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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Clive R. Neal

Co-Authors: Bruce Banerdt, Don Bogard, Bill Bottke, Jack Burns, Ben Bussey, Barbara Cohen, Greg Delory, Richard Elphic, Bill Farrell, Lisa Gaddis, Ian Garrick-Bethel, Timothy Grove, James Head III, Jennifer Heldmann, Dana Hurley, Debra Hurwitz, Bradley Jolliff, Catherine Johnson, Christian Koeberl, Georgiana Kramer, David Lawrence, Samuel J. Lawrence, Gary Lofgren, John Longhi, Tomas Magna, David McKay, David Morrison, Sarah Noble, Marc Norman, Laurence Nyquist, Dimitri Papanastassiou, Noah Petro, Carle Pieters, Jeff Plescia, Kevin Righter, Mark Robinson, Greg Schmidt, Harrison Schmitt, Peter Schultz, James Spann, Paul Spudis, Tim Stubbs, Tim Swindle, Lawrence Taylor, G. Jeffrey Taylor, S. Ross Taylor, Mark Wieczorek, Peter Worden, Maria Zuber
Why the Moon is important for Solar System Science This paper outlines the importance of the Moon for Solar System science and in its own right as a critical target for scientific investigation during the next decade of exploration. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Notre Dame Download File

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Clive R. Neal

Co-Authors: Brad Bailey, Dave Beaty, Mary Sue Bell, Mike Duke, Paul Eckert, John Gruener, Jeff Jones, Robert Kelso, David Kring, Dan Lester, Paul Neitzel, Lewis Peach, Neal Pellis, Mike Ramsey, Debra Reiss-Bubenheim, James Rice, Gerald Sanders, Kurt Sacksteder, Greg Schmidt, Charles Shearer, Kelly Snook, Jim Spann, Paul Spudis, George Tahu, G. Jeffrey Taylor, Lawrence Taylor, Jeff Volosin, Michael Wargo
The Lunar Exploration Roadmap. Exploring the Moon in the 21st Century: Themes, Goals, Objectives, Investigations, and Priorities, 2009 This paper summarizes the long term Lunar Exploration Roadmap that has been developed by the lunar community and coordinated by the Lunar Exploration Analysis Group. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Notre Dame Download File

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Jasper Halekas

Co-Authors: M. Fuller, I. Garrick-Bethell, L. L. Hood, C. L. Johnson, K. Lawrence, R. J. Lillis, R. P. Lin, M. Manga, M. E. Purucker, B. P. Weiss
Determining the origins of lunar remanent crustal magnetism The discovery of lunar magnetic fields of crustal origin was a major scientific surprise of the Apollo program. Solving the enigma of lunar remanent crustal magnetization will provide fundamental insights into the thermal history of the lunar core/dynamo, mantle, and crust, and into the processes by which crustal magnetization is acquired on airless bodies - for instance, large basin-forming impacts. Determining the origin and history of lunar crustal magnetism will require the return of oriented samples... Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of California Berkeley Download File

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Jack Burns

Co-Authors: E. Hallman, D. Duncan, J. Darling, & J. Stocke, J. Lazio, K. Weiler, J. Hewitt, C. Carilli, R. Bradley, T. Bastian, J. Ulvestad, J. Kasper & L. Greenhill, R. MacDowall, S. Merkowitz, J. McGarry, Zagwodzki, P. Yeh, H. Thronson, S. Ne, D. Currie, T. Murphy, S. Furlanetto & A. Mesinger, A. Loeb, J. Pritchard & E. Visbal, D. Jones, G. Taylor, K. Nordtvedt, J. Bowman, J. Grunsfeld, S. Bale, B. Wandelt, H. Falcke
Science from the Moon: The NASA/NLSI Lunar University Network for Astrophysics Research (LUNAR) The Moon is a unique platform for fundamental astrophysical measurements of gravitation, the Sun, and the Universe. With the aim of providing additional perspective on the Moon as a scientific platform, this white paper describes key research projects involving astrophysics from the Moon. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Colorado Download File

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Yasunori Miura New lunar science and engineering with carbon cycle. New idea and technique with carbon cycle can be applied at lunar crust origin, lunar interior and lunar double construction (surfae and underground) building at the lunar base in future from new carbon-fixing cycle. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Earth & Planet. Material Sci., Yamaguchi University Download File

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Brad Jolliff

Co-Authors: Noah Petro, Leon Alkalai, Carlton Allen, Irene Antonenko, Lars Borg, William Bottke, Barbara Cohen, Michael Duke, Amy Fagan, Bernard Foing, Lisa Gaddis, John Gruener, Justin Hagerty, James Head III, Harold Hiesinger, Peter Isaacson, Randy Korotev, Georgiana Kramer, Samuel Lawrence, Gary Lofgren, Tomas Magna, Clive Neal, Marc Norman, Larry Nyquist, Gordon Osinski, Dimitri Papanastassiou, Carle Pieters, Bhairavi Shankar, Tim Swindle, G. Jeffrey Taylor, Allan Treiman, Paul Warren, Mark Wieczorek, Ryan Zeigler, Nicolle Zellner
Constraining Solar System impact history and evolution of the terrestrial planets with exploration of and samples from the Moon’s South Pole-Aitken Basin A fundamental issue of Solar System science is determining the early history of the terrestrial planets, including giant impact bombardment and the evolution of differentiated crust. Exploration and sampling of the Moon’s South Pole–Aitken Basin can illuminate these formative planetary processes. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Washington University, Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Brian J. O''Brien

Co-Author: James R.Gaier
Indicative Basic Issues about Lunar Dust in the Lunar Environment Basic issues of lunar dust - including recent discoveries -so fundamental they affect a wide range of lunar research and exploration must be recognised as priorities. Four Recommendations and Outcomes are given. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Western Australia Download File

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Sanjay S. Limaye

Co-Authors: Mark Allen, Sushil Atreya, Kevin H. Baines, Jean-Loup Bertaux, Gordon Bjoraker, Jacques Blamont, Mark Bullock, Eric Chassefiere, Gordon Chin, Curt Covey, David Grinspoon, Samuel Gulkis, Viktor Kerzhanovich, Stephen Lewis, Kevin McGouldrick, W. J. Markiewicz, Rosalyn A. Pertzborn, Christopher Rozoff, Giuseppe Piccioni, Gerald Schubert, Lawrence A. Sromovsky, Colin F. Wilson, Yuk Yung
Venus Atmosphere: Major Questions and Required Observations This paper describes the major questions about the atmosphere of Venus and the observations required to understand it. “How Does Venus atmosphere work?” A dedicated and renewed exploration effort is required to address this fundamental question. Key questions requiring new observations include: H Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Wiscosin - Madison Download File

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Harrison H. Schmitt Lunar Pyroclastic Deposits and the Origin of the Moon he primary difficulty in accepting the computer modeled "giant impact" hypothesis for the origin of the Moon, versus independent derivation, comes from the analysis of the non-glass components of lunar pyroclastic deposits. These prove that volatile reservoirs exist in the mantle of the Moon. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Wisconsin-Madison Download File

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Harrison H. Schmitt

Co-Authors: Bernard H. Foing, Mark Helper, Friedrich P. Horz, Jeff Plescia, Authur Snoke, Kris Zacny
Lunar Field Geological Exploration Geological exploration by experience and highly trained field geologists provides the foundation for interpretation of lunar samples in the context of the origin and evolution of the terrestrial planets. Future lunar exploration should fully utilize the best available field geologists. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Wisconsin-Madison Download File

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Harrison H. Schmitt Observations Necessary for Useful Global Climate Models Critical differences exist between scientists who observe weather and climate and those who attempt to model nature’s complexities. The modelers believe complex mathematics and broad assumptions can forecast the future of climate, Earth’s most complex system. Long-term observation is essential. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Wisconsin-Madison Download File

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Harrison H. Schmitt

Co-Authors: Andy Daga,Jeff Plescia
Geopolitical Context of Lunar Exploration and Settlement The Moon has attracted international attention as the current focus of peaceful competition in space. This competition has long term implications for the future of liberty on Earth. If non-democratic regimes dominate exploration and settlement of the Moon, liberty will be at risk. Only the United St Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Wisconsin-Madison Download File

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Harrison H. Schmitt

Co-Authors: Mark W. Henley, Kim Kuhlman, Gerald. L. Kulcinski, John F. Santarius, Lawrence A. Taylor
Lunar Helium-3 Fusion Resource Distribution The Moon''s regolith contains vast resources of helium-3, an ideal fuel for terrestrial fusion power systems. Development of plans for private sector investment in obtaining helium-3 and its by-products requires detailed definition of that isotope''s selenographic distribution. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Wisconsin-Madison Download File

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Allan H. Treiman Venus Geochemistry: Progress, Prospects, and Future Missions Report and recommendation of the February 2009 workshop of the same name. Inner Planets - Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Lunar and Planetary Institute Download File

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George Sonneborn

Co-Authors: J. Lunine, R. Doyon, M. McCoughrean, M. Rieke
Study of Planetary Systems and Solar System Objects with JWST Determination of the physical and chemical properties of planetary systems is a key scientific goal of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). This white paper summarizes the mission’s capabilities in our solar system and extrasolar planetary systems. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Craig Agnor

Co-Authors: A. Barr, B. Bierhaus, D. Brain, B. Bills, W. Bottke, B. Buratti, S. Charnoz, J. Cho,A. Christou, G. Collins, J. Colwell, N. Cooper, L. Dones, M. Evans, R. French, A. Gulbis,, N. Haghighipour, D. Hamilton, C. Hansen,, A. Hendrix, D. Hurley, K. Jessup, M. Kirchoff, W. Kurth, H. Levison, M. Lewis, R. Lillis, Y. Ma, R. Malhotra, T. Michaels, M. Mickelson, W. Patterson, L. Prockter, D. Ragozzine, K. Rutherford, K. Sayanagi, P. Schenk, M. Summers, M. Tiscareno, K. Tsiganis, P. Zarka
The Exploration of Neptune and Triton Neptune and its captured moon Triton are unexplored with modern spacecraft instrumentation. Observations of these objects are urgently needed to address planet formation and the evolution of ice giant planets, icy satellites, Kuiper Belt Objects, and the solar system itself. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Queen Mary, University of London (United Kingdom) Download File

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Karla B. Clark Europa Jupiter System Mission The baseline EJSM architecture consists the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). Complementary instruments monitor dynamic phenomena, map the Jovian magnetosphere and its interactions with the Galilean satellites, and characterize water oceans beneat Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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David A. Williams

Co-Authors: Jani Radebaugh, Rosaly M.C. Lopes, Imke de Pater, Nicholas M. Schneider, Frank Marchis, Julianne Moses, Ashley G. Davies, Jason Perry, Jeffrey S. Kargel, Laszlo P. Keszthelyi, Chris Paranicas, Alfred S. McEwen, Kandis Lea Jessup, David Goldstein, Melissa Bunte, Julie Rathbun, Melissa McGrath, Krishan Khurana, Sébastien Rodriguez, Terry A. Hurford, Amanda R. Hendrix, Michelle Kirchoff
Future Io Exploration for 2013-2022 and Beyond, Part 2: Recommendations for Missions This revised white paper lists our recommendations for mission concepts and instruments to accomplish the science objectives for future exploration of Jupiter''s moon Io for the decade of 2013-2022 and beyond. (Final version with additional coauthors). Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Arizona State University Download File

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David A. Williams

Co-Authors: Jani Radebaugh, Rosaly M.C. Lopes, Imke de Pater, Nicholas M. Schneider, Frank Marchis, Julianne Moses, Ashley G. Davies, Jason Perry, Jeffrey S. Kargel, Laszlo P. Keszthelyi, Chris Paranicas, Alfred S. McEwen, Kandis Lea Jessup, David Goldstein, Melissa Bunte, Julie Rathbun, Melissa McGrath, Krishan Khurana, Sébastien Rodriguez, Terry A. Hurford, Amanda R. Hendrix, Michelle Kirchoff, Elizabeth Turtle
Future Io Exploration for 2013-2022 and Beyond, Part 1: Justification and Science Objectives This white paper (revised draft) summarizes the current scientific questions regarding Jupiter''s volcanic moon Io, and the scientific objectives and measurements that need to be accomplished by future exploration. (Final version with additional coauthors). Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Arizona State University Download File

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William B. McKinnon

Co-Authors: S.K. Atreya, K.H. Baines, P.M. Beauchamp,J. Clarke, G.C. Collins, J.E. Connerney, C.J. Hansen, M.D. Hofstadter, T.V. Johnson, R.D. Lorenz, R.T. Pappalardo, C.B. Phillips, J. Radebaugh, P.M. Schenk, L.J. Spilker, T. Spilker, H. Throop, E.P. Turtle, D.A. Williams, T. Balint, A. Coustenis, T. Hurford, J.-P. Lebreton, D.L. Matson, M. McGrath
Exploration Strategy for the Outer Planets 2013-2022: Goals and Priorities Outer Planets Assessment Group (OPAG) recommends that the DS support 1) the JEO and ESJM flagship, 2) Cassini Solstice Mission, and 3) Technology to permit next Outer Planets flagship to Titan/Enceladus, and assess the feasibility of 4) "small flagship" mission class and 5) a set of NF candidates. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Washington University Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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