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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Lisa Pratt

Co-Authors: Carl Allen, Abby Allwood, Ariel Anbar, Sushil Atreya, Mike Carr, Dave Des Marais, Daniel Glavin, John Grant, Vicky Hamilton, Ken Herkenhoff, Vicky Hipkin, Tom McCollom, Scott McLennan, Ralph Milliken, Doug Ming, Gian Gabrielle Ori, John Parnell, Francois Poulet (Univ. Paris), Barbara Sherwood Lollar, Frances Westall, David Beaty, Joy Crisp, Chris Salvo, Charles Whetsel, Mike Wilson
Mars Astrobiology Explorer-Cacher (MAX-C): A Potential Rover Mission for 2018 This white paper describes a potential rover mission to Mars, with the name Mars Astrobiology Explorer-Cacher (MAX-C) that could be launched in 2018. The mission would conduct high-priority in situ science and make concrete steps towards the potential future return of martian samples to Earth. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Indiana University Download File

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Oleksandr Potashko Atmosphere as Sign of Life Is there a feature of presence of life on a macro-level? Could we say something about life on Neptune or on Halley’s Comet or on an exoplanet? Let’s consider that sign of life is an atmosphere. Let''s consider crustal planet. Whether planet has an atmosphere we may say that it is alive in geologi Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. SF ''Fractal'' Download File

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Andrew Pohorille

Co-Authors: Leslie Bebout, Devaki Bhaya, Rocco Mancinelli
Limits of Terrestrial Life in Space To pursue a better understanding of life in space and link it to future missions we propose a strategy aimed at determining the potential for terrestrial microbial life to adapt and evolve in space environments. This strategy involves ground-based research, small satellite missions and will culminat None of the above. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Carl Pilcher

Co-Authors: Kevin P. Hand, Patricia M. Beauchamp, David Des Marais, David Grinspoon, Karen J. Meech, Sean N. Raymond
Astrobiology Priorities for Planetary Science Flight Missions We have posited in another white paper that all of Planetary System Science can be seen through an astrobiological lens. In this paper we present priorities for flight mission investigations derived by applying that lens to the Planetary Science flight mission program. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Astrobiology Institute, NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Carl Pilcher

Co-Authors: Kevin P. Hand, Patricia M. Beauchamp, David Des Marais, David Grinspoon, Karen J. Meech, Sean N. Raymond
An Astrobiological Lens on Planetary System Science Astrobiology provides a lens through which all of planetary science and solar system exploration, as well as life on Earth, can be viewed. Astrobiology, like planetary science, is a systems-level science. In planetary science, one must understand connections be [CHARACTERS NOT ACCEPTED BEYOND THIS Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Astrobiology Institute, NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Carle M. Pieters

Co-Authors: Carlton Allen, Mahesh Anand, W. Bruce Banerdt, William Bottke, Barbara Cohen, Ian A. Crawford, Andrew Daga, Rick Elphic, Bernard Foing, Lisa R. Gaddis, James B. Garvin, Timothy L. Grove, B. Ray Hawke, Jennifer Heldmann, Dana M. Hurley, Brad Jolliff, Christian Koeberl, Clive Neal, Brian J. O’Brien, Anne Peslier, Noah Petro, Jeffery Plescia, Amalie Sinclair, Timothy J. Stubbs, Ross Taylor, Stefanie Tompkins, Allan H. Treiman,Elizabeth Turtle, Mark Wieczorek, Lionel Wilson, Aileen Yingst
Summary and Highlights of the NRC 2007 Report: The Scientific Context for the Exploration of the Moon (SCEM) Understanding processes that have occurred on the Moon provide a framework for understanding the origin and evolution of the other terrestrial planets. The SCEM science goals and priorities remain fundamentally relevant to our understanding of the solar system and central to its exploration. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Brown University Download File

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Cynthia Phillips

Co-Authors: D. L. Blaney, R. T. Pappalardo, H. Hussman, G. C. Collins, R. M. Mastrapa, J. F. Cooper, R. Greeley, J. B. Dalton, T. A. Hurford, E. B. Bierhaus, F. Nimmo, D. A. Williams, D. A. Senske , D. Grinspoon, R. E. Johnson, S. Kattenhorn, P. Hayne, B. Betts, W. B. McKinnon, L. M. Prockter, A. P. Showman, J. H. Shirley, K. Khurana, S. Grasby, B. G. Bills, L. Friedman, J. Castillo, C. Sotin, G. Hansen, K. Klaus, B. J. Buratti, S. W. Asmar, M. J. S. Belton, E. Heggy, L. Sklar, A. R. Hendrix, J. R. Spear, S. Ulamec, L. Bruzzone, F. Tosi, R. Jaumann, G. Strazzulla, A. Coates, J. Emery, L. Allamandola, A. Coustenis, R. W. Carlson, W. Grundy, S. D. Vance, G. Branduardi-Raymont, M. Barmatz, P. M. Beauchamp, A. D. Anbar, C. A. Raymond, K. P. Hand, E. Shock, K. Stephan, D. L. Goldsby, D. D. Blankenship, M. Choukroun, W. Moore, E. P. Turtle, T. Pierson, S. Neuer, M. Zolotov
Exploration of Europa Europa''s icy surface may hide an ocean of liquid water. We summarize the unanswered questions pertaining to Europa following the Galileo mission, and address how those questions will be answered by suggested missions such as EJSM and a lander, as well as new telescopic and laboratory measurements. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. SETI Institute Download File

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Robert Pappalardo

Co-Authors: Michel Blanc, Emma Bunce, Michele Dougherty, Olivier Grasset, Ron Greeley, Torrence Johnson, Jean-Pierre Lebreton, David Senske, Louise Prockter
Science of the Europa Jupiter System Mission The Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) is guided by the overarching theme: the emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants, with goals to determine whether the Jupiter System harbors habitable worlds, and to characterize the processes within the Jupiter system. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Glenn S. Orton

Co-Authors: L. N. Fletcher, T. Stallard, K. Baines, K. M. Sayanagi, Y. Yung, S. Edgington, S. Gulkis, J. Moses, F. J. Martin-Torres, U. Dyudina, B. Marty, N. Teanby, P.G.J. Irwin, T. Cavalié, D.H. Atkinson, O. Mousis, A.J. Friedson, T.R. Spilker, M. Hofstadter, R. Morales-Juberias, A.P. Showman, X. Liu, P. Hartogh, M. Wong, T.R. Spilker, M.B. Lystrup, A. Coustenis, T. Greathouse, R. K. Achterberg, G.L. Bjoraker, S.S. Limaye, P. Read, D. Gautier, D.S. Choi, T. Kostiuk, D. Huestis, A.F. Nagy, M. Choukroun, I. Muller-Wodarg, P. Yanamandra-Fisher
Saturn Atmospheric Science in the Next Decade We describe the key goals for Saturn atmospheric science (from Cassini, observatories, and new missions) organized into 5 themes: composition and chemistry, weather-layer dynamics and internal structure, clouds and hazes, time-variable phenomena and coupling to the external environment. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Glenn Orton

Co-Authors: Glenn Orton, Padma Yanamandra-Fisher, Leigh Fletcher, Kevin Baines, Imke de Pater, Olivier Mousis, Jean-Pierre Lebreton, Steve Miller5, Sang-Joon Kim, Makenzie Lystrup, Kunio Sayanagi, Tom Stallard,Paul Steffes
Earth-Based Observational Support for Spacecraft Exploration of Outer-Planet Atmospheres This white paper advocates continued robust Earth-based observational support for spacecraft missions, addressing in particular investigations of Giant Planet atmospheres. Recommendations include upgrades to the NASA IRTF as well as cooperative investments in large or giant telescopes. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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David Oh

Co-Authors: Richard R. Hofer, Ira Katz, Jon A. Sims, Noah Z. Warner, Thomas M. Randolph, Ronald T. Reeve, and Robert C. Moeller
Single Launch Architecture for Potential Mars Sample Return Mission Using Electric Propulsion Paper describes how a single launch Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission could potentially be enabled by using of Electric Propulsion with Hall Thrusters: a well established, off-the-shelf technology commonly used on communications satellites today. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Brian J. O''Brien

Co-Author: James R.Gaier
Indicative Basic Issues about Lunar Dust in the Lunar Environment Basic issues of lunar dust - including recent discoveries -so fundamental they affect a wide range of lunar research and exploration must be recognised as priorities. Four Recommendations and Outcomes are given. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Western Australia Download File

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Julian Nott Titan’s unique attraction: it is an ideal destination for humans With so many opportunities in the Solar System it may be hard to choose destinations. Titan has a one quality that sets it apart: it is uniquely suitable for humans. One reason for robotic Mars exploration is that humans will arrive in due course. An identical justification applies to exploring Titan Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Nott Technology LLC Download File

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Julian Nott

Co-Authors: Kim Reh, Jonathan Lunine, David L. Pierce, Patricia Beauchamp, Tim Colonius, R.C. Downs, Jerrold Marsden, Carl F. Braun, Don Day, Michael Arnold, Wade Allmon, Dick Bohannnon, Alberto Elfes, John Elliot, Debora Fairbrother, Jack Jones, Jeff Hall, Greg Mungas, Michael Pauken, Rob Sinclair, Luke Brooke, David Wakefield
Advanced Titan Balloon Design Concepts Numerous studies agree that Titan is of outstanding scientific interest and Montgolfiere balloons ideal for its exploration. This paper examines balloon operations, weather and steering. It suggests novel concepts that may encourage radical thinking about Titan balloon designs. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Nott Technology LLC Download File

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Michael C. Nolan

Co-Authors: Lance A. M. Benner, Marina Brozovic, Ellen S. Howell, Jean-Luc Margot
Imaging of Near-Earth Asteroids Imaging of asteroids is necessary to understand their physical structure for studies of solar system formation, impact hazard, and resources for exploration. Ground based imaging is required to study the population of asteroids. Radar imaging at Arecibo and Goldstone currently best achieve this task Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Cornell University Download File

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Michael Nolan

Co-Authors: Paul Abell, Erik Asphaug, MiMi Aung, Julie Bellerose, Mehdi Benna, Lance Benner, David Blewett, William Bottke, Daniel Britt, Donald Campbell, Humberto Campins, Clark Chapman, Andrew Cheng, Harold C. Connolly Jr., Don Davis, Richard Dissley, Gerhard Drolshagen, Dan Durda, Eugene Fahnestock, Yanga Fernandez, Michael J. Gaffey, Mark Hammergren, James Head, Carl Hergenrother, Ellen Howell, Robert Jedicke, Steve Kortenkamp, Ekkehard Kuehrt, Stephen Larson, Dante Lauretta, Larry Lebofsky, Carey Lisse, Amy Lovell, Joseph Masiero, Lucy McFadden, William Merline, Patrick Michel, Beatrice Mueller, Joseph Nuth, David O''Brien, William Owen, Joseph Riedel, Harold Reitsema, Nalin Samarasinha, Daniel Scheeres, Derek Sears, Michael Shepard, Mark Sykes, Josep M. Trigo-Rodriguez, David Trilling, Ronald Vervack, James Walker, Benjamin Weiss, Hajime Yano, Donald Yeomans, Eliot Young, Michael Zolensky
Small Bodies Community White Paper: Near-Earth Asteroids This paper identifies the top-level science issues, mission priorities, research and technology needs, and programmatic balance for the exploration of Near-Earth Objects. This paper was organized by the Small Bodies Assessment Group. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Arecibo Observatory Download File

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Robert J. Noble

Co-Authors: Rashied Amini, Patricia M. Beauchamp, Gary L. Bennett, John R. Brophy, Bonnie J. Buratti, Joan Ervin, Yan R. Fernandez, Will Grundy, Mohammed Omair Khan, David Q. King, Jared Lang, Karen J. Meech, Alan Newhouse, Steven R. Oleson, George R. Schmidt, Thomas Spilker, John L. West
New Opportunities for Outer Solar System Science using Radioisotope Electric Propulsion This whitepaper discusses how mobility provided by radioisotope electric propulsion (REP) opens up entirely new science opportunities for robotic missions to distant primitive bodies. We also give an overview of REP technology developments and the required next steps to realize REP. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Download File

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Conor A. Nixon

Co-Authors: Carrie M. Anderson, F. Michael Flasar, Christophe Sotin, J. Hunter Waite Jr., V. Malathy Devi, Olivier Mousis, Kim R. Reh, Konstantinos Kalogerakis, A. James Friedson, Henry Roe, Yuk L. Yung, Valeria Cottini, Giorgos Bampasidis, Richard K. Achterberg, Nicholas A. Teanby, Gordon L. Bjoraker, Eric H. Wilson, Tilak Hewagama, Mark A. Gurwell, Roger Yelle, Mark A. Allen, Nathan J. Strange, Linda J. Spilker, Glenn Orton, Candice J. Hansen, Jason W. Barnes, Jason M. Soderblom, Vladimir B. Zivkovic, Anezina Solomonidou, David L. Huestis, Mark A. Smith, David H. Atkinson, Patrick G. J. Irwin, Mathieu Hirtzig, Simon B. Calcutt, Timothy A. Livengood, Sandrine Vinatier, Theodor Kostiuk, Antoine Jolly, Nasser Moazzen-Ahmadi, Darrell F. Strobel, Mao-Chang Liang, Patricia M. Beauchamp, Remco de Kok, Robert Pappalardo, Imke de Pater, Véronique Vuitton, Paul N. Romani, Robert A. West, Lucy H. Norman, Mary Ann H. Smith, Kathleen Mandt, Sebastien Rodriguez, Máté Ádámkovics, Jean-Marie Flaud, Kurt K. Klaus, Michael Wong, Jean-Pierre Lebreton, Neil Bowles
Titan''s Greenhouse Effect and Climate Herein we examine the atmospheric parallels between the Earth and Titan including the possibility of dramatic climate change. In the next decade, we urge extending the duration of the Cassini mission, planning for a future mission focused on Titan’s climate and other measures. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. University of Maryland Download File

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Clive R. Neal

Co-Authors: Marek Banaszkiewicz, Bruce Banerdt, Bruce Bills, James Carpenter, Peter Chi, Ulli Christensen, Eric Clévédé, Barbara Cohen, Ian Crawford, Doug Currie, Paul Davis, Veronique Dehant, Simone Dell’Agnello, Andrew Dombard, Fred Duennebier, Linda Elkins-Tanton, Matthew Fouch, Cliff Frohlich, Jeannine Gagnepain-Beyneix, Raphael F. Garcia, Ed Garnero, Ian Garrick-Bethel, Domenico Giardini Robert Grimm, Matthias Grott, Jasper Halekas, Lon Hood, Berengere Houdou, Shaopeng Huang, Catherine Johnson, Bradley Jolliff, Katie Joy, Amir Khan, Oleg Khavroshkin, Krishan Khurana, Walter Kiefer, Naoki Kobayashi, Junji Koyama, Oleg Kuskov, Jesse Lawrence, Mathieu Lefeuvre, Lynn Lewis, John Longhi, Philippe Lognonné, Mioara Mandea, Michael Manga, Pat McGovern, David Mimoun, Antoine Mocquet, Jean-Paul Montagner, Paul Morgan, Seiichi Nagihara, Yosio Nakamura, Jürgen Oberst, Roger Phillips, Jeff Plescia, J. Todd Ratcliff, Lutz Richter, Chris Russell, Yoshifumi Saito, Gerald Schubert, Nikolai Shapiro, Charles Shearer, Hiroaki Shiraishi, Sue Smrekar, Tilman Spohn, Bob Strangeway, Eléonore Stutzmann, Satoshi Tanaka, Toshiro Tanimoto, Patrick Taylor, Ross Taylor, Junya Terazono, Mike Thorne, Nafi Toksöz, Vincent Tong, Elizabeth Turtle, Slava Turyshev, Roman Wawrzazek, Renee Weber, Jonathan Weinberg, Ben Weiss, Mark Wieczorek, James Williams, Maria Zuber
The Rationale for Deployment of a Long-Lived Geophysical Network on the Moon This paper outlines the rationale establishing a global lunar geophysical network and the authorship demonstrates the broad community support for such an endeavor, both within the USA and internationally. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Notre Dame Download File

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Clive R. Neal

Co-Authors: Charles K. Shearer, Meenakshi Wadwha, Lars Borg, Bradley Jolliff, Allan Treiman
Developing Sample Return Technology using the Earth''s Moon as a Testing Ground Lowering cost and risk through development of sample return technologies that can be used on various sample return mission styles is emphasized, as is using the Moon as a testing ground for such technologies. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. University of Notre Dame Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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