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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Candice Hansen

Co-Authors: A.S.Aljabri, D.Banfield, E.B.Bierhaus, M.Brown, J.E.Colwell, M.Dougherty, A.R.Hendrix, H.Hussmann, K.Khurana, D.Landau, A.McEwen, D.A.Paige, C.Paranicas, C.M.Satter, B.Schmidt, M.Showalter, L.J.Spilker, T.Spilker, J.Stansberry, N.Strange, M.Tiscareno, Steve Vance
Triton science with Argo - A Voyage through the Outer Solar System Argo is an innovative pragmatic concept for a New Frontiers 4 mission to significantly expand our knowledge of the outer Solar System. It exploits an upcoming launch window that permits a close Triton encounter during a flyby through the Neptune system, and then continues on to a scientifically-sel Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Samad A. Hayati

Co-Authors: Michelle Munk, Dick Powell, Bob Gershman, Ying Lin, Karen Buxbaum, Paul Backes, Steve Gorevan, Dave Stephenson, Dave Anderson, John Dankanich, Carl Allen, Don Pearson, Tom Rivellini, Issa Nesnas, Gary Bolotin, Charles Budney, Aron Wolf, Joseph Riedel
Strategic Technology Development for Future Mars Missions (2013-2022) This white paper focuses on enabling technologies for several candidate concepts for future Mars missions. These missions are described in MEPAG position white papers developed for the decadal survey. The technologies, their current status, and their approximate costs and schedules are described. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Michael Hecht

Co-Authors: W. Thomas Pike, Walter Goetz, Morten Bo Madsen, Janice L. Bishop, Urs Staufer, Kjartan M. Kinch, Kristoffer Leer
The microstructure of the martian surface Martian soil is a microcosm of the mineralogical history of the planet, and it exerts a primary influence on atmospheric, geological, and periglacial properties. We propose an increased emphasis on microanalysis in future Mars surface exploration. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Michael Hecht

Co-Authors: Kathryn Fishbaugh, Shane Byrne, Ken Herkenhoff, Stephen Clifford, Timothy N. Titus, Oded Aharonson
Next Steps in Mars Polar Science: In Situ Subsurface Exploration of the North Polar Layered Deposits The polar regions of Mars represent a unique environment for determining the mechanisms of martian climate change over geological time. Using terrestrial paleoclimatology methods, subsurface access to the polar layer deposits should be a high priority for future Mars exploration. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Robert Hodyss

Co-Authors: Paul D. Cooper, Reggie Hudson, Robert Carlson, Paul V. Johnson, Arthur L. Lane, Marla Moore, Louis J. Allamandola
Recommended Laboratory Studies in Support of Planetary Science: Surface Chemistry of Icy Bodies We identify several areas where an increased emphasis on laboratory activities would lead to a significant return in scientific results, based on an enhanced understanding of the fundamental surface chemistry of icy bodies. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Mark Hofstadter

Co-Authors: Don Banfield, Linda Brown, Thibault Cavalie, Imke de Pater, Scott Edgington, Leigh Fletcher, A. James Friedson, Daniel Gautier, Sam Gulkis, Mark Gurwell, Patrick Irwin, Erich Karkoschka, Jean-Pierre Lebreton, Julianne Moses, Glenn Orton, Kathy Rages, Peter Read, Adam P. Showman, Nicholas Teanby, P. Yanamandra-Fisher
The Atmospheres of the Ice Giants, Uranus and Neptune We believe many important atmospheric science questions can only be addressed by studies of the ice giants Uranus and Neptune. These questions relate to fundamental atmospheric processes that help us understand the formation, evolution, and current structure of all planets. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Mark Hofstadter

Co-Authors: David Atkinson, Kevin Baines, Shawn Brooks, Imke de Pater, Leigh Fletcher, A. James Friedson, Mark Gurwell, Matthew Hedman, Brigette Hesman, Patrick Irwin, Sanjay Limaye, Steven Miller, Robert Moeller, Julianne Moses, Neil Murphy, Glenn Orton, Robert Pappalardo, Kathy Rages, Nicole Rappaport, Christophe Sotin, Linda Spilker, Thomas Spilker, Tom Stallard, Matthew Tiscareno, Elizabeth Turtle, Daniel Wenkert
The Case for a Uranus Orbiter This paper discusses some of the fundamental science that must be done at Uranus if we are to understand our Solar System and systems discovered around other stars. We suggest a Uranus Orbiter should be launched in the next decade. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Michael Mischna

Co-Authors: Michael Smith, Rob Kursinski, Don Banfield
Atmospheric Science Research Priorities for Mars This paper addresses the exploration of the martian atmosphere, and focuses on broad atmospheric science goals that can be obtained from orbit. It presents the key questions in atmospheric science that remain unanswered, and what progress can be made towards answering them in the coming decade. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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David Oh

Co-Authors: Richard R. Hofer, Ira Katz, Jon A. Sims, Noah Z. Warner, Thomas M. Randolph, Ronald T. Reeve, and Robert C. Moeller
Single Launch Architecture for Potential Mars Sample Return Mission Using Electric Propulsion Paper describes how a single launch Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission could potentially be enabled by using of Electric Propulsion with Hall Thrusters: a well established, off-the-shelf technology commonly used on communications satellites today. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Glenn Orton

Co-Authors: Glenn Orton, Padma Yanamandra-Fisher, Leigh Fletcher, Kevin Baines, Imke de Pater, Olivier Mousis, Jean-Pierre Lebreton, Steve Miller5, Sang-Joon Kim, Makenzie Lystrup, Kunio Sayanagi, Tom Stallard,Paul Steffes
Earth-Based Observational Support for Spacecraft Exploration of Outer-Planet Atmospheres This white paper advocates continued robust Earth-based observational support for spacecraft missions, addressing in particular investigations of Giant Planet atmospheres. Recommendations include upgrades to the NASA IRTF as well as cooperative investments in large or giant telescopes. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Glenn S. Orton

Co-Authors: L. N. Fletcher, T. Stallard, K. Baines, K. M. Sayanagi, Y. Yung, S. Edgington, S. Gulkis, J. Moses, F. J. Martin-Torres, U. Dyudina, B. Marty, N. Teanby, P.G.J. Irwin, T. CavaliƩ, D.H. Atkinson, O. Mousis, A.J. Friedson, T.R. Spilker, M. Hofstadter, R. Morales-Juberias, A.P. Showman, X. Liu, P. Hartogh, M. Wong, T.R. Spilker, M.B. Lystrup, A. Coustenis, T. Greathouse, R. K. Achterberg, G.L. Bjoraker, S.S. Limaye, P. Read, D. Gautier, D.S. Choi, T. Kostiuk, D. Huestis, A.F. Nagy, M. Choukroun, I. Muller-Wodarg, P. Yanamandra-Fisher
Saturn Atmospheric Science in the Next Decade We describe the key goals for Saturn atmospheric science (from Cassini, observatories, and new missions) organized into 5 themes: composition and chemistry, weather-layer dynamics and internal structure, clouds and hazes, time-variable phenomena and coupling to the external environment. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Robert Pappalardo

Co-Authors: Michel Blanc, Emma Bunce, Michele Dougherty, Olivier Grasset, Ron Greeley, Torrence Johnson, Jean-Pierre Lebreton, David Senske, Louise Prockter
Science of the Europa Jupiter System Mission The Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) is guided by the overarching theme: the emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants, with goals to determine whether the Jupiter System harbors habitable worlds, and to characterize the processes within the Jupiter system. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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J. Edmund Riedel

Co-Authors: MiMi Aung, Paul G. Backes, David S. Bayard, David S. Berry, John R. Brophy, L. Alberto Cangahuala, Steve A. Chien, Christopher A. Grasso, Jeffery W. Levison, Tomas Martin-Mur, William M. Owen, Jr., Stephen P. Synnott
A Survey of the Technologies Necessary for the Next Decade of Small Body and Planetary Exploration Deep space reconnaissance and sample return missions will require a range of technology developments for maximum science return. These technologies include propulsion; telecommunication; remote sensing; guidance, navigation and control; sampling; onboard processors; and autonomy. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Sue Smrekar

Co-Author: Sanjay Limaye
Venus Exploration Goals, Objectives, Investigations, and Priorities This white paper describes the science priorities developed by the Venus Exploration Analysis Group, through a series of meetings with the Venus science community. The science themes for Venus are Origin and Evolution, Venus as a Terrestrial Planet, and Climate Change and the Future of Earth. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Linda J. Spilker

Co-Authors: C. J. Hansen, N. Albers, A. S. Aljabri, D. Banfield, E. B. Bierhaus, M. Brown, J. E. Colwell, C. Chavez, F. Crary, I. de Pater, M. Dougherty, C. Ferrari, G. Filacchione, R. French, M. Gordon, E. Gruen, M. Hedman, A. R. Hendrix, M. Horanyi, G. Hospodarsky, A. Ingersoll, Sasha Kempf, K. Khurana, B. Kurth, D. Landau, J. Lissauer, E. Marouf, A. McEwen, D. A. Paige, C. Paranicas, F. Postberg, N. Rappaport, H. Salo, C. M. Satter, B. Schmidt, M. Showalter, T. R. Spilker, J. Stansberry, N. Strange, M. S. Tiscareno, P. Yanamandra-Fisher
Neptune Ring Science with Argo - A Voyage through the Outer Solar System Argo, an innovative concept for a New Frontiers 4 mission, will yield significant advances in our understanding of evolutionary processes of rings and small bodies in the outer Solar System by executing a flyby through the Neptune system, then going on to a scientifically-selected KBO. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Linda Spilker

Co-Authors: Robert Pappalardo, Robert Mitchell, Michel Blanc, Robert Brown, Jeff Cuzzi, Michele Dougherty, Charles Elachi, Larry Esposito, Michael Flasar, Daniel Gautier, Tamas Gombosi, Donald Gurnett, Arvydas Kliore, Stamatios Krimigis, Jonathan Lunine, Tobias Owen, Carolyn Porco, Francois Raulin, Laurence Soderblom, Ralf Srama, Darrell Strobel, Hunter Waite, David Young
Cassini-Huygens Solstice Mission Understanding the Saturn system has been greatly enhanced by the Cassini-Huygens mission. The proposed 7-year Cassini Solstice Mission would address new questions that have arisen during the mission, and observe seasonal and temporal change in the Saturn system to prepare for future missions. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Nathan J. Strange

Co-Authors: Daniel Scheeres, Ryan Russell, Kathleen Howell, James Longuski, Victoria Coverstone, David B. Spencer, Cesar Ocampo, Belinda Marchand, Terry Alfriend, John Junkins, Daniele Mortari, John Crassidis, Landis Markley, David Folta, John Dankanich, Shyam Bhaskaran, Dennis Byrnes, Kim Reh, Martin Lo, Jon Sims, John C. Smith, Brent Buffington, Anastassios Petropoulos, Damon Landau, Fernando Abilleira, Ryan Park, Jeffrey Parker, Julie Bellerose, Stefano Campagnola, Andrew Klesh, Nitin Arora, Diane Craig Davis, Kevin Kloster, Alfred Lynam, Geoff Wawrzyniak
Astrodynamics Research and Analysis Funding Funding for astrodynamics research has been largely limited to the development and operations phases of missions. Early funding for astrodynamics research would produce new techniques prior to formulation of missions, which could lead to novel and exciting concepts. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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David R. Thompson

Co-Authors: David R. Thompson, Robert C. Anderson, Benjamin Bornstein, Nathalie A. Cabrol, Steve Chien, Tara Estlin, Terry Fong, Robert Hogan, Ralph Lorenz, Daniel Gaines, Martha S. Gilmore, Mario Parente, Liam Pedersen, Ted L. Roush, Giuseppe Marzo, David Wettergreen
Onboard Science Data Analysis: Implications for Future Missions Onboard science data analysis enables new spacecraft operational modes that improve science yield. It can relieve constraints on time, bandwidth and power, and respond automatically to events on short time scales. We examine applications to rover, aerobot, and orbital platforms. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Wesley A. Traub

Co-Authors: Charles Beichman, Ruslan Belikov, Geoff Bryden, Mark Clampin and William Danchi, Imke de Pater, Thomas Greene, Olivier Guyon, Sara Heap, John Johnson, Lisa Kaltenegger, Jeremy Kasdin, James Kasting, Douglas Lin, Jack Lissauer, Carey Lisse, Jonathan Lunine, Bruce Macintosh, Geoff Marcy, Mark Marley, Michael Meyer, Matt Mountain, Ben Oppenheimer, Glenn Orton, Marc Postman, Aki Roberge, Sara Seager, Eugene Serabyn and Christophe Sotin, Remi Soummer, Karl Stapelfeldt, John Trauger, Stephen Unwin, Michael Werner
Exoplanets and Solar System Exploration The purpose of this White Paper is to highlight areas of knowledge of our Solar System that will be important in interpreting future observations of exoplanets, especially giant exoplanets, and also how the diversity of exoplanets can inform our understanding of the Solar System. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Peter Tsou

Co-Authors: Donald E. Brownlee, Isik Kanic, Christophe Sotin, Linda J. Spilker, Nathan Strange, Joseph Vellinga
Enceladus Flyby Sample Return, LIFE (Life Investigation For Enceladus) One of the most significant discoveries made by the Cassini Mission was finding water ice particles containing organic compounds in the plume emanating from the south pole of Enceladus. Several theories for the origin of life on Earth would also apply to Enceladus. Therefore, it should be of utmos Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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