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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Saumitra Mukherjee Effect of Star-burst on Sun-Earth environment Starbursts produces extragalactic cosmic rays which initiate the Sun to develop low Planetary Indices (Kp) and low Electron flux (E-flux) condition of Sun-Earth Environment which leads to snowfall on earth and some changes in other plants of the solar system Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jawaharlal Nehru University Download File

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Mark Allen

Co-Authors: Carrie Anderson, Andrew Coates, A. James Friedson, Murthy Gudipati, Kostas Kalogerakis, Ralph Lorenz, Jonathan Lunine, Catherine Neish, Conor Nixon, Lucy Norman
Astrobiological Research Priorities for Titan Titan, the haze-enshrouded moon of Saturn, has the largest accessible inventory of organic molecules in the Solar System outside of the Earth. The prospects are high for the formation of prebiotic compounds not unlike what might have preceded the origin of life in the early history of the Earth. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Sami W. Asmar

Co-Authors: Kaare Aksnes, Roberto Ambrosini, Aseel Anabtawi, John D. Anderson, John W. Armstrong, David Atkinson, Jean-Pierre Barriot, Bruno Bertotti, Bruce G. Bills, Michael Bird, Veronique Dehant, Peter Edenhofer, F. Michael Flasar, William Folkner, Richard G. French, Hideo Hanada, Bernd Häusler, David P. Hinson, Luciano Iess, Özgür Karatekin, Arvydas J. Kliore, Alex S. Konopliv, Frank Lemoine, Ivan Linscott, Essam Marouf, Jean-Charles Marty, Koji Matsumoto, Hirotomo Noda, Kamal Oudrhiri, Meegyeong Paik, Ryan S. Park, Martin Pätzold, Robert Preston, Nicole Rappaport, Pascal Rosenblatt, Richard A. Simpson, David E. Smith, Suzanne Smrekar, Paul G. Steffes, Silvia Tellmann, Paolo Tortora, G. Leonard Tyler, Tim Van Hoolst, Michael Watkins, James G. Williams, Paul Withers, Xiaoping Wu, Donald Yeomans, Dah-Ning Yuan, Maria T. Zuber
Planetary Radio Science: Investigations of Interiors, Surfaces, Atmospheres, Rings, and Environments Scientists utilize radio links between spacecraft and Earth or between spacecraft to examine changes in the phase/frequency, and amplitude of radio signals to investigate atmospheres and ionospheres, rings, surfaces, shapes, gravitational fields, and dynamics of solar system bodies. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Kevin H. Baines

Co-Authors: Sushil Atreya, Tibor Balint, David Crisp, David Grinspoon, Jeffery L. Hall, Gary W. Hunter, Sanjay Limaye, Viktor Kerzhanovich, Paul R. Mahaffy, Christopher T. Russell, David Senske, Stuart K. Stephens, Chris R. Webster
Venus Atmospheric Explorer New Frontiers Mission Concept A multiple-platform mission to Venus that includes a long-duration, circumnavigating balloon-based element, two drop sondes, and an orbiter, is described that directly addresses fundamental science iissues of planetary formation/evolution, dynamics/circulation, chemistry, meteorology, and geology. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Tibor Balint

Co-Authors: James Cutts, Mark Bullock, James Garvin, Stephen Gorevan, Jeffery Hall, Peter Hughes, Gary Hunter, Satish Khanna, Elizabeth Kolawa, Viktor Kerzhanovich, Ethiraj Venkatapathy
Technologies for Future Venus Exploration This VEXAG community white paper covers both heritage, and key enhancing and enabling technologies, which are required for future Venus exploration missions in all three mission classes. It also argues for a targeted technology development program, including a large environmental test chamber. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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William Bruce Banerdt

Co-Authors: Bruce Banerdt, Tilman Spohn, Ulli Christensen, Veronique Dehant, Linda Elkins-Tanton, Robert Grimm, Matthias Grott, Bob Haberle, Martin Knapmeyer, Philippe Lognonné, Franck Montmessin, Yosio Nakamura, Roger Phillips, Scot Rafkin, Peter Read, Gerald Schubert, Sue Smrekar, Mike Wilson
The Rationale for a Long-Lived Geophysical Network Mission to Mars We advocate the placement of a geophysical network on Mars to investigate the deep interior using seismic, heat flow, precision tracking and electromagnetic sounding measurements. These stations should also support meteorological atmospheric boundary layer experiments. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Patricia M. Beauchamp

Co-Authors: William McKinnon, Thomas Magner, Sami Asmar, Hunter Waite, Stephen Lichten, Ethiraj Venkatapathy, Tibor Balint, Athena Coustenis, Jeffrey L. Hall, Michelle Munk, Alberto Elfes, Kim Reh, John Elliott, Jonathan Rall, Richard Barney, Tom Spilker, Thomas J. Sutliff, Craig Williams, Andy Spry, David Atkinson, Subbarao Surampudi, Nathan Strange, Robert Preston, Wayne Zimmerman, Mark Hofstadter, James Cutts, John Clarke, Kevin Baines, Mohammad Mojarradi, Eric Pencil, Jason Barnes, Conor Nixon, Maria Teresa Capria, Vladimir B. Zivkovic, Anezina Solomonidou, Carrie Anderson, Julie Castillo, Karl Mitchell, Leonid Gurvits, David A. Williams, Javier Martin-Torres, Andrew Coates, Robert West, Rosaly Lopez, Michael Wright, Linda Spilker, Jonathan Lunine, Jason Soderblom, Bill Kurth, Christophe Sotin, Olivier Mousis, Ralf Jaumann, Nicholas Teanby, Edward Sittler, Frank Sohl, George Bampasidis, Valeria Cottini, Eric Wilson, Roger Yelle, Ralph Lorenz, Sushil Atreya, Francois Raulin, Patrick Irwin, Mathieu Hirtzig, Julian Nott, Lucy Norman, Murthy Gudipati, Véronique Vuitton, Rolant Thissen, Henry Throop, Kurt Klaus, Sebastien Rodriguez, Ingo Mueller-Wodarg, James N. Head, Don Banfield, Paul Mahaffy, Robert Brown, Marina Galand, Bonnie J. Buratti , Glen Orton, Jesse Beauchamp, Samuel Gulkis, John Brophy, Timothy A. Livengood, Louise Prockter, Mark A. Gurwell, Lorenzo Bruzzone, Ronald Greeley, Paolo Tortora, Robert Pappalado, Mimi Aung, Jesus Martinez-Frias, Jani Radebaugh, Jean-Pierre Lebreton David Senske, Alfred McEwen, Dirk Schulze-Makuch, Mark Smith, Dennis Matson, Matthew S. Tiscareno, Mathieu Choukroun, Elizabeth Turtle
Technologies for Outer Planet Missions: A Companion to the Outer Planet Assessment Group (OPAG) Strategic Exploration White Paper This is the final version of a white paper which provides the OPAG recommendations for technology required to undertake outer planetary missions. The paper describes the need for an OP technology program and provides specific recommendations for NASA investments during the next decade. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Linda R. Brown

Co-Authors: Pin Chen, Brian J. Drouin, Charles E. Miller, John Pearson, Stanley P. Sander, Keeyoon Sung, Robert A. Toth, ShanShan Yu
Laboratory Spectroscopy to Support Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Composition This paper discusses the declining state of laboratory studies that are essential to support and enable remote sensing of planetary bodies. Five recommendations are given to improve this situation. None of the above. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Bonnie Buratti

Co-Authors: Eleonora Ammannito, Erik Asphaug, MiMi Aung, James Bauer, Julie Bellerose, David Blewett, William Bottke, Daniel Britt, Julie Castillo-Rogez, Tommy Grav, Eberhard Gruen, Nader Haghighipour, Doug Hamilton, James Head, Andrew Klesh, Steve Kortenkamp, Jian-Yang Li, Scott Murchie, David Nesvorny, Catherine Olkin, William Owen, Joseph Riedel, Andrew Rivkin, Daniel Scheeres, Scott S. Sheppard, Mark V. Sykes, Peter Thomas, Anne Verbiscer, Faith Vilas, Hajime Yano, Eliot Young
Small Bodies Community White Paper: The Small Satellites of the Solar System This paper identifies the top-level science issues, mission priorities, research and technology needs, and programmatic balance for the exploration of Small Satellites. This paper was organized by the Small Bodies Assessment Group. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Julie Castillo-Rogez

Co-Authors: William B. Durham, Essam Heggy, Mathieu Choukroun, Jerome Noir, Sarah T. Stewart, Steve D. Vance, Christine M. McCarthy, Martin B. Barmatz, Pamela G. Conrad
Laboratory Studies in Support of Planetary Geophysics We summarize the rationale for advocating a healthy and sustained program of laboratory research in support of the geophysical exploration of planetary bodies. We address the challenges inherent to this discipline, and we suggest recommendations for the review panel''s consideration. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Karla B. Clark Europa Jupiter System Mission The baseline EJSM architecture consists the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). Complementary instruments monitor dynamic phenomena, map the Jovian magnetosphere and its interactions with the Galilean satellites, and characterize water oceans beneat Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Pamela G. Conrad

Co-Authors: F. Scott Anderson, Robert C. Anderson, William J. Brinckerhoff, Peter Doran, Victoria E. Hamilton, Joel A. Hurowitz, Alfred S. McEwan, Douglas W. Ming , Dimitri A. Papanastassiou, Timothy D. Swindle
Geochronology and Mars Exploration: Critical Measurements for 21st Century Planetary Science We present arguments for geochronology as a high scientific priority for Mars exploration in specific and planetary science in general. We also recommend funding four specific activities toward achieving technical readiness for addressing this priority. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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J.B. Dalton

Co-Authors: J.C. Castillo, L.R. Brown, R.P. Hodyss, P.V. Johnson, M. Gudipati, R.M. Mastrapa, K. McKeegan, R.N. Clark, P.H. Schultz, A.R. Hendrix, S.T. Stewart, S. Ruff, K.P. Hand, T. Spilker
Recommended Laboratory Studies in Support of Planetary Science Planetary science in the next decade will include major spacecraft missions to inner and outer solar system targets. Interpretation of these mission observations requires knowledge of fundamental physical and chemical properties of planetary materials. Much theoretical work at present depends upon r Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Charles D., Jr. Edwards

Co-Authors: William B. Banerdt, David W. Beaty, Leslie K. Tamppari, Richard W. Zurek
Relay Orbiters for Enhancing and Enabling Mars In Situ Exploration This white paper describes the role that orbital relay telecommunications have played as an integral part of science investigation of Mars, and the importance and continuing evolution for support to future missions. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Leigh N. Fletcher

Co-Authors: G. Orton, T. Stallard, K. Baines, K. M. Sayanagi, F. J. Martin-Torres, M. Hofstadter, I. de Pater, S. Edgington, R. Morales-Juberias, T. Livengood, D. Huestis, P. Hartogh, D.H. Atkinson, J. Moses, M. Wong, U. Dyudina, A.J. Friedson, T.R. Spilker, R.T. Pappalardo, P.G.J. Irwin, N. Teanby, T. Cavalié, O. Mousis, A.P. Showman, X. Liu, M.B. Lystrup, S. Gulkis, T. Greathouse, R. K. Achterberg, G.L. Bjoraker, S.S. Limaye, P. Read, D. Gautier, D.S. Choi, T. Kostiuk, A.F. Nagy, D. Huestis, M. Choukroun, I. Muller-Wodarg, P. Yanamandra-Fisher
Jupiter Atmospheric Science in the Next Decade We outline atmospheric science goals and requirements for Jupiter in the next decade exploration (Juno, EJSM, Observatories, probes) in 5 themes: formation and evolution, weather-layer dynamics, coupling with the interior, interactions with the external environment and time-variable phenomena. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Marc Fries

Co-Authors: John Armstrong, James Ashley, Luther Beegle, Timothy Jull, Glenn Sellar
Extralunar Materials in Lunar Regolith This paper describes the scientific rationale for locating and studying extralunar material found in lunar regolith. The extreme age and lack of weathering of lunar regolith make it a natural repository for samples from a wide range of parent bodies and across a vast span of solar system history. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Jon D. Giorgini

Co-Authors: Lance A. M. Benner, Marina Brozovic, Michael W. Busch, Donald B. Campbell, Steven R. Chesley, Paul W. Chodas, Ellen Howell, Jean-Luc Margot, Andrea Milani Petr Pravec, Robert A. Preston, Maria-Eugenia Sansaturio, Daniel J. Scheeres, Michael K. Shepard, Arnold Silva, Martin A. Slade, Patrick A. Taylor, Giovanni Valsecchi, David Vokrouhlický, Donald K. Yeomans
Radar Astrometry of Small Bodies: Detection, Characterization, Trajectory Prediction, and Hazard Assessment Radar astrometry reduces trajectory uncertainties by orders of magnitude, thereby improving prediction, targeting, and impact probability estimates for small-bodies, while characterizing some at levels comparable to a spacecraft flyby. This improves resource use for ground and flight investigations. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Murthy Gudipati

Co-Authors: Michael A''Hearn, Nancy Brickhouse, John Cowan, Paul Drake, Steven Federman, Gary Ferland, Adam Frank, Wick Haxton, Eric Herbst, Michael Mumma, Farid Salama, Daniel Wolf Savin, Lucy Ziurys
Laboratory Studies for Planetary Sciences The WGLA of the AAS promotes collaboration and exchange of knowledge between astronomy and planetary sciences and the laboratory sciences (physics, chemistry, and biology). Laboratory data needs of ongoing and next generation planetary science missions are carefully evaluated and recommended. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Candice Hansen

Co-Authors: J.A. Stansberry, A.S. Aljabri, D. Banfield, E.B. Bierhaus, M. Brown, J. E. Colwell, M. Dougherty, A.R. Hendrix, K. Khurana, D. Landau, A. McEwen, D.A. Paige, C. Paranicas, C.M. Satter, B. Schmidt, M. Showalter, T. Spilker, L.J. Spilker, N. Strange, M. Tiscareno, W.M. Grundy, N. Haghighipour, K.S. Noll, E. Schaller, S. Sheppard
KBO Science with Argo - A Voyage through the Outer Solar System Argo is an innovative pragmatic concept for a New Frontiers 4 mission which exploits an upcoming launch window that permits a close Triton encounter during a flyby through the Neptune system, and then continues on to a scientifically-selected Kuiper Belt Object. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Candice Hansen

Co-Authors: A.S.Aljabri, D.Banfield, E.B.Bierhaus, M.Brown, J.E.Colwell, M.Dougherty, A.R.Hendrix, A.Ingersoll, K.Khurana, D.Landau, A.McEwen, D.A.Paige, C.Paranicas, C.M.Satter, B.Schmidt, M.Showalter, L.J.Spilker, T.Spilker, J.Stansberry, N.Strange, M.Tiscareno
Neptune Science with Argo - A Voyage through the Outer Solar System Argo is an innovative pragmatic concept for a New Frontiers 4 mission which exploits an upcoming launch window that permits a close Triton encounter during a flyby through the Neptune system, and then continues on to a scientifically-selected Kuiper Belt Object. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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Last Updated: 9 Apr 2012