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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Murthy Gudipati

Co-Authors: Michael A''Hearn, Nancy Brickhouse, John Cowan, Paul Drake, Steven Federman, Gary Ferland, Adam Frank, Wick Haxton, Eric Herbst, Michael Mumma, Farid Salama, Daniel Wolf Savin, Lucy Ziurys
Laboratory Studies for Planetary Sciences The WGLA of the AAS promotes collaboration and exchange of knowledge between astronomy and planetary sciences and the laboratory sciences (physics, chemistry, and biology). Laboratory data needs of ongoing and next generation planetary science missions are carefully evaluated and recommended. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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John D. Rummel Planetary Protection for Planetary Science and Exploration A precis of planetary protection policy concerns, their history, and the role of the SSB and NASA internal advisory activities in ensuring progress and appropriate implementation of the policy. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. East Carolina University Download File

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David Grinspoon

Co-Authors: Mark Bullock, James Kasting, Janet Luhmann, Peter Read, Scot Rafkin, Sanjay Limaye, Kevin McGouldrick, Gordon Chin, Samuel Gulkis, Feng Tian, Eric Chassefiere, Hakan Svedhem, Vikki Meadows
Comparative Planetary Climate Studies It is the purpose of this White Paper to draw attention to, and summarize, the important role that planetary exploration, and research with a comparative planetology focus, have played and should continue to play in our understanding of climate, and climate change, on Earth. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Denver Museum of Nature & Science Download File

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Andrew Daga

Co-Authors: Carlton Allen, James Burke, Ian Crawford, Richard Leveille, Steven Simon, Lin Tze Tan
Lunar and Martian Lava Tube Exploration as Part of an Overall Scientific Survey This paper discusses the opportunity to search for and exploit lava tubes on the surfaces of the Moon and Mars as a means of enabling ambitious planetary science missions. [FINAL VERSION] Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Andrew Daga & Associates LLC Download File

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Friedemann T. Freund Previously Overlooked/Ignored Electronic Charge Carriers in Rocks I would like to draw the attention of members of the Decadal Survey Committee to a rather fundamental discovery, which (I believe) will have a major impact on the Earth and Planetary Sciences in the coming years. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. NASA Ames Research Center/ SETI Institute Download File

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Dana Backman SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) and Planetary Science This paper consists of the intro & observatory capabilities (ch. 1) plus the planetary science (ch. 5) portions of the SOFIA Science Vision doc pub. in 2009 as an update of the scientific case for SOFIA. D. Backman produced this extract; the original doc is authored by the SOFIA Science Team. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. SOFIA / SETI Institute Download File

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Eberhard Gruen

Co-Authors: Frank Postberg, Harald Krüger, Mihaly Horanyi, Elmar Jessberger Sascha Kempf, Ralf Srama, Thomas Stephan, Zoltan Sternovsky
In-Situ Mass Spectrometry of Atmosphereless Planetary Objects Dust particles emitted from atmosphereless planetary objects are samples of their surfaces. By mass analyzing these particles and tracing back their trajectories to their sources the surface composition of Mercury, planetary satellites, dusty rings sources, asteroids and comets can be obtained. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. LASP, University of Colorado Download File

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John F. Cooper

Co-Authors: Steven J. Sturner, Chris Paranicas, Matthew E. Hill, Abigail M. Rymer, Paul D. Cooper, Dan Pascu, Robert E. Johnson, Timothy A. Cassidy, Thomas M. Orlando, Kurt D. Retherford, Nathan A. Schwadron, Ralf I. Kaiser, François Leblanc, Louis J. Lanzerotti, Claudia J. Alexander, Henry B. Garrett, Amanda R. Hendrix, Wing H. Ip
Space Weathering Impact on Solar System Surfaces and Mission Science Space weathering is the collection of physical processes acting to erode and chemically modify planetary surfaces directly exposed to space environments of planetary magnetospheres, the heliosphere, and the local interstellar environment of the solar system. Space weathering affects the physical and Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Anthony Wesley

Co-Authors: Glenn Orton, Padma Yanamandra-Fisher, Leigh Fletcher, Kevin Baines, Christopher Go, Makenzie Lystrup, Olivier Mousis, Imke de Pater, Jean-Pierre Lebreton, Kunio Sayanagi, Timothy Livengood, Tom Stallard, Henrik Mellin, Nigel Bannister
Ground-Based Support for Solar-System Exploration: Continuous Coverage Visible Light Imaging of Solar System Objects from a Network of Ground-Based Observatories We propose that the needs of planetary science for event-detection and time-critical observations could be well-served by a global network of low-cost remote-controlled (or autonomous) telescopes optimized for high-resolution visible light imaging of solar system targets. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Acquerra Pty Ltd. Download File

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Ethiraj Venkatapathy

Co-Authors: Helen H. Hwang, Bernard Laub, Joseph L. Conley, James Arnold, Christine E. Szalai, Jim Tibaudo, Robert Knudsen, Andrew Chambers, David Atkinson, Sushil K. Atreva, Joseph M. Vellinga, William H. Willcockson, Janine M. Thornton, Nicholas G. Smith, Richard A. Hund, John Dec,Max L. Blosser, Michelle M. Munk, Robert Maddock, Prasun N. Desai, Walter Engelund, Stephen Sandford, David A. Gilman, Steven W. Gayle, John Kowal, Christopher B. Madden, Stan Bouslog, Brian J. Remark, Donald Curry, Scott Coughlin, Adam J. Amar, Kevin H. Baines, Tibor Balint, Bernard Bienstock, George T. Chen, James A. Cutts, Jeffery L. Hall, Samad A. Hayati, Pamela J. Hoffman, Linda Spilker, Romasso P. Rivellini, Robert Manning, Eric M. Slimko, Adam D. Steltzner, Thomas Spilker, Jeffrey Umland, Charles Kiskiras, Duane Baker, Thomas Foster, Dominic Calamito, James B. Garvin, Timothy A. Sauerwein, Sharon Seipel, Lori S. Glaze, Spencer Stolis, Mark Lippold, Francis Schwind, James Thompson, Raj Narayan, Thomas Andrews, Conley Thatcher, Edwin B. Curry, John McKinney, Robert Frampton, Todd Stever, Charley Bown, William Congdon, Jennifer Congdon, Daniel M. Empey, Joe Hartman, Dinesh Prabhu, Nancy L. Mangini, Kristina A. Skokova, Margaret M. Stackpoole, Tood White, Howard Goldstein, Melmoth Covington, Robin A. Beck, Carol W. Carroll, Charles A. Smith, Deepak Bose, Anthony Colaprete, David M. Driver, Edward Martinez, Donald T. Ellerby, Matthew J. Gasch, Aga M. Goodsell, James Reuther, Sylvia M. Johnson, Dean Kontinos, Mary Livingston, Michael J. Wright, Harry Partridge, George A. Raiche, Huy K. Tran, Kerry A. Trumble
Thermal Protection System Technologies for Enabling Future Venus Exploration This paper discusses the capability of currently available TPS and the availability of heritage carbon phenolic used on the Pioneer-Venus probes. A prime conclusion is that there are important issues regarding the availability of the TPS required for future Venus entry probes. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Tore Straume Solar Radiation Output: Reading the Record of Lunar Rocks Reconstructing solar energetic particle output by measuring signatures in lunar surface samples Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Michael R. Collier

Co-Authors: Thomas E. Cravens, Mats Holmstrom, James Burch, Konrad Dennerl, Herbert Gunell, David G. Sibeck, Steven Snowden, F. Scott Porter, Ina P. Robertson, Nick Omidi, Kip Kuntz, Steven Sembay, Jennifer Carter, Andrew Read, Dimitra Koutroumpa, Massimiliano Galeazzi, Susan Lepri, K.C. Hansen, Dan McCammon, Ruth Skoug, H. Kent Hills, Timothy J. Stubbs, Pavel M. Travnicek, George Fraser, Mark Lester
Global Imaging of Solar Wind-Planetary Body Interactions using Soft X-ray Cameras We show in this white paper that, with suitable instrumentation on planetary and terrestrial spacecraft, soft X-ray emission associated with the solar wind interaction with planetary neutral atoms can map out the solar wind distribution around planets, including the locations of plasma boundaries. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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James B. Garvin

Co-Authors: Lori S. Glaze, Sushil Atreya, Bruce Campbell, Don Campbell, Peter Ford, Walter Kiefer, Frank Lemoine, Greg Neumann, Roger Phillips, Keith Raney
Venus: Constraining Crustal Evolution from Orbit Via High-Resolution Geophysical and Geological Reconnaissance Major gaps in understanding Venus include how planetary-scale crustal resurfacing operated, the formation and evolution of highlands, and whether evidence of past environments is preserved. These questions can be addressed through an orbiting radar altimeter and high resolution SAR imager. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Stephen M. Merkowitz

Co-Authors: Edward Aaron, Neil Ashby, David Carrier, Douglas Currie, John J. Degnan, Simone Dell’Agnello, Giovanni Delle Monache, Jan McGarry, Thomas W. Murphy, Jr., Kenneth Nordtvedt, Robert D. Reasenberg, Slava G. Turyshev, James G. Williams, Thomas Zagwodzki
The Moon as a Test Body for General Relativity This whitepaper describes how the next generation of lunar laser ranging addresses four key gravitational science questions. In addition, we discuss the current state of retroreflector technology and describe ways in which further advances can be made in laser ranging technologies. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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W. M. Farrell

Co-Author: Mihaly Horanyi
The Lunar Dusty Exosphere: The Extreme Case of an Inner Planetary Atmosphere The Moon is an extreme type of atmosphere – a surface bounded exosphere – and may represent the final ‘ground state’ of any geologically dormant body. Neutral gas and dust are emitted from its surface via universal processes believed to be occurring at all near-airless bodies. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / University of Colorado Download File

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Robert M. Kelso A commercially-leveraged, science-focused, lunar exploration program Summarizes the NASA work in assessing use of commercially-demonstrated landers and comm systems to enable early access to the lunar surface for science and exploration. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Headquarters Download File

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Mian. M. Abbas

Co-Authors: A.C. LeClair, D. Tankosic, D.L. Gallagher, R.B. Sheldon, E.A. West, J.C. Brasunas, D.E. Jennings
Global Distributions of Gas & Dust in the Lunar Atmosphere from Solar Infrared Absorption Measurements with a Fourier Transform Spectrometer Global Distributions of Dust & Gas in the Lunar Atmosphere may be determined most accurately with the highly sensitive technique of measurements of Solar IR Absorptions with a Infrared Spectrometer on a Lunar Orbiter, in full compliance with the NRC goal of measurements of Global Distributions. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Download File

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Mian M. Abbas

Co-Authors: A.C. LeClair, D. Tankosic, P.D. Craven, J.F. Spann, E.A. West
Importance of Measurements of Charging Properties of Individual Submicron Size Lunar Dust Grains It is absolutely necessary and of utmost importance to conduct the proposed measurements of charging properties of individual Apollo 11-17 submicron size dust grains by UV radiation and electron impact, at the lunar thermal cycle, for developing any believable lunar dust transportation models. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Download File

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William F. Bottke

Co-Authors: Carlton Allen, Mahesh Anand, Nadine Barlow, Donald Bogard, Gwen Barnes, Clark Chapman, Barbara A. Cohen, Ian A. Crawford, Andrew Daga, Luke Dones, Dean Eppler, Vera Assis Fernandes, Bernard H. Foing, Lisa R. Gaddis, Jim N. Head, Fredrick P. Horz, Brad Jolliff, Christian Koeberl, Michelle Kirchoff, David Kring, Harold F., Levison, Simone Marchi, Charles Meyer, David A. Minton, Stephen J. Mojzsis, Clive Neal, Laurence E. Nyquist, David Nesvorny, Anne Peslier, Noah Petro, Carle Pieters, Jeff Plescia, Mark Robinson, Greg Schmidt, Sen. Harrison H. Schmitt, John Spray, Sarah Stewart-Mukhopadhyay, Timothy Swindle, Lawrence Taylor, Ross Taylor, Mark Wieczorek, Nicolle Zellner, Maria Zuber
Exploring the Bombardment History of the Moon We discuss our priorities for exploring the Moon''s bombardment history: (1) Test the idea of a massive impactor spike 3.8-4.0 billion years ago. (2) Anchor the early Earth-Moon impact flux curve by determining the age of South Pole-Aitken Basin. (3) Establish a precise absolute chronology. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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Mark A. Bullock

Co-Authors: David A. Senske, Tibor. S. Balint, Alexis Benz, Bruce A. Campbell, Eric Chassefiere, Anthony Colaprete, James A. Cutts, Lori Glaze, Stephen Gorevan, David H. Grinspoon, Jeff Hall, George L. Hashimoto, James W. Head, Gary Hunter, Natasha Johnson, Viktor V. Kerzhanovich, Walter S. Kiefer, Elizabeth A. Kolawa, Tibor Kremic, Johnny Kwok, Sanjay S. Limaye, Stephen J. Mackwell, Mikhail Y. Marov, Adriana Ocampo, Gerald Schubert, Ellen R. Stofan, Hakan Svedhem, Dimitri V. Titov, Allen H. Treiman
The Venus Science and Technology Definition Team Flagship This white paper describes the scientific goals, objectives, instruments and mission architecture and design for a Flagship class mission to Venus. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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