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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Samuel J. Lawrence

Co-Authors: Georgiana Y. Kramer, Bradley L. Jolliff, B. Ray Hawke, Mark S. Robinson, Justin J. Hagerty, G. Jeffrey Taylor, Jeffrey Plescia, W. Brent Garry, Julie D. Stopar, Brett W. Denevi, S. E. Braden, L. R. Ostrach, David T. Blewett, Tomas Magna, Thomas R. Watters, Lisa R. Gaddis, Rongxing Li, Clive R. Neal, Jeffrey Gillis-Davis
Sampling the Age Extremes of Lunar Volcanism: the Youngest and Oldest Lunar Basalts Automated sample return missions to the youngest (Procellarum) and oldest (cryptomaria) basalts on the lunar surface will help improve our absolute chronology for the inner Solar System by providing the timing for the beginning and end of lunar basaltic volcanism. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Arizona State University Download File

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Georgiana Young Kramer

Co-Authors: David Blewett, Lon Hood, Jasper Halekas, Sarah Noble, Bernard Ray Hawke, Gunther Kletetschka, Erika Harnett, and Ian Garrick-Bethell
The Lunar Swirls The lunar swirls are high albedo curvilinear surface features coincident with regions of strong remanent magnetism. Investigating the lunar swirls is important to understand the Earth-Moon system, the interaction of planetary surfaces with the solar wind, and how to best explore our solar system. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Bear Fight Center Download File

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Ian Crawford

Co-Authors: Mahesh Anand, Professor Mark Burchell, James Carpenter, Barbara Cohen, Leon Croukamp, Andrew Daga, Hilary Downes, Sarah Fagents, Terence Hackwill, James N Head, Essam Heggy, Adrian Jones, Katherine Joy, Christian Koeberl, Philippe Lognonné, Clive Neal, Noah Petro, Professor Sara Russell, Joshua Snape, Larry Taylor, Allan Treiman, Shoshana Weider, Mark Wieczorek, Lionel Wilson
The Scientific Rationale for Renewed Human Exploration of the Moon This paper outlines the scientific benefits that will follow from renewed human exploration of the Moon. [Final version with updated author list] Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Birkbeck College London Download File

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Ian Garrick-Bethell

Co-Authors: Cassandra Runyon, Carle Pieters, Michael Wyatt, Peter Isaacson, Linda Elkins-Tanton
Ensuring United States Competitiveness in the 21st Century Global Economy with a Long-Term Lunar Exploration Program A focused Lunar Exploration Program can help retain United States economic and strategic leadership in the 21st century. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Brown University Download File

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Carle M. Pieters

Co-Authors: Carlton Allen, Mahesh Anand, W. Bruce Banerdt, William Bottke, Barbara Cohen, Ian A. Crawford, Andrew Daga, Rick Elphic, Bernard Foing, Lisa R. Gaddis, James B. Garvin, Timothy L. Grove, B. Ray Hawke, Jennifer Heldmann, Dana M. Hurley, Brad Jolliff, Christian Koeberl, Clive Neal, Brian J. O’Brien, Anne Peslier, Noah Petro, Jeffery Plescia, Amalie Sinclair, Timothy J. Stubbs, Ross Taylor, Stefanie Tompkins, Allan H. Treiman,Elizabeth Turtle, Mark Wieczorek, Lionel Wilson, Aileen Yingst
Summary and Highlights of the NRC 2007 Report: The Scientific Context for the Exploration of the Moon (SCEM) Understanding processes that have occurred on the Moon provide a framework for understanding the origin and evolution of the other terrestrial planets. The SCEM science goals and priorities remain fundamentally relevant to our understanding of the solar system and central to its exploration. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Brown University Download File

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Arlin Crotts On Lunar Volatiles and Their Importance to Resource Utilization and Lunar Science We discuss recent, compelling evidence for major lunar volatiles not necessarily found in polar permanently-shadowed crater cold traps, but originating from the deep interior. We also discuss programs underway to study lunar volatiles, which unfortunately fall far short of the NRC''s SCEM goals. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Columbia University Download File

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Yasunori Miura New lunar science and engineering with carbon cycle. New idea and technique with carbon cycle can be applied at lunar crust origin, lunar interior and lunar double construction (surfae and underground) building at the lunar base in future from new carbon-fixing cycle. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Earth & Planet. Material Sci., Yamaguchi University Download File

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Brad Jolliff

Co-Authors: Noah Petro, Leon Alkalai, Carlton Allen, Irene Antonenko, Lars Borg, William Bottke, Barbara Cohen, Michael Duke, Amy Fagan, Bernard Foing, Lisa Gaddis, John Gruener, Justin Hagerty, James Head III, Harold Hiesinger, Peter Isaacson, Randy Korotev, Georgiana Kramer, Samuel Lawrence, Gary Lofgren, Tomas Magna, Clive Neal, Marc Norman, Larry Nyquist, Gordon Osinski, Dimitri Papanastassiou, Carle Pieters, Bhairavi Shankar, Tim Swindle, G. Jeffrey Taylor, Allan Treiman, Paul Warren, Mark Wieczorek, Ryan Zeigler, Nicolle Zellner
Constraining Solar System impact history and evolution of the terrestrial planets with exploration of and samples from the Moon’s South Pole-Aitken Basin A fundamental issue of Solar System science is determining the early history of the terrestrial planets, including giant impact bombardment and the evolution of differentiated crust. Exploration and sampling of the Moon’s South Pole–Aitken Basin can illuminate these formative planetary processes. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Washington University, Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Brian J. O''Brien

Co-Author: James R.Gaier
Indicative Basic Issues about Lunar Dust in the Lunar Environment Basic issues of lunar dust - including recent discoveries -so fundamental they affect a wide range of lunar research and exploration must be recognised as priorities. Four Recommendations and Outcomes are given. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Western Australia Download File

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Anthony Wesley

Co-Authors: Glenn Orton, Padma Yanamandra-Fisher, Leigh Fletcher, Kevin Baines, Christopher Go, Makenzie Lystrup, Olivier Mousis, Imke de Pater, Jean-Pierre Lebreton, Kunio Sayanagi, Timothy Livengood, Tom Stallard, Henrik Mellin, Nigel Bannister
Ground-Based Support for Solar-System Exploration: Continuous Coverage Visible Light Imaging of Solar System Objects from a Network of Ground-Based Observatories We propose that the needs of planetary science for event-detection and time-critical observations could be well-served by a global network of low-cost remote-controlled (or autonomous) telescopes optimized for high-resolution visible light imaging of solar system targets. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Acquerra Pty Ltd. Download File

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Dana Backman SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) and Planetary Science This paper consists of the intro & observatory capabilities (ch. 1) plus the planetary science (ch. 5) portions of the SOFIA Science Vision doc pub. in 2009 as an update of the scientific case for SOFIA. D. Backman produced this extract; the original doc is authored by the SOFIA Science Team. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. SOFIA / SETI Institute Download File

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John F. Cooper

Co-Authors: Steven J. Sturner, Chris Paranicas, Matthew E. Hill, Abigail M. Rymer, Paul D. Cooper, Dan Pascu, Robert E. Johnson, Timothy A. Cassidy, Thomas M. Orlando, Kurt D. Retherford, Nathan A. Schwadron, Ralf I. Kaiser, François Leblanc, Louis J. Lanzerotti, Claudia J. Alexander, Henry B. Garrett, Amanda R. Hendrix, Wing H. Ip
Space Weathering Impact on Solar System Surfaces and Mission Science Space weathering is the collection of physical processes acting to erode and chemically modify planetary surfaces directly exposed to space environments of planetary magnetospheres, the heliosphere, and the local interstellar environment of the solar system. Space weathering affects the physical and Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Eberhard Gruen

Co-Authors: Frank Postberg, Harald Krüger, Mihaly Horanyi, Elmar Jessberger Sascha Kempf, Ralf Srama, Thomas Stephan, Zoltan Sternovsky
In-Situ Mass Spectrometry of Atmosphereless Planetary Objects Dust particles emitted from atmosphereless planetary objects are samples of their surfaces. By mass analyzing these particles and tracing back their trajectories to their sources the surface composition of Mercury, planetary satellites, dusty rings sources, asteroids and comets can be obtained. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. LASP, University of Colorado Download File

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David Grinspoon

Co-Authors: Mark Bullock, James Kasting, Janet Luhmann, Peter Read, Scot Rafkin, Sanjay Limaye, Kevin McGouldrick, Gordon Chin, Samuel Gulkis, Feng Tian, Eric Chassefiere, Hakan Svedhem, Vikki Meadows
Comparative Planetary Climate Studies It is the purpose of this White Paper to draw attention to, and summarize, the important role that planetary exploration, and research with a comparative planetology focus, have played and should continue to play in our understanding of climate, and climate change, on Earth. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Denver Museum of Nature & Science Download File

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Friedemann T. Freund Previously Overlooked/Ignored Electronic Charge Carriers in Rocks I would like to draw the attention of members of the Decadal Survey Committee to a rather fundamental discovery, which (I believe) will have a major impact on the Earth and Planetary Sciences in the coming years. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. NASA Ames Research Center/ SETI Institute Download File

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Andrew Daga

Co-Authors: Carlton Allen, James Burke, Ian Crawford, Richard Leveille, Steven Simon, Lin Tze Tan
Lunar and Martian Lava Tube Exploration as Part of an Overall Scientific Survey This paper discusses the opportunity to search for and exploit lava tubes on the surfaces of the Moon and Mars as a means of enabling ambitious planetary science missions. [FINAL VERSION] Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Andrew Daga & Associates LLC Download File

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Michael H. Wong

Co-Authors: Máté Ádámkovics, Sushil K. Atreya, Don Banfield, Jim Bell, Susan Benecchi, Gordon Bjoraker, John R. Casani, John T. Clarke, Imke de Pater, Scott G. Edgington, Leigh N. Fletcher, Richard G. French, William Grundy, Amanda R. Hendrix, Erich Karkoschka, Jian-Yang Li, Franck Marchis, Melissa A. McGrath, William J. Merline, Julianne I. Moses, Keith Noll, Glenn S. Orton, Kathy A. Rages, Kurt Retherford, Kunio Sayanagi, Nick Schneider, Eric H. Smith, Lawrence A. Sromovsky, Nathan J. Strange, Anne Verbiscer, Padmavati A. Yanamandra-Fisher
A dedicated space observatory for time-domain solar system science The specific requirements for time-domain solar system science are adequate sampling rates and campaign durations. The observatory must be spaceborne both to satisfy the time-domain requirements as well as to maintain access to the dynamically significant ultraviolet spectral range. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. University of California Berkeley / STScI Download File

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Edward R. Martinez

Co-Author: Robert V. Frampton
Thermal Protection System Sensors This paper advocates for the development of an aeroshell TPS sensor system to the benefit of all atmospheric reentry missions Agency wide. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Carl Pilcher

Co-Authors: Kevin P. Hand, Patricia M. Beauchamp, David Des Marais, David Grinspoon, Karen J. Meech, Sean N. Raymond
Astrobiology Priorities for Planetary Science Flight Missions We have posited in another white paper that all of Planetary System Science can be seen through an astrobiological lens. In this paper we present priorities for flight mission investigations derived by applying that lens to the Planetary Science flight mission program. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Astrobiology Institute, NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Carl Pilcher

Co-Authors: Kevin P. Hand, Patricia M. Beauchamp, David Des Marais, David Grinspoon, Karen J. Meech, Sean N. Raymond
An Astrobiological Lens on Planetary System Science Astrobiology provides a lens through which all of planetary science and solar system exploration, as well as life on Earth, can be viewed. Astrobiology, like planetary science, is a systems-level science. In planetary science, one must understand connections be [CHARACTERS NOT ACCEPTED BEYOND THIS Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Astrobiology Institute, NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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