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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Clive R. Neal

Co-Authors: Bruce Banerdt, Don Bogard, Bill Bottke, Jack Burns, Ben Bussey, Barbara Cohen, Greg Delory, Richard Elphic, Bill Farrell, Lisa Gaddis, Ian Garrick-Bethel, Timothy Grove, James Head III, Jennifer Heldmann, Dana Hurley, Debra Hurwitz, Bradley Jolliff, Catherine Johnson, Christian Koeberl, Georgiana Kramer, David Lawrence, Samuel J. Lawrence, Gary Lofgren, John Longhi, Tomas Magna, David McKay, David Morrison, Sarah Noble, Marc Norman, Laurence Nyquist, Dimitri Papanastassiou, Noah Petro, Carle Pieters, Jeff Plescia, Kevin Righter, Mark Robinson, Greg Schmidt, Harrison Schmitt, Peter Schultz, James Spann, Paul Spudis, Tim Stubbs, Tim Swindle, Lawrence Taylor, G. Jeffrey Taylor, S. Ross Taylor, Mark Wieczorek, Peter Worden, Maria Zuber
Why the Moon is important for Solar System Science This paper outlines the importance of the Moon for Solar System science and in its own right as a critical target for scientific investigation during the next decade of exploration. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Notre Dame Download File

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Clive R. Neal

Co-Authors: Brad Bailey, Dave Beaty, Mary Sue Bell, Mike Duke, Paul Eckert, John Gruener, Jeff Jones, Robert Kelso, David Kring, Dan Lester, Paul Neitzel, Lewis Peach, Neal Pellis, Mike Ramsey, Debra Reiss-Bubenheim, James Rice, Gerald Sanders, Kurt Sacksteder, Greg Schmidt, Charles Shearer, Kelly Snook, Jim Spann, Paul Spudis, George Tahu, G. Jeffrey Taylor, Lawrence Taylor, Jeff Volosin, Michael Wargo
The Lunar Exploration Roadmap. Exploring the Moon in the 21st Century: Themes, Goals, Objectives, Investigations, and Priorities, 2009 This paper summarizes the long term Lunar Exploration Roadmap that has been developed by the lunar community and coordinated by the Lunar Exploration Analysis Group. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Notre Dame Download File

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John F. Mustard Seeking Signs of Life on a Terrestrial Planet: An Integrated Strategy for the Next Decade of Mars Exploration We propose an integrated strategy to implement missions of high scientific priority, as recommended by the last decadal survey, while still responding to new discoveries. The proposed step-by-step approach to sample return would provide a credible path and conduct important in situ science. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Brown University Download File

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Dr. John F. Mustard Why Mars Remains a Compelling Target for Planetary Exploration Mars has been an extremely compelling exploration target. The Decadal Survey is re-evaluating the priority of different sectors of the planetary exploration program. Based on the data collected since 2002, our conclusion is that the exploration of Mars is even more compelling now than it was then. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Brown University Download File

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Scott L. Murchie

Co-Authors: Andrew S. Rivkin, Joseph Veverka, Peter C. Thomas, Nancy L. Chabot
The Scientific Rationale for Robotic Exploration of Phobos and Deimos Mars'' two moons, Phobos and Deimos, are D-type small bodies that may be remnants of the population that delivered volatiles to the inner solar system. A Discovery class mission can address key science questions at the moons, and prepare for future human exploration. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Laboratory Download File

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Saumitra Mukherjee Effect of Star-burst on Sun-Earth environment Starbursts produces extragalactic cosmic rays which initiate the Sun to develop low Planetary Indices (Kp) and low Electron flux (E-flux) condition of Sun-Earth Environment which leads to snowfall on earth and some changes in other plants of the solar system Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jawaharlal Nehru University Download File

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Yasunori Miura New lunar science and engineering with carbon cycle. New idea and technique with carbon cycle can be applied at lunar crust origin, lunar interior and lunar double construction (surfae and underground) building at the lunar base in future from new carbon-fixing cycle. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Earth & Planet. Material Sci., Yamaguchi University Download File

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Michael Mischna

Co-Authors: Michael Smith, Rob Kursinski, Don Banfield
Atmospheric Science Research Priorities for Mars This paper addresses the exploration of the martian atmosphere, and focuses on broad atmospheric science goals that can be obtained from orbit. It presents the key questions in atmospheric science that remain unanswered, and what progress can be made towards answering them in the coming decade. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Richard S. Miller

Co-Authors: M. Bonamente, S. O’Brien, W. S. Paciesas, M. Bonamente, S. O’Brien, W. S. Paciesas, C. A. Young, D. Ebbets
Lunar Occultation Observer - A Nuclear Astrophysics Mission Concept using the Moon as a Platform for Science The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) is a gamma-ray astrophysics mission concept being developed to probe the nuclear regime. Using the Moon to occult astrophysical sources as they rise and set along the lunar limb, the encoded temporal modulation will be used to image the sky and enable science. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. None of the above. University of Alabama in Huntsville Download File

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Scott Messenger

Co-Authors: Andrew Davis, George Flynn, Lindsay Keller, Allan Treiman, Meenakshi Wadhwa, Andrew Westphal
Sample Return from Primitive Asteroids and Comets This white paper makes the case for sample return from primitive asteroids and comets in the next decade to address some of the most important questions in planetary science relating to the origin and history (and particularly the origin and distribution of organics and water) of the Solar System. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Johnson Space Center Download File

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Stephen M. Merkowitz

Co-Authors: Edward Aaron, Neil Ashby, David Carrier, Douglas Currie, John J. Degnan, Simone Dell’Agnello, Giovanni Delle Monache, Jan McGarry, Thomas W. Murphy, Jr., Kenneth Nordtvedt, Robert D. Reasenberg, Slava G. Turyshev, James G. Williams, Thomas Zagwodzki
The Moon as a Test Body for General Relativity This whitepaper describes how the next generation of lunar laser ranging addresses four key gravitational science questions. In addition, we discuss the current state of retroreflector technology and describe ways in which further advances can be made in laser ranging technologies. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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William B. McKinnon

Co-Authors: S.K. Atreya, K.H. Baines, P.M. Beauchamp,J. Clarke, G.C. Collins, J.E. Connerney, C.J. Hansen, M.D. Hofstadter, T.V. Johnson, R.D. Lorenz, R.T. Pappalardo, C.B. Phillips, J. Radebaugh, P.M. Schenk, L.J. Spilker, T. Spilker, H. Throop, E.P. Turtle, D.A. Williams, T. Balint, A. Coustenis, T. Hurford, J.-P. Lebreton, D.L. Matson, M. McGrath
Exploration Strategy for the Outer Planets 2013-2022: Goals and Priorities Outer Planets Assessment Group (OPAG) recommends that the DS support 1) the JEO and ESJM flagship, 2) Cassini Solstice Mission, and 3) Technology to permit next Outer Planets flagship to Titan/Enceladus, and assess the feasibility of 4) "small flagship" mission class and 5) a set of NF candidates. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Washington University Download File

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Michael D. Max

Co-Authors: Stephen M. Clifford, Arthur H. Johnson, Jeremie Lasue
Is a Resource-Mars a Stepping-Stone to Human Exploration of the Solar System? Methane and water on Mars are the key to a resource base to support sustainable exploration of Mars and beyond Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. MDS Research, LLC Download File

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Edward R. Martinez

Co-Author: Robert V. Frampton
Thermal Protection System Sensors This paper advocates for the development of an aeroshell TPS sensor system to the benefit of all atmospheric reentry missions Agency wide. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Jonathan I. Lunine Saturn''s Titan: A strict test for life''s cosmic ubiquity In this white paper I argue that Titan provides a strict test for the Copernican hypothesis that life is a ubiquitous cosmic phenomenon. Planets with environments like Titan may be common in the cosmos, as they correspond to a roughly 1 AU orbit around M-dwarfs. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. University of Arizona Download File

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Jonathan I. Lunine

Co-Authors: A. Coustenis, P. Beauchamp, K. Reh, G. Bampasitis, L. Bruzzone, M.T. Capria, Coates, A., A.J. Friedson, D. Gautier, R. Jaumann, K.K. Klaus, J-P. Lebreton, T. Livengood, R. Lopes-Gautier, E. Lellouch, R. Lorenz, F-J. Martin-Torres, X. Moussas, C. Nixon, J. Nott, S. Rafkin, F. RaulinLISA Univ. Paris, S. Rodriguez, F. Sohl, A. Solomonidou, E.C. Sitler, J. Soderblom, R. West, M. Wright
The Science of Titan and its Future Exploration This paper describes the science rationale for the next steps beyond Cassini-Huygens of exploration of Saturn''s moon Titan. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. University of Arizona Download File

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Ralph Lorenz

Co-Authors: Terry Hurford, Bruce Bills, Frank Sohl, James Roberts, Christophe Sotin, Hauke Hussmann
The Case for a Titan Geophysical Network Mission Notes the science value of a network of small inexpensive landers focussed on Titan geophysics and that if appropriate radioisotope sources are available, this mission could be affordable under New Frontiers. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Laboratory Download File

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David J. Loftus

Co-Authors: Erin M. Tranfield, Jon C. Rask, Clara McCrosssin
The Chemical Reactivity of Lunar Dust Relevant to Human Exploration As NASA prepares to return to the Moon, a clear understanding of the chemistry of lunar dust is required to set the stage for extended duration lunar surface operations. All aspects of the unique environment of the Moon—micrometeorite bombardment, UV light exposure, solar wind radiation, solar parti Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Amy S. Lo

Co-Authors: Howard Eller, Dean Dailey, Eric Drucker, James Wehner
Secondary Payloads Using LCROSS Architecture The ESPA architecture used by the LCROSS mission enables two capable missions for the cost of one launch. This paper describes our approach for leveraging the capability of the new generation of EELVs to enable secondary planetary missions at well below the cost of an independently launched mission. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems Download File

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Sanjay S. Limaye

Co-Authors: Mark Allen, Sushil Atreya, Kevin H. Baines, Jean-Loup Bertaux, Gordon Bjoraker, Jacques Blamont, Mark Bullock, Eric Chassefiere, Gordon Chin, Curt Covey, David Grinspoon, Samuel Gulkis, Viktor Kerzhanovich, Stephen Lewis, Kevin McGouldrick, W. J. Markiewicz, Rosalyn A. Pertzborn, Christopher Rozoff, Giuseppe Piccioni, Gerald Schubert, Lawrence A. Sromovsky, Colin F. Wilson, Yuk Yung
Venus Atmosphere: Major Questions and Required Observations This paper describes the major questions about the atmosphere of Venus and the observations required to understand it. “How Does Venus atmosphere work?” A dedicated and renewed exploration effort is required to address this fundamental question. Key questions requiring new observations include: H Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Wiscosin - Madison Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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Last Updated: 9 Apr 2012