by the recent NASA DSCME Program. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Craig Agnor

Co-Authors: A. Barr, B. Bierhaus, D. Brain, B. Bills, W. Bottke, B. Buratti, S. Charnoz, J. Cho,A. Christou, G. Collins, J. Colwell, N. Cooper, L. Dones, M. Evans, R. French, A. Gulbis,, N. Haghighipour, D. Hamilton, C. Hansen,, A. Hendrix, D. Hurley, K. Jessup, M. Kirchoff, W. Kurth, H. Levison, M. Lewis, R. Lillis, Y. Ma, R. Malhotra, T. Michaels, M. Mickelson, W. Patterson, L. Prockter, D. Ragozzine, K. Rutherford, K. Sayanagi, P. Schenk, M. Summers, M. Tiscareno, K. Tsiganis, P. Zarka
The Exploration of Neptune and Triton Neptune and its captured moon Triton are unexplored with modern spacecraft instrumentation. Observations of these objects are urgently needed to address planet formation and the evolution of ice giant planets, icy satellites, Kuiper Belt Objects, and the solar system itself. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Queen Mary, University of London (United Kingdom) Download File

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Jeffrey R. Johnson

Co-Authors: B. Archinal, R. Kirk, L. Gaddis, J. Anderson, B. Bussey, R. Beyer, L. Bleamaster, W. Patterson, J. Gillis-Davis, T. Watters, P. Schenk, B. Denevi
The Importance of a Planetary Cartography Program: Status and Recommendations for NASA 2013-2023 We describe 7 areas where greater attention should be paid to data returned from planetary missions, beyond minimum “mission success”. The alternative is duplication of efforts and greater chances for errors, thereby diminishing the cost return and scientific potential provided by planetary data. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. United States Geological Survey Download File

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W. M. Farrell

Co-Author: Mihaly Horanyi
The Lunar Dusty Exosphere: The Extreme Case of an Inner Planetary Atmosphere The Moon is an extreme type of atmosphere – a surface bounded exosphere – and may represent the final ‘ground state’ of any geologically dormant body. Neutral gas and dust are emitted from its surface via universal processes believed to be occurring at all near-airless bodies. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / University of Colorado Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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Last Updated: 9 Apr 2012