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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Eldar Z. Noe Dobrea

Co-Authors: S. Murchie, J.F. Mustard, J.L. Bishop, N.K. McKeown
Near-Infrared imaging spectroscopy of the surface of Mars at meter-scales to constrain the geological origin of hydrous alteration products, identify candidate sites and samples for future in-situ and sample return missions, and guide rover operations Near-infrared imaging spectrometers capable of mapping hydrous minerals on the surface of Mars at meter-scales from orbit, as well as hypespectral NIR imagers on landed rovers not only enhance the scientific return of orbital and rover missions, but will be critical in guiding future rover operation Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Planetary Science Institute Download File

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Athena Coustenis

Co-Authors: J. Lunine, D. Matson, K. Reh, P. Beauchamp, J.-M.Charbonnier, L. Bruzzone, M.-T. Capria, A. Coates, C. Hansen, R. Jaumann, J.-P. Lebreton, R. Lopes, R. Lorenz, I. Mueller-Wodarg, F. Raulin, E. Sittler, J. Soderblom, F. Sohl, C. Sotin, T. Spilker, N. Strange, T. Tokano, E. Turtle, H. Waite, L. Gurvits, C. Nixon, T. Livengood, J. Blamont, R. Achterberg, M. Allen, C. Anderson, D. Atkinson, T. Balint, G. Bampasidis, D. Banfield, A. Bar-Nun, J. Barnes, R. Beebe, E. Bierhaus, G. Bjoraker, D. Burr, F. Crary, J. Cui, J. Elliott, M. Flasar, A. Friedson, M. Galand, D. Gautier, M. Gurwell, J. Head, M. Hirtzig, T. Hurford, T. Johnson, K. Klaus, W. Kurth, E. Lellouch, J. Martin-Torres, K. Mitchell, X. Moussas, M. Munk, C. Neish, L. Norman, B. Noyelles, G. Orton, A. Pankine, D. Pascu , E. Pencil, S. Rafkin, T. Ray, F. Rocard, S. Rodriguez, A. Solomonidou, L. Spilker, R. West, D. Williams, E. Wilson, M. Wright, V. Zivkovic
Future in situ balloon exploration of Titan’s atmosphere and surface Many of the questions remaining to be addressed after the Cassini-Huygens mission require both remote and in situ exploration. Our understanding of the lower atmosphere, surface and interior of Titan will benefit greatly from detailed investigations by a montgolfiere, reaching a variety of locations Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Paris Observatory, France Download File

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Julian Nott

Co-Authors: Kim Reh, Jonathan Lunine, David L. Pierce, Patricia Beauchamp, Tim Colonius, R.C. Downs, Jerrold Marsden, Carl F. Braun, Don Day, Michael Arnold, Wade Allmon, Dick Bohannnon, Alberto Elfes, John Elliot, Debora Fairbrother, Jack Jones, Jeff Hall, Greg Mungas, Michael Pauken, Rob Sinclair, Luke Brooke, David Wakefield
Advanced Titan Balloon Design Concepts Numerous studies agree that Titan is of outstanding scientific interest and Montgolfiere balloons ideal for its exploration. This paper examines balloon operations, weather and steering. It suggests novel concepts that may encourage radical thinking about Titan balloon designs. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Nott Technology LLC Download File

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Julian Nott Titan’s unique attraction: it is an ideal destination for humans With so many opportunities in the Solar System it may be hard to choose destinations. Titan has a one quality that sets it apart: it is uniquely suitable for humans. One reason for robotic Mars exploration is that humans will arrive in due course. An identical justification applies to exploring Titan Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Nott Technology LLC Download File

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Amy S. Lo

Co-Authors: Howard Eller, Dean Dailey, Eric Drucker, James Wehner
Secondary Payloads Using LCROSS Architecture The ESPA architecture used by the LCROSS mission enables two capable missions for the cost of one launch. This paper describes our approach for leveraging the capability of the new generation of EELVs to enable secondary planetary missions at well below the cost of an independently launched mission. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems Download File

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Reta F. Beebe

Co-Authors: Charles Acton, Raymond Arvidson, Jim Bell, Dan Boice, Scott Bolton, Steven Bougher, William Boynton, Daniel Britt, Marc Buie, Joseph Burns, Maria Teresa Capria, Angioletta Coradini, Daniel Crichton, Peter Ford, Richard French, Lisa Gaddis, Peter Gierasch, Randy Gladstone, Mitch Gordon, Ronald Greeley, Kenneth Hansen, Jakosky, Bruce, Yasumara Kasaba, Krishan Khurana, William Kurth, Emil Law, Ralph Lorenz, Conor Nixon, Chris Paranicus, Wayne Pryor, Thomas Roatsch, Chris Russell, Gerhard Schwehm, Richard Simpson, Mark Sykes, Dave Tholen, Raymond Walker, Paul Withers, Joseph Zender
Data Management, Preservation and the Future of PDS This paper summarizes the history, evolution and current status of analysis and archiving of planetary science data. It presents goals for PDS 2010, a revised PDS, and addresses conditions needed to achieve those goals. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. New Mexico State University Download File

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Naoya Imae Supporting the sample return from Mars I heartfully indicate the support on the sample return mission from Mars, and the indispensable facilities in laboratories. Because the sample return mission is the keys of essential problems for Planetary Science. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. National Institute of Polar Research Download File

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Mian M. Abbas

Co-Authors: A.C. LeClair, D. Tankosic, P.D. Craven, J.F. Spann, E.A. West
Importance of Measurements of Charging Properties of Individual Submicron Size Lunar Dust Grains It is absolutely necessary and of utmost importance to conduct the proposed measurements of charging properties of individual Apollo 11-17 submicron size dust grains by UV radiation and electron impact, at the lunar thermal cycle, for developing any believable lunar dust transportation models. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Download File

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Mian. M. Abbas

Co-Authors: A.C. LeClair, D. Tankosic, D.L. Gallagher, R.B. Sheldon, E.A. West, J.C. Brasunas, D.E. Jennings
Global Distributions of Gas & Dust in the Lunar Atmosphere from Solar Infrared Absorption Measurements with a Fourier Transform Spectrometer Global Distributions of Dust & Gas in the Lunar Atmosphere may be determined most accurately with the highly sensitive technique of measurements of Solar IR Absorptions with a Infrared Spectrometer on a Lunar Orbiter, in full compliance with the NRC goal of measurements of Global Distributions. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Download File

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Michael J. Kavaya Mars Orbiting Pulsed Doppler Wind Lidar for Characterization of Wind and Dust Technology is described which is well developed and on a path for space. This technology could be used in Mars orbit to provide a global climatology of wind and relative dust as a function of location and altitude. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. NASA Langley Research Center Download File

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Paul A. Abell

Co-Authors: Daniel Adamo, Thomas Jones, David Korsmeyer, Rob Landis
Scientific Investigation of Near-Earth Objects via the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle NASA has examined the feasibility of sending the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle to near-Earth objects during the next decade and beyond as part of its future Human Space Flight program. This paper describes the in-depth scientific investigations that could be accomplished by such missions. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Johnson Space Center / Planetary Science Institute Download File

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Robert M. Kelso A commercially-leveraged, science-focused, lunar exploration program Summarizes the NASA work in assessing use of commercially-demonstrated landers and comm systems to enable early access to the lunar surface for science and exploration. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Headquarters Download File

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Barry Geldzahler

Co-Author: Les Deutsch
Future Plans for the Deep Space Network (DSN) NASA’s Deep Space Network (DSN) is a critical part of every NASA solar system mission, serving as the entity that ties the spacecraft back to Earth and providing data from science instruments, information for navigating across the solar system, and valuable radio link science and radar observations. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Headquarters Download File

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W. M. Farrell

Co-Author: Mihaly Horanyi
The Lunar Dusty Exosphere: The Extreme Case of an Inner Planetary Atmosphere The Moon is an extreme type of atmosphere – a surface bounded exosphere – and may represent the final ‘ground state’ of any geologically dormant body. Neutral gas and dust are emitted from its surface via universal processes believed to be occurring at all near-airless bodies. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / University of Colorado Download File

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George Sonneborn

Co-Authors: J. Lunine, R. Doyon, M. McCoughrean, M. Rieke
Study of Planetary Systems and Solar System Objects with JWST Determination of the physical and chemical properties of planetary systems is a key scientific goal of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). This white paper summarizes the mission’s capabilities in our solar system and extrasolar planetary systems. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Michael D. Smith

Co-Authors: Mark Allen, Donald Banfield, Jeffrey Barnes, R. Todd Clancy, Philip James, James Kasting, Paul Wennberg, Daniel Winterhalter, Michael Wolff, Richard Zurek
Mars Trace Gas Mission: Scientific Goals and Measurement Objectives Trace gases are a sensitive indicator of current martian activity, whether photochemical or biogeochemical. A Trace Gas Mission measuring atmospheric composition, circulation and state, and locating active sources would characterize this activity and its implications for climate and astrobiology. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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David E. Smith A budget phasing approach to Europa Jupiter System Mission Science Due to budget constraints, the proposed Europa Jupiter System Mission is unlikely to occur as planned. We propose to split EJSM into three small, more affordable and less risky missions that return science earlier (about the same time as the launch date of ELSM) and in easier to accomodate budgets. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. NASA Goddard Space Flight Cener Download File

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Stephen M. Merkowitz

Co-Authors: Edward Aaron, Neil Ashby, David Carrier, Douglas Currie, John J. Degnan, Simone Dell’Agnello, Giovanni Delle Monache, Jan McGarry, Thomas W. Murphy, Jr., Kenneth Nordtvedt, Robert D. Reasenberg, Slava G. Turyshev, James G. Williams, Thomas Zagwodzki
The Moon as a Test Body for General Relativity This whitepaper describes how the next generation of lunar laser ranging addresses four key gravitational science questions. In addition, we discuss the current state of retroreflector technology and describe ways in which further advances can be made in laser ranging technologies. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Terry Hurford

Co-Authors: B. Buratti, A. Coustenis, A. Dombard, R. Greenberg, H. Hussmann, M. Kirchoff, C. Porco, A. Rymer, S. Vance, A. Verbiscer
The Case for Enceladus Science In this white paper, we will outline important science questions regarding Enceladus and show the link between these science questions and major themes of exploration as identified by NASA. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Terry Hurford

Co-Authors: B. Buratti, A. Coustenis, A. Dombard, R. Greenberg, H. Hussmann, M. Kirchoff, C. Porco, A. Rymer
The Case for an Enceladus New Frontiers Mission In this white paper, we will summarize one possible mission concept to explore Enceladus within a New Frontiers-level mission: to stay below the cost cap of $650M (FY09 dollars) and within the launch capability of the Atlas V 551. We imagine that there are other possible mission scenarios... Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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