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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Lars Borg

Co-Authors: Carl Allen, Dave Beaty, Karen Buxbaum, Joy Crisp, Dave Des Marais, Danny Glavin, Monica Grady, Ken Herkenhoff, Richard Mattingly, Scott McLennan, Denis Moura, John Mustard, Lisa Pratt, Steve Symes, Meenakshi Wadhwa
A Consensus Vision for Mars Sample Return A consensus vision of a Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission concept is presented, reflecting the integration of multiple recent community-based planning discussions. It summarizes the current state of thought regarding the science goals that would be best addressed by samples returned from Mars. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Lawrence Livermore National Lab Download File

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William B.C. Crandall A Decadal Shift: From Space Exploration Science to Space Utilization Science We urge the Decadal Survey Committee, which is charged with developing “a comprehensive science and mission strategy for planetary science,” to temporarily shift research priorities in the United States from space exploration science to space utilization science. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Space Wealth Download File

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E. Robert Kursinski

Co-Authors: James Lyons, Claire Newman, Mark Richardson
A Dual Satellite Mission Concept for Martian Climate and Chemistry mm-wavelength satellite to satellite occultations combined with solar occultation and thermal IR emission aerosol measurements will tightly and uniquely constrain processes to answer key open questions about the chemistry and climate of Mars. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. University of Arizona Download File

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J. Edmund Riedel

Co-Authors: MiMi Aung, Paul G. Backes, David S. Bayard, David S. Berry, John R. Brophy, L. Alberto Cangahuala, Steve A. Chien, Christopher A. Grasso, Jeffery W. Levison, Tomas Martin-Mur, William M. Owen, Jr., Stephen P. Synnott
A Survey of the Technologies Necessary for the Next Decade of Small Body and Planetary Exploration Deep space reconnaissance and sample return missions will require a range of technology developments for maximum science return. These technologies include propulsion; telecommunication; remote sensing; guidance, navigation and control; sampling; onboard processors; and autonomy. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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David E. Smith A budget phasing approach to Europa Jupiter System Mission Science Due to budget constraints, the proposed Europa Jupiter System Mission is unlikely to occur as planned. We propose to split EJSM into three small, more affordable and less risky missions that return science earlier (about the same time as the launch date of ELSM) and in easier to accomodate budgets. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. NASA Goddard Space Flight Cener Download File

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Robert M. Kelso A commercially-leveraged, science-focused, lunar exploration program Summarizes the NASA work in assessing use of commercially-demonstrated landers and comm systems to enable early access to the lunar surface for science and exploration. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Headquarters Download File

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Michael H. Wong

Co-Authors: Máté Ádámkovics, Sushil K. Atreya, Don Banfield, Jim Bell, Susan Benecchi, Gordon Bjoraker, John R. Casani, John T. Clarke, Imke de Pater, Scott G. Edgington, Leigh N. Fletcher, Richard G. French, William Grundy, Amanda R. Hendrix, Erich Karkoschka, Jian-Yang Li, Franck Marchis, Melissa A. McGrath, William J. Merline, Julianne I. Moses, Keith Noll, Glenn S. Orton, Kathy A. Rages, Kurt Retherford, Kunio Sayanagi, Nick Schneider, Eric H. Smith, Lawrence A. Sromovsky, Nathan J. Strange, Anne Verbiscer, Padmavati A. Yanamandra-Fisher
A dedicated space observatory for time-domain solar system science The specific requirements for time-domain solar system science are adequate sampling rates and campaign durations. The observatory must be spaceborne both to satisfy the time-domain requirements as well as to maintain access to the dynamically significant ultraviolet spectral range. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. University of California Berkeley / STScI Download File

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James D. Walker

Co-Authors: Walter F. Huebner, Sidney Chocron, Walt Gray, Daniel Boice
Active Seismology of Asteroids through Impact and/or Blast Loading We have no direct data on the interior structure of primitive bodies. The interior structure of asteroids is relevant to most solar system formation and evolution theories. Seismology is the only method for determining the interior structure for a range of sizes of asteroids to address. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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Julian Nott

Co-Authors: Kim Reh, Jonathan Lunine, David L. Pierce, Patricia Beauchamp, Tim Colonius, R.C. Downs, Jerrold Marsden, Carl F. Braun, Don Day, Michael Arnold, Wade Allmon, Dick Bohannnon, Alberto Elfes, John Elliot, Debora Fairbrother, Jack Jones, Jeff Hall, Greg Mungas, Michael Pauken, Rob Sinclair, Luke Brooke, David Wakefield
Advanced Titan Balloon Design Concepts Numerous studies agree that Titan is of outstanding scientific interest and Montgolfiere balloons ideal for its exploration. This paper examines balloon operations, weather and steering. It suggests novel concepts that may encourage radical thinking about Titan balloon designs. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Nott Technology LLC Download File

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Carl Pilcher

Co-Authors: Kevin P. Hand, Patricia M. Beauchamp, David Des Marais, David Grinspoon, Karen J. Meech, Sean N. Raymond
An Astrobiological Lens on Planetary System Science Astrobiology provides a lens through which all of planetary science and solar system exploration, as well as life on Earth, can be viewed. Astrobiology, like planetary science, is a systems-level science. In planetary science, one must understand connections be [CHARACTERS NOT ACCEPTED BEYOND THIS Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Astrobiology Institute, NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Mark Allen

Co-Authors: Carrie Anderson, Andrew Coates, A. James Friedson, Murthy Gudipati, Kostas Kalogerakis, Ralph Lorenz, Jonathan Lunine, Catherine Neish, Conor Nixon, Lucy Norman
Astrobiological Research Priorities for Titan Titan, the haze-enshrouded moon of Saturn, has the largest accessible inventory of organic molecules in the Solar System outside of the Earth. The prospects are high for the formation of prebiotic compounds not unlike what might have preceded the origin of life in the early history of the Earth. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Carl Pilcher

Co-Authors: Kevin P. Hand, Patricia M. Beauchamp, David Des Marais, David Grinspoon, Karen J. Meech, Sean N. Raymond
Astrobiology Priorities for Planetary Science Flight Missions We have posited in another white paper that all of Planetary System Science can be seen through an astrobiological lens. In this paper we present priorities for flight mission investigations derived by applying that lens to the Planetary Science flight mission program. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Astrobiology Institute, NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Alan P. Boss

Co-Authors: Edward Young, Victoria Meadows, Nader Haghighipour
Astrobiology Research Priorities for Exoplanets We recommend that the Decadal Survey place a high priority on continued, even expanded, support of the Research & Analysis programs that fund the efforts of exoplanet theorists, laboratory workers, and observers through NASA’s and NSF''s research programs. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington Download File

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Ariel D. Anbar

Co-Authors: David Grinspoon, Sean C. Solomon, G. Jeffrey Taylor
Astrobiology Research Priorities for Mercury, Venus, and the Moon This paper describes the value of exploration of Mercury, Venus and the Moon for the field of astrobiology and specifies high priority goals. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Arizona State University Download File

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Dante S. Lauretta

Co-Authors: Paul Abell, Carlton Allen, Ariel Anbar, Olivier Barnouin-Jha, M. Antonella Barucci, E. Beau Bierhaus, Richard P. Binzel, William F. Bottke, Steven R. Chesley, Beth E. Clark, Edward Cloutis, Harold C. Connolly, Jr., Michael J. Drake, Jason P. Dworkin, M. Darby Dyar, Jack Farmer, Rebecca Ghent, Daniel P. Glavin, Nader Haghighipour, Vicky E. Hamilton, Carl W. Hergenrother, Kip Hodges, Lindsay P. Keller, Detlef Koschny, John Marshall, Scott Messenger, Steven Mielke, Keiko Nakamura-Messenger, Joseph A. Nuth, Dennis Reuter, Frans J. M. Rietmeijer, Kevin Righter, Waddell Robey, Michal Rozyczka, Nicolaus Copernicus, Farid Salama, Scott A. Sandford, Daniel J. Scheeres, Everett Shock, Steve Vance, Brian D. Wade, Kosei E. Yamaguchi
Astrobiology Research Priorities for Primitive Asteroids Study of primitive asteroids is fundamental to understanding the origin, distribution, and evolution of volatile and organic compounds in the early Solar System. This paper outlines six major research focus areas and recommends three mission concepts, which are listed in priority order. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. University of Arizona Download File

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Dirk Schulze-Makuch

Co-Authors: Francois Raulin, Cynthia Phillips, Kevin Hand, Susanne Neuer, Brad Dalton
Astrobiology Research Priorities for the Outer Solar System The outer solar system provides a rewarding assortment of planetary diversity of high interest to astrobiology. This White Paper for the 2009-2011 Planetary Science Decadal Survey evaluates the planetary bodies in the outer solar system and their value to the search for life and astrobiology. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Washington State University Download File

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Jack D. Farmer

Co-Authors: Mark Allen, Tori Hoehler, Michael Mischna
Astrobiology Research and Technology Priorities for Mars This white paper provides a broad overview of the major science and technology drivers for the next decade of Mars exploration. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Arizona State University Download File

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Andrew Steele

Co-Authors: Amundsen H.E.F., Benning L., Blake D., Borg L., Bower D.M., Brantley S., Brinkerhoff W., Cleaves J., Coates A., Cody G., Conrad P.G., Dieing T., Fogel M., Foing B., Fries M., Fritz J., Fsicher H., Glamoclija M., Garrett M., Glotch T., Hauber E., Hoffman H., Huntsberger T., Jaumann R., Johnson C., Karunatillake S., Kish A., Kress M., Hoehler T., McCollom T., McCubbin F.M., Ming D., Monaco L., Morrill P., Ohmoto H., Paar G., Pacros A., Pullan D., Robb F., Rull F., Sarrazin P., Schmitz N., Schoonen M.A.A., Schrenk M., Shahar A., Sherwood-Lollar B., Shirey S., Siljstrom S., Sims M., Smirnov A., Starke V., Toporski J.K.W., Vago, J., Wainwright N., Weishaupt K., Westall, F., Yonse, P., Zare R.N.
Astrobiology Sample Acquisition and Return This paper outlines an Astrobiology Sample Acquisition and Return mission based on the MEPAG Mid Range Rover concept mission for Mars exploration. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Carnegie Institution of Washington Download File

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Olga Prieto Ballesteros

Co-Authors: Kevin P. Hand, Ariel Anbar, Felipe Gómez-Gómez, Oleg Korablev, Ralph Lorenz, Ralph Milliken, Daniel Prieur, Francois Raulin, Steve Vance, Michel Viso
Astrobiology in Europa and Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) This paper describe the Astrobiology science in EJSM and the opportunities of having in situ elements in future missions. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Centro de Astrobiología-INTA-CSIC Download File

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Nathan J. Strange

Co-Authors: Daniel Scheeres, Ryan Russell, Kathleen Howell, James Longuski, Victoria Coverstone, David B. Spencer, Cesar Ocampo, Belinda Marchand, Terry Alfriend, John Junkins, Daniele Mortari, John Crassidis, Landis Markley, David Folta, John Dankanich, Shyam Bhaskaran, Dennis Byrnes, Kim Reh, Martin Lo, Jon Sims, John C. Smith, Brent Buffington, Anastassios Petropoulos, Damon Landau, Fernando Abilleira, Ryan Park, Jeffrey Parker, Julie Bellerose, Stefano Campagnola, Andrew Klesh, Nitin Arora, Diane Craig Davis, Kevin Kloster, Alfred Lynam, Geoff Wawrzyniak
Astrodynamics Research and Analysis Funding Funding for astrodynamics research has been largely limited to the development and operations phases of missions. Early funding for astrodynamics research would produce new techniques prior to formulation of missions, which could lead to novel and exciting concepts. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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