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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Richard S. Miller

Co-Authors: M. Bonamente, S. O’Brien, W. S. Paciesas, M. Bonamente, S. O’Brien, W. S. Paciesas, C. A. Young, D. Ebbets
Lunar Occultation Observer - A Nuclear Astrophysics Mission Concept using the Moon as a Platform for Science The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) is a gamma-ray astrophysics mission concept being developed to probe the nuclear regime. Using the Moon to occult astrophysical sources as they rise and set along the lunar limb, the encoded temporal modulation will be used to image the sky and enable science. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. None of the above. University of Alabama in Huntsville Download File

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Douglas Stetson

Co-Authors: Jim Bell, Lou Friedman
Mars Exploration 2016-2032: Rationale and Principles for a Strategic Program The Mars Exploration Program, one of the most visible and dynamic elements of NASA space science, is at a crossroads. To ensure a robust future it must embrace the related goals of life and sample return, and must begin to bridge the historical gap between robotic and human exploration. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. The Planetary Society (consultant) Download File

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William B.C. Crandall A Decadal Shift: From Space Exploration Science to Space Utilization Science We urge the Decadal Survey Committee, which is charged with developing “a comprehensive science and mission strategy for planetary science,” to temporarily shift research priorities in the United States from space exploration science to space utilization science. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Space Wealth Download File

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Amalie Sinclair Lunar Light -Planetary Renewal- A Holistic Viewpoint This paper sets out some rationales for an integrated US space development platform within the UN forums . Such a platform might include for an international lunar settlement and for a related space sciences initiative into global development Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Space for Progress Download File

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Eliot F. Young

Co-Authors: Charles Hibbitts, Joshua Emery, Amanda Hendrix, William Merline, William Grundy, Kurt Retherford
Balloon-Borne Telescopes for Planetary Science: Imaging and Photometry This white paper advocates the use of balloon-borne telescopes for diffraction-limited imaging in visible wavelengths by demonstrating their technical readiness and low cost relative to space- and ground-based facilities. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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James D. Walker

Co-Authors: Walter F. Huebner, Sidney Chocron, Walt Gray, Daniel Boice
Active Seismology of Asteroids through Impact and/or Blast Loading We have no direct data on the interior structure of primitive bodies. The interior structure of asteroids is relevant to most solar system formation and evolution theories. Seismology is the only method for determining the interior structure for a range of sizes of asteroids to address. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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J. Hunter, Jr. Waite

Co-Authors: T. Brockwell, D.T. Young, W.S. Lewis, C.P. McKay, Francois Raulin, G. Schubert
Titan Lake Probe This White Paper describes the concept for a Titan Lake Probe, which could be implemented either as an element of a TSSM-type mission or as a stand-alone New Frontiers mission. The Lake Probe could be configured either as a boat or, for increased science return, as a submersible. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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Scot Rafkin

Co-Authors: Robert. M. Haberle, Don Banfield, Jeff. Barnes
The Value of Landed Meteorological Investigations on Mars: The Next Advance for Climate Science Major advances in the understanding of the present and past Mars climate system are most likely to be accomplished by in situ meteorological surface measurements operating from both a network configuration and individual stations. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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Robert Grimm Electromagnetic Sounding of Solid Planets and Satellites EM methods can sense subsurface structure from meters to a thousand kilometers. This white paper gives a tutorial on material sensitivities, exploration depths, sources, and particularly what measurements must be made for different target bodies, without specific mission endorsements. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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Mark A. Bullock

Co-Authors: David A. Senske, Tibor. S. Balint, Alexis Benz, Bruce A. Campbell, Eric Chassefiere, Anthony Colaprete, James A. Cutts, Lori Glaze, Stephen Gorevan, David H. Grinspoon, Jeff Hall, George L. Hashimoto, James W. Head, Gary Hunter, Natasha Johnson, Viktor V. Kerzhanovich, Walter S. Kiefer, Elizabeth A. Kolawa, Tibor Kremic, Johnny Kwok, Sanjay S. Limaye, Stephen J. Mackwell, Mikhail Y. Marov, Adriana Ocampo, Gerald Schubert, Ellen R. Stofan, Hakan Svedhem, Dimitri V. Titov, Allen H. Treiman
The Venus Science and Technology Definition Team Flagship This white paper describes the scientific goals, objectives, instruments and mission architecture and design for a Flagship class mission to Venus. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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William F. Bottke

Co-Authors: Carlton Allen, Mahesh Anand, Nadine Barlow, Donald Bogard, Gwen Barnes, Clark Chapman, Barbara A. Cohen, Ian A. Crawford, Andrew Daga, Luke Dones, Dean Eppler, Vera Assis Fernandes, Bernard H. Foing, Lisa R. Gaddis, Jim N. Head, Fredrick P. Horz, Brad Jolliff, Christian Koeberl, Michelle Kirchoff, David Kring, Harold F., Levison, Simone Marchi, Charles Meyer, David A. Minton, Stephen J. Mojzsis, Clive Neal, Laurence E. Nyquist, David Nesvorny, Anne Peslier, Noah Petro, Carle Pieters, Jeff Plescia, Mark Robinson, Greg Schmidt, Sen. Harrison H. Schmitt, John Spray, Sarah Stewart-Mukhopadhyay, Timothy Swindle, Lawrence Taylor, Ross Taylor, Mark Wieczorek, Nicolle Zellner, Maria Zuber
Exploring the Bombardment History of the Moon We discuss our priorities for exploring the Moon''s bombardment history: (1) Test the idea of a massive impactor spike 3.8-4.0 billion years ago. (2) Anchor the early Earth-Moon impact flux curve by determining the age of South Pole-Aitken Basin. (3) Establish a precise absolute chronology. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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Dana Backman SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) and Planetary Science This paper consists of the intro & observatory capabilities (ch. 1) plus the planetary science (ch. 5) portions of the SOFIA Science Vision doc pub. in 2009 as an update of the scientific case for SOFIA. D. Backman produced this extract; the original doc is authored by the SOFIA Science Team. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. SOFIA / SETI Institute Download File

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John Grant

Co-Authors: Matt Golombek, Alfred McEwen, Scott Murchie, Frank Seelos, John Mustard, David Des Marais, Ken Tanaka, Gian Ori, Nicolas Mangold, Kate Fishbaugh, Steve Ruff, Dawn Sumner, Brad Jolliff, Ralph Harvey
Future Mars Landing Site Selection Activities A process for identifying candidate landing sites for future missions should be started and accompanied by creation of funding to support landing site characterization activities. NASA should provide resources to existing missions to enable these activities and consider including instruments for sit Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Smithsonian Institution Download File

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Bruce A. Campbell

Co-Authors: John A. Grant, Ted Maxwell, Jeffrey J. Plaut, Anthony Freeman
Exploring the Shallow Subsurface of Mars with Imaging Radar: Scientific Promise and Technical Rationale Global information on martian near-surface features and physical properties represents a great untapped aspect of the search for habitable zones and evidence of past climate. Imaging radar measurements can penetrate several meters of mantling material and 10’s of meters into ice. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Smithsonian Institution Download File

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Robert J. Noble

Co-Authors: Rashied Amini, Patricia M. Beauchamp, Gary L. Bennett, John R. Brophy, Bonnie J. Buratti, Joan Ervin, Yan R. Fernandez, Will Grundy, Mohammed Omair Khan, David Q. King, Jared Lang, Karen J. Meech, Alan Newhouse, Steven R. Oleson, George R. Schmidt, Thomas Spilker, John L. West
New Opportunities for Outer Solar System Science using Radioisotope Electric Propulsion This whitepaper discusses how mobility provided by radioisotope electric propulsion (REP) opens up entirely new science opportunities for robotic missions to distant primitive bodies. We also give an overview of REP technology developments and the required next steps to realize REP. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Download File

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Oleksandr Potashko Atmosphere as Sign of Life Is there a feature of presence of life on a macro-level? Could we say something about life on Neptune or on Halley’s Comet or on an exoplanet? Let’s consider that sign of life is an atmosphere. Let''s consider crustal planet. Whether planet has an atmosphere we may say that it is alive in geologi Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. SF ''Fractal'' Download File

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Cynthia Phillips

Co-Authors: D. L. Blaney, R. T. Pappalardo, H. Hussman, G. C. Collins, R. M. Mastrapa, J. F. Cooper, R. Greeley, J. B. Dalton, T. A. Hurford, E. B. Bierhaus, F. Nimmo, D. A. Williams, D. A. Senske , D. Grinspoon, R. E. Johnson, S. Kattenhorn, P. Hayne, B. Betts, W. B. McKinnon, L. M. Prockter, A. P. Showman, J. H. Shirley, K. Khurana, S. Grasby, B. G. Bills, L. Friedman, J. Castillo, C. Sotin, G. Hansen, K. Klaus, B. J. Buratti, S. W. Asmar, M. J. S. Belton, E. Heggy, L. Sklar, A. R. Hendrix, J. R. Spear, S. Ulamec, L. Bruzzone, F. Tosi, R. Jaumann, G. Strazzulla, A. Coates, J. Emery, L. Allamandola, A. Coustenis, R. W. Carlson, W. Grundy, S. D. Vance, G. Branduardi-Raymont, M. Barmatz, P. M. Beauchamp, A. D. Anbar, C. A. Raymond, K. P. Hand, E. Shock, K. Stephan, D. L. Goldsby, D. D. Blankenship, M. Choukroun, W. Moore, E. P. Turtle, T. Pierson, S. Neuer, M. Zolotov
Exploration of Europa Europa''s icy surface may hide an ocean of liquid water. We summarize the unanswered questions pertaining to Europa following the Galileo mission, and address how those questions will be answered by suggested missions such as EJSM and a lander, as well as new telescopic and laboratory measurements. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. SETI Institute Download File

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Jeffrey L. Bada

Co-Authors: Andrew D. Aubrey, Frank J. Grunthaner, Michael Hecht, Richard Quinn, Richard Mathies, Aaron Zent, John H. Chalmers
Seeking Signs of Life on Mars: In Situ Investigations as Prerequisites to Sample Return Missions We argue for deployment of increasingly sophisticated in situ techniques to definitively identify biomarkers before engaging in Mars Sample Return. We focus on “following the nitrogen,” using techniques such as micro capillary electrophoresis to identify and determine the chirality of primary amines Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Scripps Institution of Oceanography Download File

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Craig Agnor

Co-Authors: A. Barr, B. Bierhaus, D. Brain, B. Bills, W. Bottke, B. Buratti, S. Charnoz, J. Cho,A. Christou, G. Collins, J. Colwell, N. Cooper, L. Dones, M. Evans, R. French, A. Gulbis,, N. Haghighipour, D. Hamilton, C. Hansen,, A. Hendrix, D. Hurley, K. Jessup, M. Kirchoff, W. Kurth, H. Levison, M. Lewis, R. Lillis, Y. Ma, R. Malhotra, T. Michaels, M. Mickelson, W. Patterson, L. Prockter, D. Ragozzine, K. Rutherford, K. Sayanagi, P. Schenk, M. Summers, M. Tiscareno, K. Tsiganis, P. Zarka
The Exploration of Neptune and Triton Neptune and its captured moon Triton are unexplored with modern spacecraft instrumentation. Observations of these objects are urgently needed to address planet formation and the evolution of ice giant planets, icy satellites, Kuiper Belt Objects, and the solar system itself. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Queen Mary, University of London (United Kingdom) Download File

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Kimberly R. Kuhlman

Co-Authors: Alberto Behar, Jack Jones, Penelope Boston, Jeffrey Antol, Gregory Hajos, Warren Kelliher, Max Coleman, Ronald Crawford, Lynn Rothschild, Martin Buehler, Greg Bearman, Daniel W. Wilson, Christopher P. McKay
Tumbleweed: A New Paradigm for Surveying the Surface of Mars Tumbleweeds are lightweight, highly configurable and inexpensive wind-driven vehicles that could enable long-range surveys of the surface of Mars. Their analytical capabilities can be optimized for measurements for astrobiology or in situ resources over relatively large swaths of terrain. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Planetary Science Institute Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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