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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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James B. Garvin

Co-Authors: Lori S. Glaze, Sushil Atreya, Bruce Campbell, Don Campbell, Peter Ford, Walter Kiefer, Frank Lemoine, Greg Neumann, Roger Phillips, Keith Raney
Venus: Constraining Crustal Evolution from Orbit Via High-Resolution Geophysical and Geological Reconnaissance Major gaps in understanding Venus include how planetary-scale crustal resurfacing operated, the formation and evolution of highlands, and whether evidence of past environments is preserved. These questions can be addressed through an orbiting radar altimeter and high resolution SAR imager. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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John F. Cooper

Co-Authors: Steven J. Sturner, Chris Paranicas, Matthew E. Hill, Abigail M. Rymer, Paul D. Cooper, Dan Pascu, Robert E. Johnson, Timothy A. Cassidy, Thomas M. Orlando, Kurt D. Retherford, Nathan A. Schwadron, Ralf I. Kaiser, François Leblanc, Louis J. Lanzerotti, Claudia J. Alexander, Henry B. Garrett, Amanda R. Hendrix, Wing H. Ip
Space Weathering Impact on Solar System Surfaces and Mission Science Space weathering is the collection of physical processes acting to erode and chemically modify planetary surfaces directly exposed to space environments of planetary magnetospheres, the heliosphere, and the local interstellar environment of the solar system. Space weathering affects the physical and Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Michael R. Collier

Co-Authors: Thomas E. Cravens, Mats Holmstrom, James Burch, Konrad Dennerl, Herbert Gunell, David G. Sibeck, Steven Snowden, F. Scott Porter, Ina P. Robertson, Nick Omidi, Kip Kuntz, Steven Sembay, Jennifer Carter, Andrew Read, Dimitra Koutroumpa, Massimiliano Galeazzi, Susan Lepri, K.C. Hansen, Dan McCammon, Ruth Skoug, H. Kent Hills, Timothy J. Stubbs, Pavel M. Travnicek, George Fraser, Mark Lester
Global Imaging of Solar Wind-Planetary Body Interactions using Soft X-ray Cameras We show in this white paper that, with suitable instrumentation on planetary and terrestrial spacecraft, soft X-ray emission associated with the solar wind interaction with planetary neutral atoms can map out the solar wind distribution around planets, including the locations of plasma boundaries. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Carl Pilcher

Co-Authors: Kevin P. Hand, Patricia M. Beauchamp, David Des Marais, David Grinspoon, Karen J. Meech, Sean N. Raymond
An Astrobiological Lens on Planetary System Science Astrobiology provides a lens through which all of planetary science and solar system exploration, as well as life on Earth, can be viewed. Astrobiology, like planetary science, is a systems-level science. In planetary science, one must understand connections be [CHARACTERS NOT ACCEPTED BEYOND THIS Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Astrobiology Institute, NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Carl Pilcher

Co-Authors: Kevin P. Hand, Patricia M. Beauchamp, David Des Marais, David Grinspoon, Karen J. Meech, Sean N. Raymond
Astrobiology Priorities for Planetary Science Flight Missions We have posited in another white paper that all of Planetary System Science can be seen through an astrobiological lens. In this paper we present priorities for flight mission investigations derived by applying that lens to the Planetary Science flight mission program. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Astrobiology Institute, NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Friedemann T. Freund Previously Overlooked/Ignored Electronic Charge Carriers in Rocks I would like to draw the attention of members of the Decadal Survey Committee to a rather fundamental discovery, which (I believe) will have a major impact on the Earth and Planetary Sciences in the coming years. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. NASA Ames Research Center/ SETI Institute Download File

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Ethiraj Venkatapathy

Co-Authors: Bernard Laub, Joseph L. Conley, Helen H. Hwang, James Arnold, Christine E. Szalai, Jim Tibaudo, Robert Knudsen, Andrew Chambers, David Atkinson, Sushil K. Atreva, Joseph M. Vellinga, William H. Willcockson, Janine M. Thornton, Nicholas G. Smith, Richard A. Hund, John Dec, Max L. Blosser, Michelle M. Munk, Robert Maddock, Prasun N. Desai, Walter Engelund, Stephen Sandford, David A. Gilman, Steven W. Gayle, John Kowal, Christopher B. Madden, Stan Bouslog, Brian J. Remark, Donald Curry, Scott Coughlin, Adam J. Amar, Kevin H. Baines, Tibor Balint, Bernard Bienstock, George T. Chen, James A. Cutts, Jeffery L. Hall, Samad A. Hayati, Pamela J. Hoffman, Linda Spilker, Romasso P. Rivellini, Robert Manning, Eric M. Slimko, Adam D. Steltzner, Thomas Spilker, Jeffrey Umland, Charles Kiskiras, Duane Baker, Thomas Foster, Dominic Calamito, James B. Garvin, Timothy A. Sauerwein, Sharon Seipel, Lori S. Glaze, Spencer Stolis, Mark Lippold, Francis Schwind, James Thompson, Raj Narayan, Thomas Andrews, Conley Thatcher, Edwin B. Curry, John McKinney, Robert Frampton, Todd Stever, Charley Bown, William Congdon, Jennifer Congdon, Daniel M. Empey, Joe Hartman, Dinesh Prabhu, Nancy L. Mangini, Kristina A. Skokova, Margaret M. Stackpoole, Tood White, Howard Goldstein, Melmoth Covington, Robin A. Beck, Carol W. Carroll, Charles A. Smith, Deepak Bose, Anthony Colaprete, David M. Driver, Edward Martinez, Donald T. Ellerby, Matthew J. Gasch, Aga M. Goodsell, James Reuther, Sylvia M. Johnson, Dean Kontinos, Mary Livingston, Michael J. Wright, Harry Partridge, George A. Raiche, Huy K. Tran, Kerry A. Trumble
Thermal Protection System Technologies for Enabling Future Mars/Titan Science Missions This paper describes currently available TPS technologies and identifies new technologies needed to support Mars missions in the 2013 - 2022 timeframe, drawing on past mission studies, recent Mars Technology workshop for Mars Sample Return Mission, and the Solar System Exploration road map. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos.Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Ethiraj Venkatapathy

Co-Authors: James Arnold,Bernard Laub, Helen H. Hwang, Christine E. Szalai, Joseph L. Conley, Jim Tibaudo, Robert Knudsen, Andrew Chambers, David Atkinson, Sushil K. Atreva, Joseph M. Vellinga, William H. Willcockson, Janine M. Thornton, Nicholas G. Smith, Richard A. Hund, John Dec, Max L. Blosser, Michelle M. Munk, Robert Maddock, Prasun N. Desai, Walter Engelund, Stephen Sandford, David A. Gilman, Steven W. Gayle, John Kowal, Christopher B. Madden, Stan Bouslog, Brian J. Remark, Donald Curry, Scott Coughlin, Adam J. Amar, Kevin H. Baines, Tibor Balint, Bernard Bienstock, George T. Chen, James A. Cutts, Jeffery L. Hall, Samad A. Hayati, Pamela J. Hoffman, Linda Spilker, Romasso P. Rivellini, Robert Manning, Eric M. Slimko, Adam D. Steltzner, Thomas Spilker, Jeffrey Umland, Charles Kiskiras, Duane Baker, Thomas Foster, Dominic Calamito, James B. Garvin, Timothy A. Sauerwein, Sharon Seipel, Lori S. Glaze, Spencer Stolis, Mark Lippold, Francis Schwind, James Thompson, Raj Narayan, Thomas Andrews, Conley Thatcher, Edwin B. Curry, John McKinney, Robert Frampton,Todd Stever, Charley Bown, William Congdon, Jennifer Congdon, Daniel M. Empey, Joe Hartman, Dinesh Prabhu, Nancy L. Mangini, Kristina A. Skokova, Margaret M. Stackpoole, Tood White, Howard Goldstein, Melmoth Covington, Robin A. Beck, Carol W. Carroll, Charles A. Smith, Deepak Bose, Anthony Colaprete, David M. Driver, Edward Martinez, Donald T. Ellerby, Matthew J. Gasch, Aga M. Goodsell, James Reuther, Sylvia M. Johnson, Dean Kontinos, Mary Livingston, Michael J. Wright, Harry Partridge, George A. Raiche, Huy K. Tran, Kerry A. Trumble
Thermal Protection System Technologies for Enabling Future Outer Planet Missions This paper discusses the capability of heritage TPS technology used on the Galileo probe and new materials required for future outer planet probe missions. A prime conclusion is that there are important issues regarding the availability of the TPS required for Outer Planet entry probes. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Ethiraj Venkatapathy

Co-Authors: Christine E. Szalai, Bernard Laub, Helen H. Hwang, Joseph L. Conley, James Arnold, Jim Tibaudo, Robert Knudsen, Andrew Chambers, David Atkinson, Sushil K. Atreva, Joseph M. Vellinga, William H. Willcockson, Janine M. Thornton, Nicholas G. Smith, Richard A. Hund, John Dec, Max L. Blosser, Michelle M. Munk, Robert Maddock, Prasun N. Desai, Walter Engelund, Stephen Sandford, David A. Gilman, Steven W. Gayle, John Kowal, Christopher B. Madden, Stan Bouslog, Brian J. Remark, Donald Curry, Scott Coughlin, Adam J. Amar, Kevin H. Baines, Tibor Balint, Bernard Bienstock, George T. Chen, James A. Cutts, Jeffery L. Hall, Samad A. Hayati, Pamela J. Hoffman, Linda Spilker, Romasso P. Rivellini, Robert Manning, Eric M. Slimko, Adam D. Steltzner, Thomas Spilker, Jeffrey Umland, Charles Kiskiras, Duane Baker, Thomas Foster, Dominic Calamito, James B. Garvin, Timothy A. Sauerwein, Sharon Seipel, Lori S. Glaze, Spencer Stolis, Mark Lippold, Francis Schwind, James Thompson, Raj Narayan, Thomas Andrews, Conley Thatcher, Edwin B. Curry, John McKinney, Robert Frampton, Todd Stever, Charley Bown, William Congdon, Jennifer Congdon, Daniel M. Empey, Joe Hartman, Dinesh Prabhu, Nancy L. Mangini, Kristina A. Skokova, Margaret M. Stackpoole, Tood White, Howard Goldstein, Melmoth Covington, Robin A. Beck, Carol W. Carroll, Charles A. Smith, Deepak Bose, Anthony Colaprete, David M. Driver, Edward Martinez, Donald T. Ellerby, Matthew J. Gasch, Aga M. Goodsell, James Reuther, Sylvia M. Johnson, Dean Kontinos, Mary Livingston, Michael J. Wright, Harry Partridge, George A. Raiche, Huy K. Tran, Kerry A. Trumble
Thermal Protection System Technologies for Enabling Future Sample Return Missions Currently available TPS materials can meet the needs of Sample Return missions with entry velocity <13 km/s. For entry velocity >13 km/s, heritage carbon phenolic is fully capable, but potentially unavailable and currently available TPS will need to be qualified. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Ethiraj Venkatapathy

Co-Authors: Helen H. Hwang, Bernard Laub, Joseph L. Conley, James Arnold, Christine E. Szalai, Jim Tibaudo, Robert Knudsen, Andrew Chambers, David Atkinson, Sushil K. Atreva, Joseph M. Vellinga, William H. Willcockson, Janine M. Thornton, Nicholas G. Smith, Richard A. Hund, John Dec,Max L. Blosser, Michelle M. Munk, Robert Maddock, Prasun N. Desai, Walter Engelund, Stephen Sandford, David A. Gilman, Steven W. Gayle, John Kowal, Christopher B. Madden, Stan Bouslog, Brian J. Remark, Donald Curry, Scott Coughlin, Adam J. Amar, Kevin H. Baines, Tibor Balint, Bernard Bienstock, George T. Chen, James A. Cutts, Jeffery L. Hall, Samad A. Hayati, Pamela J. Hoffman, Linda Spilker, Romasso P. Rivellini, Robert Manning, Eric M. Slimko, Adam D. Steltzner, Thomas Spilker, Jeffrey Umland, Charles Kiskiras, Duane Baker, Thomas Foster, Dominic Calamito, James B. Garvin, Timothy A. Sauerwein, Sharon Seipel, Lori S. Glaze, Spencer Stolis, Mark Lippold, Francis Schwind, James Thompson, Raj Narayan, Thomas Andrews, Conley Thatcher, Edwin B. Curry, John McKinney, Robert Frampton, Todd Stever, Charley Bown, William Congdon, Jennifer Congdon, Daniel M. Empey, Joe Hartman, Dinesh Prabhu, Nancy L. Mangini, Kristina A. Skokova, Margaret M. Stackpoole, Tood White, Howard Goldstein, Melmoth Covington, Robin A. Beck, Carol W. Carroll, Charles A. Smith, Deepak Bose, Anthony Colaprete, David M. Driver, Edward Martinez, Donald T. Ellerby, Matthew J. Gasch, Aga M. Goodsell, James Reuther, Sylvia M. Johnson, Dean Kontinos, Mary Livingston, Michael J. Wright, Harry Partridge, George A. Raiche, Huy K. Tran, Kerry A. Trumble
Thermal Protection System Technologies for Enabling Future Venus Exploration This paper discusses the capability of currently available TPS and the availability of heritage carbon phenolic used on the Pioneer-Venus probes. A prime conclusion is that there are important issues regarding the availability of the TPS required for future Venus entry probes. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Tore Straume Solar Radiation Output: Reading the Record of Lunar Rocks Reconstructing solar energetic particle output by measuring signatures in lunar surface samples Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Robert Schingler

Co-Authors: William Marshall, Alex MacDonald, Mark Lupisella, Brian Lewis
ROSI - Return on Science Investment A system for mission evaluation based on maximizing science None of the above. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Scott Sandford

Co-Authors: Michael A’Hearn, Louis J. Allamandola, Daniel Britt, Benton Clark, Jason P. Dworkin, George Flynn, Danny Glavin, Robert Hanel, Martha Hanner, Fred Hörz, Lindsay Keller, Scott Messenger, Nicholas Smith, Frank Stadermann, Darren Wade, Ernst Zinner, Michael E. Zolensky
The Comet Coma Rendezvous Sample Return (CCRSR) Mission Concept – The Next Step Beyond Stardust This paper describes the scientific goals and implementation design of the Comet Coma Rendezvous and Sample Return (CCRSR) mission, one of the concept study missions funded by the recent NASA DSCME Program. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Andrew Pohorille

Co-Authors: Leslie Bebout, Devaki Bhaya, Rocco Mancinelli
Limits of Terrestrial Life in Space To pursue a better understanding of life in space and link it to future missions we propose a strategy aimed at determining the potential for terrestrial microbial life to adapt and evolve in space environments. This strategy involves ground-based research, small satellite missions and will culminat None of the above. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Edward R. Martinez

Co-Author: Robert V. Frampton
Thermal Protection System Sensors This paper advocates for the development of an aeroshell TPS sensor system to the benefit of all atmospheric reentry missions Agency wide. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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David J. Loftus

Co-Authors: Erin M. Tranfield, Jon C. Rask, Clara McCrosssin
The Chemical Reactivity of Lunar Dust Relevant to Human Exploration As NASA prepares to return to the Moon, a clear understanding of the chemistry of lunar dust is required to set the stage for extended duration lunar surface operations. All aspects of the unique environment of the Moon—micrometeorite bombardment, UV light exposure, solar wind radiation, solar parti Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Mark Skidmore

Co-Authors: John Priscu, Brent Christner
Planetary Science & Astrobiology: Cold habitats for life in the Solar system The paper highlights that improved knowledge of the carbon and energy transformations necessary to support life at sub-zero temperatures is key to future planetary science and astrobiological research given ice is the most abundant phase of water in the Solar system. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Montana State University Download File

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Michael D. Max

Co-Authors: Stephen M. Clifford, Arthur H. Johnson, Jeremie Lasue
Is a Resource-Mars a Stepping-Stone to Human Exploration of the Solar System? Methane and water on Mars are the key to a resource base to support sustainable exploration of Mars and beyond Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. MDS Research, LLC Download File

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James W. Ashley

Co-Authors: M. D. Fries, G. R. Huss, J. E. Chappelow, M. P. Golombek, M. A. Velbel, S. W. Ruff, C. Schröder, W. H. Farrand, D. D. Durda, P. A. Bland, I. Fleischer, A. C. McAdam, S. P. Wright, A. T. Knudson, L. A. Leshin, and A. Steele
The Scientific Rationale for Studying Meteorites found on Other Worlds The ongoing identification of several meteorite candidates on Mars is ushering in a new discipline in the planetary sciences. We feel that cultivating an appreciation for the potential science return represented by meteoritic specimens on Mars and the Moon may be important for the 2013-2022 decade. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Mars Space Flight Facility, Arizona State University Download File

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Allan Treiman

Co-Authors: Meenakshi Wadhwa, Clive R. Neal, Charles K. Shearer, Bradley L. Jolliff, Lars E. Borg, Dimitri Papanastassiou, Malcolm J. Rutherford, Christine Floss, Andrew M. Davis, Steven Symes, Susanne Schwenzer, Mark D. Fries, Andrew Westphall, Barbara Cohen, David A. Kring
Sample Return from the Earth’s Moon This white paper makes the case that sample return from selected locations on the Moon in the coming decade will provide extraordinary advances in lunar and Solar System science. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Lunar and Planetary Institute Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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