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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Athena Coustenis

Co-Authors: J. Lunine, D. Matson, K. Reh, P. Beauchamp, J.-M.Charbonnier, L. Bruzzone, M.-T. Capria, A. Coates, C. Hansen, R. Jaumann, J.-P. Lebreton, R. Lopes, R. Lorenz, I. Mueller-Wodarg, F. Raulin, E. Sittler, J. Soderblom, F. Sohl, C. Sotin, T. Spilker, N. Strange, T. Tokano, E. Turtle, H. Waite, L. Gurvits, C. Nixon, T. Livengood, J. Blamont, R. Achterberg, M. Allen, C. Anderson, D. Atkinson, T. Balint, G. Bampasidis, D. Banfield, A. Bar-Nun, J. Barnes, R. Beebe, E. Bierhaus, G. Bjoraker, D. Burr, F. Crary, J. Cui, J. Elliott, M. Flasar, A. Friedson, M. Galand, D. Gautier, M. Gurwell, J. Head, M. Hirtzig, T. Hurford, T. Johnson, K. Klaus, W. Kurth, E. Lellouch, J. Martin-Torres, K. Mitchell, X. Moussas, M. Munk, C. Neish, L. Norman, B. Noyelles, G. Orton, A. Pankine, D. Pascu , E. Pencil, S. Rafkin, T. Ray, F. Rocard, S. Rodriguez, A. Solomonidou, L. Spilker, R. West, D. Williams, E. Wilson, M. Wright, V. Zivkovic
Future in situ balloon exploration of Titan’s atmosphere and surface Many of the questions remaining to be addressed after the Cassini-Huygens mission require both remote and in situ exploration. Our understanding of the lower atmosphere, surface and interior of Titan will benefit greatly from detailed investigations by a montgolfiere, reaching a variety of locations Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Paris Observatory, France Download File

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John F. Cooper

Co-Authors: Steven J. Sturner, Chris Paranicas, Matthew E. Hill, Abigail M. Rymer, Paul D. Cooper, Dan Pascu, Robert E. Johnson, Timothy A. Cassidy, Thomas M. Orlando, Kurt D. Retherford, Nathan A. Schwadron, Ralf I. Kaiser, François Leblanc, Louis J. Lanzerotti, Claudia J. Alexander, Henry B. Garrett, Amanda R. Hendrix, Wing H. Ip
Space Weathering Impact on Solar System Surfaces and Mission Science Space weathering is the collection of physical processes acting to erode and chemically modify planetary surfaces directly exposed to space environments of planetary magnetospheres, the heliosphere, and the local interstellar environment of the solar system. Space weathering affects the physical and Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Pamela G. Conrad

Co-Authors: F. Scott Anderson, Robert C. Anderson, William J. Brinckerhoff, Peter Doran, Victoria E. Hamilton, Joel A. Hurowitz, Alfred S. McEwan, Douglas W. Ming , Dimitri A. Papanastassiou, Timothy D. Swindle
Geochronology and Mars Exploration: Critical Measurements for 21st Century Planetary Science We present arguments for geochronology as a high scientific priority for Mars exploration in specific and planetary science in general. We also recommend funding four specific activities toward achieving technical readiness for addressing this priority. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Geoffrey Collins

Co-Authors: Claudia J. Alexander, Amy C. Barr, Edward B. Bierhaus, Michael T. Bland, Veronica J. ray, Lorenzo Bruzzone, Emma Bunce, Andrew Coates, John F. Cooper, Frank Crary, Andrew J. Dombard, Gianrico Filacchione, Olivier Grasset, Gary B. Hansen, Amanda R. Hendrix, Charles A. Hibbitts, Terry A. Hurford, Hauke Hussmann, Ralf Jaumann, Ozgur Karatekin, Krishan K. Khurana, Michelle R. Kirchoff, Jean-Pierre Lebreton, Melissa A. McGrath, Jeffrey M. Moore, Robert T. Pappalardo, G. Wesley Patterson, Christina Plainaki, Louise M. Prockter, Kurt Retherford, James H. Roberts, Paul M. Schenk, David A. Senske, Adam P. Showman, Katrin Stephan, Federico Tosi, Roland J. Wagner
Ganymede science questions and future exploration This paper summarizes outstanding science questions about Ganymede and its place in the Jupiter system, and how further exploration would answer these questions. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Wheaton College, Massachusetts Download File

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Michael R. Collier

Co-Authors: Thomas E. Cravens, Mats Holmstrom, James Burch, Konrad Dennerl, Herbert Gunell, David G. Sibeck, Steven Snowden, F. Scott Porter, Ina P. Robertson, Nick Omidi, Kip Kuntz, Steven Sembay, Jennifer Carter, Andrew Read, Dimitra Koutroumpa, Massimiliano Galeazzi, Susan Lepri, K.C. Hansen, Dan McCammon, Ruth Skoug, H. Kent Hills, Timothy J. Stubbs, Pavel M. Travnicek, George Fraser, Mark Lester
Global Imaging of Solar Wind-Planetary Body Interactions using Soft X-ray Cameras We show in this white paper that, with suitable instrumentation on planetary and terrestrial spacecraft, soft X-ray emission associated with the solar wind interaction with planetary neutral atoms can map out the solar wind distribution around planets, including the locations of plasma boundaries. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Karla B. Clark Europa Jupiter System Mission The baseline EJSM architecture consists the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). Complementary instruments monitor dynamic phenomena, map the Jovian magnetosphere and its interactions with the Galilean satellites, and characterize water oceans beneat Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Vincent F. Chevrier

Co-Authors: Derek Sears, Megan Elwood Madden, Essam Heggy
Laboratory Measurements in Support of Present and Future Missions to Mars The case is made that supporting laboratory measurements and facilities should be considered an integral element of the Nation’s Mars exploration program, since they provide a meaningful interpretation of the returned data, validation of theoretical models, and calibration of instruments. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Arkansas Center for Space and Planetary Science Download File

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Andrew F. Cheng

Co-Authors: Andrew Rivkin, Patrick Michel, Carey Lisse, Kevin Walsh, Keith Noll, Darin Ragozzine, Clark Chapman, William Merline, Lance Benner, Daniel Scheeres
Binary and Multiple Systems A sizable fraction of small bodies is found in binary or multiple systems. Understanding the formation processes of such systems is critical to understanding collisional and dynamical evolution. Missions can offer enhanced science return if they target binaries or multiples. [FINAL version] Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Laboratory Download File

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Julie Castillo-Rogez

Co-Authors: William B. Durham, Essam Heggy, Mathieu Choukroun, Jerome Noir, Sarah T. Stewart, Steve D. Vance, Christine M. McCarthy, Martin B. Barmatz, Pamela G. Conrad
Laboratory Studies in Support of Planetary Geophysics We summarize the rationale for advocating a healthy and sustained program of laboratory research in support of the geophysical exploration of planetary bodies. We address the challenges inherent to this discipline, and we suggest recommendations for the review panel''s consideration. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Bruce A. Campbell

Co-Authors: John A. Grant, Ted Maxwell, Jeffrey J. Plaut, Anthony Freeman
Exploring the Shallow Subsurface of Mars with Imaging Radar: Scientific Promise and Technical Rationale Global information on martian near-surface features and physical properties represents a great untapped aspect of the search for habitable zones and evidence of past climate. Imaging radar measurements can penetrate several meters of mantling material and 10’s of meters into ice. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Smithsonian Institution Download File

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Jack Burns

Co-Authors: E. Hallman, D. Duncan, J. Darling, & J. Stocke, J. Lazio, K. Weiler, J. Hewitt, C. Carilli, R. Bradley, T. Bastian, J. Ulvestad, J. Kasper & L. Greenhill, R. MacDowall, S. Merkowitz, J. McGarry, Zagwodzki, P. Yeh, H. Thronson, S. Ne, D. Currie, T. Murphy, S. Furlanetto & A. Mesinger, A. Loeb, J. Pritchard & E. Visbal, D. Jones, G. Taylor, K. Nordtvedt, J. Bowman, J. Grunsfeld, S. Bale, B. Wandelt, H. Falcke
Science from the Moon: The NASA/NLSI Lunar University Network for Astrophysics Research (LUNAR) The Moon is a unique platform for fundamental astrophysical measurements of gravitation, the Sun, and the Universe. With the aim of providing additional perspective on the Moon as a scientific platform, this white paper describes key research projects involving astrophysics from the Moon. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Colorado Download File

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Bonnie Buratti

Co-Authors: Eleonora Ammannito, Erik Asphaug, MiMi Aung, James Bauer, Julie Bellerose, David Blewett, William Bottke, Daniel Britt, Julie Castillo-Rogez, Tommy Grav, Eberhard Gruen, Nader Haghighipour, Doug Hamilton, James Head, Andrew Klesh, Steve Kortenkamp, Jian-Yang Li, Scott Murchie, David Nesvorny, Catherine Olkin, William Owen, Joseph Riedel, Andrew Rivkin, Daniel Scheeres, Scott S. Sheppard, Mark V. Sykes, Peter Thomas, Anne Verbiscer, Faith Vilas, Hajime Yano, Eliot Young
Small Bodies Community White Paper: The Small Satellites of the Solar System This paper identifies the top-level science issues, mission priorities, research and technology needs, and programmatic balance for the exploration of Small Satellites. This paper was organized by the Small Bodies Assessment Group. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Mark A. Bullock

Co-Authors: David A. Senske, Tibor. S. Balint, Alexis Benz, Bruce A. Campbell, Eric Chassefiere, Anthony Colaprete, James A. Cutts, Lori Glaze, Stephen Gorevan, David H. Grinspoon, Jeff Hall, George L. Hashimoto, James W. Head, Gary Hunter, Natasha Johnson, Viktor V. Kerzhanovich, Walter S. Kiefer, Elizabeth A. Kolawa, Tibor Kremic, Johnny Kwok, Sanjay S. Limaye, Stephen J. Mackwell, Mikhail Y. Marov, Adriana Ocampo, Gerald Schubert, Ellen R. Stofan, Hakan Svedhem, Dimitri V. Titov, Allen H. Treiman
The Venus Science and Technology Definition Team Flagship This white paper describes the scientific goals, objectives, instruments and mission architecture and design for a Flagship class mission to Venus. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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Linda R. Brown

Co-Authors: Pin Chen, Brian J. Drouin, Charles E. Miller, John Pearson, Stanley P. Sander, Keeyoon Sung, Robert A. Toth, ShanShan Yu
Laboratory Spectroscopy to Support Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Composition This paper discusses the declining state of laboratory studies that are essential to support and enable remote sensing of planetary bodies. Five recommendations are given to improve this situation. None of the above. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Dan Britt

Co-Authors: Paul Abell, Eleonora Ammannito, Erik Asphaug, MiMi Aung, Jim Bell, Julie Bellerose, Mehdi Benna, Lance Benner, David Blewett, William Bottke, Frank Brenker, Humberto Campins, Julie Castillo-Rogez, Andrew Cheng, Clark Chapman, Harold C. Connolly Jr., Maria Cristina De Sanctis, Richard Dissley, Dan Durda, Joshua Emery, Eugene Fahnestock, Yanga Fernandez, Michael J. Gaffey, Nader Haghighipour, Mark Hammergren, Paul Hardersen, Mihaly Horanyi, Ellen Howell, Robert Jedicke, Andrew Klesh, Steve Kortenkamp, Marc Kuchner, Stephen Larson, Dante Lauretta, Larry Lebofsky, Jian-Yang Li, Amy Lovell, Franck Marchis, Joseph Masiero, Lucy McFadden, Karen Meech, William Merline, Patrick Michel, Beatrice Mueller, David Nesvorny, Michael Nolan, Joseph Nuth, David O''Brien, William Owen, Vishnu Reddy, Joseph Riedel, Andrew Rivkin, Chris Russell, Daniel Scheeres, Michael Shepard, Mark V. Sykes, Paolo Tanga, Josep M. Trigo-Rodriguez, David Trilling, Ronald Vervack, Faith Vilas, James Walker, Benjamin Weiss, Hajime Yano, Eliot Young, Michael Zolensky
Small Bodies Community White Paper: Asteroids This paper identifies the top-level science issues, mission priorities, research and technology needs, and programmatic balance for the exploration of Asteroids. This paper was organized by the Small Bodies Assessment Group. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. University of Central Florida Download File

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Sarah E. Braden

Co-Authors: Samuel J. Lawrence, Mark S. Robinson, Bradley L. Jolliff, Julie D. Stopar, Lillian R. Ostrach, Lisa R. Gaddis, Justin J. Hagerty, Steven B. Simon, B. Ray Hawke
Unexplored Areas of the Moon: Nonmare Domes Analysis of samples returned from unexplored areas of lunar volcanism such as the Gruithuisen Domes will (1) increase our knowledge of the history of the Earth-Moon system, (2) advance theories of lunar magmatic evolution and (3) provide valuable points of comparison with other terrestrial planets. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Arizona State University Download File

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William F. Bottke

Co-Authors: Carlton Allen, Mahesh Anand, Nadine Barlow, Donald Bogard, Gwen Barnes, Clark Chapman, Barbara A. Cohen, Ian A. Crawford, Andrew Daga, Luke Dones, Dean Eppler, Vera Assis Fernandes, Bernard H. Foing, Lisa R. Gaddis, Jim N. Head, Fredrick P. Horz, Brad Jolliff, Christian Koeberl, Michelle Kirchoff, David Kring, Harold F., Levison, Simone Marchi, Charles Meyer, David A. Minton, Stephen J. Mojzsis, Clive Neal, Laurence E. Nyquist, David Nesvorny, Anne Peslier, Noah Petro, Carle Pieters, Jeff Plescia, Mark Robinson, Greg Schmidt, Sen. Harrison H. Schmitt, John Spray, Sarah Stewart-Mukhopadhyay, Timothy Swindle, Lawrence Taylor, Ross Taylor, Mark Wieczorek, Nicolle Zellner, Maria Zuber
Exploring the Bombardment History of the Moon We discuss our priorities for exploring the Moon''s bombardment history: (1) Test the idea of a massive impactor spike 3.8-4.0 billion years ago. (2) Anchor the early Earth-Moon impact flux curve by determining the age of South Pole-Aitken Basin. (3) Establish a precise absolute chronology. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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Alan P. Boss

Co-Authors: Edward Young, Victoria Meadows, Nader Haghighipour
Astrobiology Research Priorities for Exoplanets We recommend that the Decadal Survey place a high priority on continued, even expanded, support of the Research & Analysis programs that fund the efforts of exoplanet theorists, laboratory workers, and observers through NASA’s and NSF''s research programs. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington Download File

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Lars Borg

Co-Authors: Carl Allen, Dave Beaty, Karen Buxbaum, Joy Crisp, Dave Des Marais, Danny Glavin, Monica Grady, Ken Herkenhoff, Richard Mattingly, Scott McLennan, Denis Moura, John Mustard, Lisa Pratt, Steve Symes, Meenakshi Wadhwa
A Consensus Vision for Mars Sample Return A consensus vision of a Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission concept is presented, reflecting the integration of multiple recent community-based planning discussions. It summarizes the current state of thought regarding the science goals that would be best addressed by samples returned from Mars. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Lawrence Livermore National Lab Download File

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Reta F. Beebe

Co-Authors: Charles Acton, Raymond Arvidson, Jim Bell, Dan Boice, Scott Bolton, Steven Bougher, William Boynton, Daniel Britt, Marc Buie, Joseph Burns, Maria Teresa Capria, Angioletta Coradini, Daniel Crichton, Peter Ford, Richard French, Lisa Gaddis, Peter Gierasch, Randy Gladstone, Mitch Gordon, Ronald Greeley, Kenneth Hansen, Jakosky, Bruce, Yasumara Kasaba, Krishan Khurana, William Kurth, Emil Law, Ralph Lorenz, Conor Nixon, Chris Paranicus, Wayne Pryor, Thomas Roatsch, Chris Russell, Gerhard Schwehm, Richard Simpson, Mark Sykes, Dave Tholen, Raymond Walker, Paul Withers, Joseph Zender
Data Management, Preservation and the Future of PDS This paper summarizes the history, evolution and current status of analysis and archiving of planetary science data. It presents goals for PDS 2010, a revised PDS, and addresses conditions needed to achieve those goals. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. New Mexico State University Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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