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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Eliot F. Young

Co-Authors: Charles Hibbitts, Joshua Emery, Amanda Hendrix, William Merline, William Grundy, Kurt Retherford
Balloon-Borne Telescopes for Planetary Science: Imaging and Photometry This white paper advocates the use of balloon-borne telescopes for diffraction-limited imaging in visible wavelengths by demonstrating their technical readiness and low cost relative to space- and ground-based facilities. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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Roger Yelle

Co-Authors: S. Horst, M. Allen, R. Amils, S. K. Atreya G. Bampasidis, A. Bar-Nun, P. Beauchamp, M. Cabane, M. Capria, R. Carlson, N. Carrasco, A. Coates, J. Cooper, M. Combes, T. Cours, H. Cottin, A. Coustenis, T. Cravens, J. Cui, R. de Kok, I. dePater, M. Dobrijevic, G. Durry, Y. Dutil, O. Dutuit, M. Fulchignoni, M. Galand, Y. Gao, D. Gautier, M. Gurwell, E. Hebrard, F. Hersant, H. Imanaka; W. Ip, R. Jaumann, A. Jolly, S. Karoly, E. Kostiuk, L.-M. Lara, P. Lavvas, S. Lebonnois, J.- P. Lebreton, M. Leese, S. Le Mou_elic, T. Livengood, R. Lopes, J. Lopez-Moreno, J. Lunine, P. Mahaffy, V. Mangano, T. McCord, R. Modolo, A. Morse, O. Mousis, I. Muller-Wodarg, A. Mura, G. Murthy C. Nixon, D. Nna-Mvondo, L. Norman, G. Ortega, G. Orton, M. Patel, A. Pavlov, C. Plainaki, P. Rannou K. Reh, M. Rengel, F. Robb, S. Rodriguez, R. Rodrigo, E. Schaller, B. Schmitt, D. Schulze-Makuch, E. Sciamma O''Brien, J. Soderblom, A. Somogyi, E. Sittler, D. Strobel, L. Spilker, T. Spilker, M. Smith, A. Steele, K. Stephan, N. Strange, C. Szopa, R. Thissen, F. Tosi, D. Toublanc, M. Trainer S. Tripathi, S. Ulamec, S. Vinatier, V. Vuitton, J.-E. Wahlund, J. H. Waite, M. Yamauchi, J. Zarnecki
Prebiotic Atmospheric Chemistry on Titan Cassini measurements reveal that organic molecules with molecular weights of hundreds of amu are formed by photochemistry in Titan''s upper atmosphere. Investigating this chemistry is important for understanding the production of biological building blocks by naturally occurring processes. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. University of Arizona Download File

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Tsun-Yee Yan Yan

Co-Authors: K. Clark, R. Rasmussen
Radiation Facts and Mitigation Strategies for the JEO Mission The challenge associated with operating a spacecraft for long periods within the radiation belts of Jupiter cannot be underestimated. To realize the promise of incredible science the risk must be identified and controlled. Given the identified steps, the design is well in hand and would allow this s Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Michael H. Wong

Co-Authors: Máté Ádámkovics, Sushil K. Atreya, Don Banfield, Jim Bell, Susan Benecchi, Gordon Bjoraker, John R. Casani, John T. Clarke, Imke de Pater, Scott G. Edgington, Leigh N. Fletcher, Richard G. French, William Grundy, Amanda R. Hendrix, Erich Karkoschka, Jian-Yang Li, Franck Marchis, Melissa A. McGrath, William J. Merline, Julianne I. Moses, Keith Noll, Glenn S. Orton, Kathy A. Rages, Kurt Retherford, Kunio Sayanagi, Nick Schneider, Eric H. Smith, Lawrence A. Sromovsky, Nathan J. Strange, Anne Verbiscer, Padmavati A. Yanamandra-Fisher
A dedicated space observatory for time-domain solar system science The specific requirements for time-domain solar system science are adequate sampling rates and campaign durations. The observatory must be spaceborne both to satisfy the time-domain requirements as well as to maintain access to the dynamically significant ultraviolet spectral range. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. University of California Berkeley / STScI Download File

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Paul Withers

Co-Authors: Jared Espley, Rob Lillis, Dave Morgan, Laila Andersson, Mathieu Barthélemy, Stephen Bougher, David Brain, Stephen Brecht, Tom Cravens, Geoff Crowley, Justin Deighan, Scott England, Jeffrey Forbes, Matt Fillingim, Jane Fox, Markus Fraenz, Brian Gilchrist, Erika Harnett, Faridah Honary, Dana Hurley, Muffarah Jahangeer, Robert Johnson, Donald Kirchner, Francois Leblanc, Mark Lester, Michael Liemohn, Jean Lilensten, Janet Luhmann, Rickard Lundin, Anthony Mannucci, Susan McKenna-Lawlor, Michael Mendillo, Erling Nielsen, Martin Pätzold, Carol Paty, Kurt Retherford, Cyril Simon, James Slavin, Bob Strangeway, Roland Thissen, Feng Tian, Olivier Witasse
The ionosphere of Mars and its importance for climate evolution The ionosphere of Mars is a key part of the boundary between Mars and the solar wind. The MAVEN mission will improve our understanding of ionospheric properties and processes, including how they affect the escape to space of atmospheric species, but other important questions will remain unanswered. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Boston University Download File

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James G. Williams

Co-Authors: James G. Williams, Slava G. Turyshev, Richard T. Baran, Kevin M. Birnbaum, Douglas Currie, William M. Folkner, Gary M. Gutt, Hideo Hanada, Hamid Hemmati, Stephen M. Merkowitz,, Kenneth L. Nordtvedt, Thomas W. Murphy, Jr., Jürgen Müller, Nicolas Rambaux, Peter J. Shelus, Ruwan Somawardhana, Robert Spero
Lunar Science and Lunar Laser Ranging Lunar Laser Ranging studies the Moon’s internal structure and properties by tracking the variations in the orientation and tidal distortion of the Moon as a function of time. Future missions to the Moon’s surface should include new laser ranging instrumentation capable of improved range accuracy. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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David A. Williams

Co-Authors: Jani Radebaugh, Rosaly M.C. Lopes, Imke de Pater, Nicholas M. Schneider, Frank Marchis, Julianne Moses, Ashley G. Davies, Jason Perry, Jeffrey S. Kargel, Laszlo P. Keszthelyi, Chris Paranicas, Alfred S. McEwen, Kandis Lea Jessup, David Goldstein, Melissa Bunte, Julie Rathbun, Melissa McGrath, Krishan Khurana, Sébastien Rodriguez, Terry A. Hurford, Amanda R. Hendrix, Michelle Kirchoff, Elizabeth Turtle
Future Io Exploration for 2013-2022 and Beyond, Part 1: Justification and Science Objectives This white paper (revised draft) summarizes the current scientific questions regarding Jupiter''s volcanic moon Io, and the scientific objectives and measurements that need to be accomplished by future exploration. (Final version with additional coauthors). Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Arizona State University Download File

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David A. Williams

Co-Authors: Jani Radebaugh, Rosaly M.C. Lopes, Imke de Pater, Nicholas M. Schneider, Frank Marchis, Julianne Moses, Ashley G. Davies, Jason Perry, Jeffrey S. Kargel, Laszlo P. Keszthelyi, Chris Paranicas, Alfred S. McEwen, Kandis Lea Jessup, David Goldstein, Melissa Bunte, Julie Rathbun, Melissa McGrath, Krishan Khurana, Sébastien Rodriguez, Terry A. Hurford, Amanda R. Hendrix, Michelle Kirchoff
Future Io Exploration for 2013-2022 and Beyond, Part 2: Recommendations for Missions This revised white paper lists our recommendations for mission concepts and instruments to accomplish the science objectives for future exploration of Jupiter''s moon Io for the decade of 2013-2022 and beyond. (Final version with additional coauthors). Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Arizona State University Download File

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Anthony Wesley

Co-Authors: Glenn Orton, Padma Yanamandra-Fisher, Leigh Fletcher, Kevin Baines, Christopher Go, Makenzie Lystrup, Olivier Mousis, Imke de Pater, Jean-Pierre Lebreton, Kunio Sayanagi, Timothy Livengood, Tom Stallard, Henrik Mellin, Nigel Bannister
Ground-Based Support for Solar-System Exploration: Continuous Coverage Visible Light Imaging of Solar System Objects from a Network of Ground-Based Observatories We propose that the needs of planetary science for event-detection and time-critical observations could be well-served by a global network of low-cost remote-controlled (or autonomous) telescopes optimized for high-resolution visible light imaging of solar system targets. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Acquerra Pty Ltd. Download File

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Hal Weaver

Co-Authors: K. J. Meech, P. Abell, E. Ammannito, E. Asphaug, M. Aung, J. Bellerose, M. J. S. Belton, M. Benna, J. Blum, F. Brenker, D. Britt, D. Brownlee, B. Buratti, H. Campins, A. Cangahuala, J. Castillo-Rogez, A. Cochran, M. Combi, H. C. Connolly, Jr., N. Dello Russo, M. De Sanctis, M. DiSanti, R. Dissly, T. Farnham, L. Feaga, P. Feldman, Y. R. Fernández, E. Gruen, N. Haghighipour, W. M. Harris, C. Hergenrother, M. Horanyi, E. Howell, W. Irvine, M. Kueppers, E. Kuehrt, S. Larson, J.-Y. Li, C. M. Lisse, A. Lovell, K. Magee-Sauer, L. A. McFadden, J. P. Morgenthaler, B. E. A. Mueller, M. Nolan, J. Nuth, W. M. Owen, P. Palumbo, W. Reach, J. Riedel, N. Samarasinha, D. Scheeres, M. Sitko, M. V. Sykes, J. M. Trigo-Rodríguez, J. Veverka, R. Vervack, H. Yano, E. Young, M. Zolensky
Small Bodies Community White Paper: Goals and Priorities for the Study of Comets in the Next Decade (2011-2020) This paper identifies the top-level science issues, mission priorities, research and technology needs, and programmatic balance for the exploration of Comets. This paper was organized by the Small Bodies Assessment Group. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Laboratory Download File

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James D. Walker

Co-Authors: Walter F. Huebner, Sidney Chocron, Walt Gray, Daniel Boice
Active Seismology of Asteroids through Impact and/or Blast Loading We have no direct data on the interior structure of primitive bodies. The interior structure of asteroids is relevant to most solar system formation and evolution theories. Seismology is the only method for determining the interior structure for a range of sizes of asteroids to address. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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J. Hunter, Jr. Waite

Co-Authors: T. Brockwell, D.T. Young, W.S. Lewis, C.P. McKay, Francois Raulin, G. Schubert
Titan Lake Probe This White Paper describes the concept for a Titan Lake Probe, which could be implemented either as an element of a TSSM-type mission or as a stand-alone New Frontiers mission. The Lake Probe could be configured either as a boat or, for increased science return, as a submersible. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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Janet A. Vertesi

Co-Authors: Robert Pappalardo, Claudia Alexander, William J. Clancey, Barbara Cohen, Paul Dourish, Jeffrey Johnson, Barbara Larsen, Kimberly Lichtenberg, Charlotte Linde, Scott Maxwell, Zara Mirmalek, Jeff Moore
Sociological Considerations for the Success of Planetary Exploration Missions Alongside scientific and technical considerations, the Planetary Science Decadal Survey should require that missions incorporate deeper consideration of the social science of spacecraft operations to maximize their missions’ scientific, technical and fiscal success. None of the above. University of California, Irvine Download File

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Ethiraj Venkatapathy

Co-Authors: Helen H. Hwang, Bernard Laub, Joseph L. Conley, James Arnold, Christine E. Szalai, Jim Tibaudo, Robert Knudsen, Andrew Chambers, David Atkinson, Sushil K. Atreva, Joseph M. Vellinga, William H. Willcockson, Janine M. Thornton, Nicholas G. Smith, Richard A. Hund, John Dec,Max L. Blosser, Michelle M. Munk, Robert Maddock, Prasun N. Desai, Walter Engelund, Stephen Sandford, David A. Gilman, Steven W. Gayle, John Kowal, Christopher B. Madden, Stan Bouslog, Brian J. Remark, Donald Curry, Scott Coughlin, Adam J. Amar, Kevin H. Baines, Tibor Balint, Bernard Bienstock, George T. Chen, James A. Cutts, Jeffery L. Hall, Samad A. Hayati, Pamela J. Hoffman, Linda Spilker, Romasso P. Rivellini, Robert Manning, Eric M. Slimko, Adam D. Steltzner, Thomas Spilker, Jeffrey Umland, Charles Kiskiras, Duane Baker, Thomas Foster, Dominic Calamito, James B. Garvin, Timothy A. Sauerwein, Sharon Seipel, Lori S. Glaze, Spencer Stolis, Mark Lippold, Francis Schwind, James Thompson, Raj Narayan, Thomas Andrews, Conley Thatcher, Edwin B. Curry, John McKinney, Robert Frampton, Todd Stever, Charley Bown, William Congdon, Jennifer Congdon, Daniel M. Empey, Joe Hartman, Dinesh Prabhu, Nancy L. Mangini, Kristina A. Skokova, Margaret M. Stackpoole, Tood White, Howard Goldstein, Melmoth Covington, Robin A. Beck, Carol W. Carroll, Charles A. Smith, Deepak Bose, Anthony Colaprete, David M. Driver, Edward Martinez, Donald T. Ellerby, Matthew J. Gasch, Aga M. Goodsell, James Reuther, Sylvia M. Johnson, Dean Kontinos, Mary Livingston, Michael J. Wright, Harry Partridge, George A. Raiche, Huy K. Tran, Kerry A. Trumble
Thermal Protection System Technologies for Enabling Future Venus Exploration This paper discusses the capability of currently available TPS and the availability of heritage carbon phenolic used on the Pioneer-Venus probes. A prime conclusion is that there are important issues regarding the availability of the TPS required for future Venus entry probes. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Ethiraj Venkatapathy

Co-Authors: James Arnold,Bernard Laub, Helen H. Hwang, Christine E. Szalai, Joseph L. Conley, Jim Tibaudo, Robert Knudsen, Andrew Chambers, David Atkinson, Sushil K. Atreva, Joseph M. Vellinga, William H. Willcockson, Janine M. Thornton, Nicholas G. Smith, Richard A. Hund, John Dec, Max L. Blosser, Michelle M. Munk, Robert Maddock, Prasun N. Desai, Walter Engelund, Stephen Sandford, David A. Gilman, Steven W. Gayle, John Kowal, Christopher B. Madden, Stan Bouslog, Brian J. Remark, Donald Curry, Scott Coughlin, Adam J. Amar, Kevin H. Baines, Tibor Balint, Bernard Bienstock, George T. Chen, James A. Cutts, Jeffery L. Hall, Samad A. Hayati, Pamela J. Hoffman, Linda Spilker, Romasso P. Rivellini, Robert Manning, Eric M. Slimko, Adam D. Steltzner, Thomas Spilker, Jeffrey Umland, Charles Kiskiras, Duane Baker, Thomas Foster, Dominic Calamito, James B. Garvin, Timothy A. Sauerwein, Sharon Seipel, Lori S. Glaze, Spencer Stolis, Mark Lippold, Francis Schwind, James Thompson, Raj Narayan, Thomas Andrews, Conley Thatcher, Edwin B. Curry, John McKinney, Robert Frampton,Todd Stever, Charley Bown, William Congdon, Jennifer Congdon, Daniel M. Empey, Joe Hartman, Dinesh Prabhu, Nancy L. Mangini, Kristina A. Skokova, Margaret M. Stackpoole, Tood White, Howard Goldstein, Melmoth Covington, Robin A. Beck, Carol W. Carroll, Charles A. Smith, Deepak Bose, Anthony Colaprete, David M. Driver, Edward Martinez, Donald T. Ellerby, Matthew J. Gasch, Aga M. Goodsell, James Reuther, Sylvia M. Johnson, Dean Kontinos, Mary Livingston, Michael J. Wright, Harry Partridge, George A. Raiche, Huy K. Tran, Kerry A. Trumble
Thermal Protection System Technologies for Enabling Future Outer Planet Missions This paper discusses the capability of heritage TPS technology used on the Galileo probe and new materials required for future outer planet probe missions. A prime conclusion is that there are important issues regarding the availability of the TPS required for Outer Planet entry probes. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Ethiraj Venkatapathy

Co-Authors: Christine E. Szalai, Bernard Laub, Helen H. Hwang, Joseph L. Conley, James Arnold, Jim Tibaudo, Robert Knudsen, Andrew Chambers, David Atkinson, Sushil K. Atreva, Joseph M. Vellinga, William H. Willcockson, Janine M. Thornton, Nicholas G. Smith, Richard A. Hund, John Dec, Max L. Blosser, Michelle M. Munk, Robert Maddock, Prasun N. Desai, Walter Engelund, Stephen Sandford, David A. Gilman, Steven W. Gayle, John Kowal, Christopher B. Madden, Stan Bouslog, Brian J. Remark, Donald Curry, Scott Coughlin, Adam J. Amar, Kevin H. Baines, Tibor Balint, Bernard Bienstock, George T. Chen, James A. Cutts, Jeffery L. Hall, Samad A. Hayati, Pamela J. Hoffman, Linda Spilker, Romasso P. Rivellini, Robert Manning, Eric M. Slimko, Adam D. Steltzner, Thomas Spilker, Jeffrey Umland, Charles Kiskiras, Duane Baker, Thomas Foster, Dominic Calamito, James B. Garvin, Timothy A. Sauerwein, Sharon Seipel, Lori S. Glaze, Spencer Stolis, Mark Lippold, Francis Schwind, James Thompson, Raj Narayan, Thomas Andrews, Conley Thatcher, Edwin B. Curry, John McKinney, Robert Frampton, Todd Stever, Charley Bown, William Congdon, Jennifer Congdon, Daniel M. Empey, Joe Hartman, Dinesh Prabhu, Nancy L. Mangini, Kristina A. Skokova, Margaret M. Stackpoole, Tood White, Howard Goldstein, Melmoth Covington, Robin A. Beck, Carol W. Carroll, Charles A. Smith, Deepak Bose, Anthony Colaprete, David M. Driver, Edward Martinez, Donald T. Ellerby, Matthew J. Gasch, Aga M. Goodsell, James Reuther, Sylvia M. Johnson, Dean Kontinos, Mary Livingston, Michael J. Wright, Harry Partridge, George A. Raiche, Huy K. Tran, Kerry A. Trumble
Thermal Protection System Technologies for Enabling Future Sample Return Missions Currently available TPS materials can meet the needs of Sample Return missions with entry velocity <13 km/s. For entry velocity >13 km/s, heritage carbon phenolic is fully capable, but potentially unavailable and currently available TPS will need to be qualified. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Ethiraj Venkatapathy

Co-Authors: Bernard Laub, Joseph L. Conley, Helen H. Hwang, James Arnold, Christine E. Szalai, Jim Tibaudo, Robert Knudsen, Andrew Chambers, David Atkinson, Sushil K. Atreva, Joseph M. Vellinga, William H. Willcockson, Janine M. Thornton, Nicholas G. Smith, Richard A. Hund, John Dec, Max L. Blosser, Michelle M. Munk, Robert Maddock, Prasun N. Desai, Walter Engelund, Stephen Sandford, David A. Gilman, Steven W. Gayle, John Kowal, Christopher B. Madden, Stan Bouslog, Brian J. Remark, Donald Curry, Scott Coughlin, Adam J. Amar, Kevin H. Baines, Tibor Balint, Bernard Bienstock, George T. Chen, James A. Cutts, Jeffery L. Hall, Samad A. Hayati, Pamela J. Hoffman, Linda Spilker, Romasso P. Rivellini, Robert Manning, Eric M. Slimko, Adam D. Steltzner, Thomas Spilker, Jeffrey Umland, Charles Kiskiras, Duane Baker, Thomas Foster, Dominic Calamito, James B. Garvin, Timothy A. Sauerwein, Sharon Seipel, Lori S. Glaze, Spencer Stolis, Mark Lippold, Francis Schwind, James Thompson, Raj Narayan, Thomas Andrews, Conley Thatcher, Edwin B. Curry, John McKinney, Robert Frampton, Todd Stever, Charley Bown, William Congdon, Jennifer Congdon, Daniel M. Empey, Joe Hartman, Dinesh Prabhu, Nancy L. Mangini, Kristina A. Skokova, Margaret M. Stackpoole, Tood White, Howard Goldstein, Melmoth Covington, Robin A. Beck, Carol W. Carroll, Charles A. Smith, Deepak Bose, Anthony Colaprete, David M. Driver, Edward Martinez, Donald T. Ellerby, Matthew J. Gasch, Aga M. Goodsell, James Reuther, Sylvia M. Johnson, Dean Kontinos, Mary Livingston, Michael J. Wright, Harry Partridge, George A. Raiche, Huy K. Tran, Kerry A. Trumble
Thermal Protection System Technologies for Enabling Future Mars/Titan Science Missions This paper describes currently available TPS technologies and identifies new technologies needed to support Mars missions in the 2013 - 2022 timeframe, drawing on past mission studies, recent Mars Technology workshop for Mars Sample Return Mission, and the Solar System Exploration road map. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos.Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Steve Vance

Co-Authors: Ariel Anbar, Donald D. Blankenship, Bonnie Buratti, Julie Castillo, Geoffrey C. Collins, James B. Dalton III, Jack Farmer, Eberhard Grun, Candice Hansen, Terry Hurford, Hauke Hussmann, Jeff Moore, Robert Pappalardo, Cynthia B. Phillips, Frank Postberg, Elizabeth Turtle, Robert Tyler
Icy Satellite Processes in the Solar System: A plurality of worlds A comprehensive strategy for Solar System exploration must identify processes common to icy worlds. Such an approach requires continued investment in discovery focused on icy satellites in the size regime 100 km and larger. We elaborate on this concept, giving specific examples and recommendations Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Peter Tsou

Co-Authors: Donald E. Brownlee, Isik Kanic, Christophe Sotin, Linda J. Spilker, Nathan Strange, Joseph Vellinga
Enceladus Flyby Sample Return, LIFE (Life Investigation For Enceladus) One of the most significant discoveries made by the Cassini Mission was finding water ice particles containing organic compounds in the plume emanating from the south pole of Enceladus. Several theories for the origin of life on Earth would also apply to Enceladus. Therefore, it should be of utmos Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Allan H. Treiman Venus Geochemistry: Progress, Prospects, and Future Missions Report and recommendation of the February 2009 workshop of the same name. Inner Planets - Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Lunar and Planetary Institute Download File

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Allan Treiman

Co-Authors: Meenakshi Wadhwa, Clive R. Neal, Charles K. Shearer, Bradley L. Jolliff, Lars E. Borg, Dimitri Papanastassiou, Malcolm J. Rutherford, Christine Floss, Andrew M. Davis, Steven Symes, Susanne Schwenzer, Mark D. Fries, Andrew Westphall, Barbara Cohen, David A. Kring
Sample Return from the Earth’s Moon This white paper makes the case that sample return from selected locations on the Moon in the coming decade will provide extraordinary advances in lunar and Solar System science. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Lunar and Planetary Institute Download File

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Allan Treiman

Co-Authors: Meenakshi Wadhwa, Charles K. Shearer Jr., Glenn J. MacPherson, James J. Papike, Gerald J. Wasserburg, Christine Floss, Malcolm J. Rutherford, George J. Flynn, Dimitri Papanastassiou, Andrew Westphal, Clive Neal, John H. Jones, Ralph P. Harvey, Susanne Schwenzer
Groundbreaking Sample Return from Mars: The Next Giant Leap in Understanding the Red Planet The purpose of this white paper is to urge consideration of a groundbreaking sample return from Mars from a previously well characterized site that requires a simple mission architecture to minimize cost and engineering risk, while gaining substantial scientific return. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Lunar and Planetary Institute Download File

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Wesley A. Traub

Co-Authors: Charles Beichman, Ruslan Belikov, Geoff Bryden, Mark Clampin and William Danchi, Imke de Pater, Thomas Greene, Olivier Guyon, Sara Heap, John Johnson, Lisa Kaltenegger, Jeremy Kasdin, James Kasting, Douglas Lin, Jack Lissauer, Carey Lisse, Jonathan Lunine, Bruce Macintosh, Geoff Marcy, Mark Marley, Michael Meyer, Matt Mountain, Ben Oppenheimer, Glenn Orton, Marc Postman, Aki Roberge, Sara Seager, Eugene Serabyn and Christophe Sotin, Remi Soummer, Karl Stapelfeldt, John Trauger, Stephen Unwin, Michael Werner
Exoplanets and Solar System Exploration The purpose of this White Paper is to highlight areas of knowledge of our Solar System that will be important in interpreting future observations of exoplanets, especially giant exoplanets, and also how the diversity of exoplanets can inform our understanding of the Solar System. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Alan Tokunaga

Co-Authors: S.J. Bus, J.T. Rayner, E.V. Tollestrup
The NASA Infrared Telescope Facility This white paper describes the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, its capabilities, and its role in current and future research in planetary astronomy. None of the above. University of Hawaii Download File

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Timothy N. Titus

Co-Authors: Thomas H. Prettyman, Timothy I. Michaels, Jeffrey Barnes, Hugh H. Kieffer, Adrian Brown, Shane Byrne, Kathryn E. Fishbaugh, Michael H. Hecht
Mars Polar Science for the Next Decade This white paper is intended to be a consensus of many of the active members of the Mars polar science community, and is the culmination of discussions held at the 3rd International Mars Polar Energy Balance and CO2 Cycle workshop (MPEB2009) held in Seattle, WA, 21-24 July 2009. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. United States Geological Survey Astrogeology Science Center Download File

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Matthew Tiscareno

Co-Authors: Nicole Albers, Todd Bradley, Shawn M. Brooks, Joseph A. Burns, Carlos Chavez, Joshua E. Colwell, Jeffrey N. Cuzzi, Imke de Pater, Luke Dones, Gianrico Filacchione, Silvia M. Giuliatti Winter, Mitchell K. Gordon, Eberhard Gruen, Douglas P. Hamilton, Matthew M. Hedman, Mihaly Horanyi, Harald Krueger, Jack J. Lissauer, Philip D. Nicholson, Robert T. Pappalardo, Frank Postberg, Mark R. Showalter, Frank Spahn, Linda J. Spilker, Joseph N. Spitale, Miodrag Sremcevic, Padma Yanamandra-Fisher, Gregory J. Black, André Brahic, Sébastien Charnoz, Richard H. Durisen, Michael W. Evans, Cecile Ferrari, Amara Graps, Sascha Kempf, Steven M. Larson, Mark C. Lewis, Essam A. Marouf, Colin J. Mitchell, Carl D. Murray, Cathy B. Olkin, Keiji Ohtsuki, Derek C. Richardson, Heikki Salo, Juergen Schmidt, David A. Seal, Ralf Srama, Glen R. Stewart, John W. Weiss
Rings Research in the Next Decade The study of planetary ring systems forms a key component of planetary science. We discuss priority activities for the next decade including full support for the Cassini Solstice Mission, a spacecraft mission to Neptune and/or Uranus, and support for Earth-based research activities. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Cornell University Download File

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David R. Thompson

Co-Authors: David R. Thompson, Robert C. Anderson, Benjamin Bornstein, Nathalie A. Cabrol, Steve Chien, Tara Estlin, Terry Fong, Robert Hogan, Ralph Lorenz, Daniel Gaines, Martha S. Gilmore, Mario Parente, Liam Pedersen, Ted L. Roush, Giuseppe Marzo, David Wettergreen
Onboard Science Data Analysis: Implications for Future Missions Onboard science data analysis enables new spacecraft operational modes that improve science yield. It can relieve constraints on time, bandwidth and power, and respond automatically to events on short time scales. We examine applications to rover, aerobot, and orbital platforms. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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James T. Struck Nobel Prize in Physics and Chemistry Could Be Awarded to Almost Anyone Who Has Done Any work In fields Including me Almost anyone with work in chemistry and physics could be awarded the Nobel Prize; me too. Many contributions in chemistry and physics go on for several pages. The work of many are not recognized when the award is given to 1 or 2 people. Award could be given to any finding, article or discovery. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. None of the above. A French American Museum of Chicago, Dinosaurs, Trees, Religion and Galaxies, Inc. Download File

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James T. Struck Some Anthropology of Humans in Space. Can Human Stability Provide Some Support for Non-Evolutionary or Religious Concepts? Are we able to Speak of a Homo-Astronomicus or a Human Group Involved in Space Travel? What Happens to Humans in Space? (ID-0135) Some anthropology of humans and space. I propose a relationship between religious artifacts and astronomical stability. I establish why calling humans in space a new species fits current species understandings and mention 2 other groups-slavery and sending objects a distance. Space effects raised. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. None of the above. A French American Museum of Chicago, Dinosaurs, Trees, Religion and Galaxies, Inc. Download File

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Tore Straume Solar Radiation Output: Reading the Record of Lunar Rocks Reconstructing solar energetic particle output by measuring signatures in lunar surface samples Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Nathan J. Strange

Co-Authors: Daniel Scheeres, Ryan Russell, Kathleen Howell, James Longuski, Victoria Coverstone, David B. Spencer, Cesar Ocampo, Belinda Marchand, Terry Alfriend, John Junkins, Daniele Mortari, John Crassidis, Landis Markley, David Folta, John Dankanich, Shyam Bhaskaran, Dennis Byrnes, Kim Reh, Martin Lo, Jon Sims, John C. Smith, Brent Buffington, Anastassios Petropoulos, Damon Landau, Fernando Abilleira, Ryan Park, Jeffrey Parker, Julie Bellerose, Stefano Campagnola, Andrew Klesh, Nitin Arora, Diane Craig Davis, Kevin Kloster, Alfred Lynam, Geoff Wawrzyniak
Astrodynamics Research and Analysis Funding Funding for astrodynamics research has been largely limited to the development and operations phases of missions. Early funding for astrodynamics research would produce new techniques prior to formulation of missions, which could lead to novel and exciting concepts. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Douglas Stetson

Co-Authors: Jim Bell, Lou Friedman
Mars Exploration 2016-2032: Rationale and Principles for a Strategic Program The Mars Exploration Program, one of the most visible and dynamic elements of NASA space science, is at a crossroads. To ensure a robust future it must embrace the related goals of life and sample return, and must begin to bridge the historical gap between robotic and human exploration. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. The Planetary Society (consultant) Download File

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Andrew Steele

Co-Authors: Amundsen H.E.F., Benning L., Blake D., Borg L., Bower D.M., Brantley S., Brinkerhoff W., Cleaves J., Coates A., Cody G., Conrad P.G., Dieing T., Fogel M., Foing B., Fries M., Fritz J., Fsicher H., Glamoclija M., Garrett M., Glotch T., Hauber E., Hoffman H., Huntsberger T., Jaumann R., Johnson C., Karunatillake S., Kish A., Kress M., Hoehler T., McCollom T., McCubbin F.M., Ming D., Monaco L., Morrill P., Ohmoto H., Paar G., Pacros A., Pullan D., Robb F., Rull F., Sarrazin P., Schmitz N., Schoonen M.A.A., Schrenk M., Shahar A., Sherwood-Lollar B., Shirey S., Siljstrom S., Sims M., Smirnov A., Starke V., Toporski J.K.W., Vago, J., Wainwright N., Weishaupt K., Westall, F., Yonse, P., Zare R.N.
Astrobiology Sample Acquisition and Return This paper outlines an Astrobiology Sample Acquisition and Return mission based on the MEPAG Mid Range Rover concept mission for Mars exploration. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Carnegie Institution of Washington Download File

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Linda J. Spilker

Co-Authors: C. J. Hansen, N. Albers, A. S. Aljabri, D. Banfield, E. B. Bierhaus, M. Brown, J. E. Colwell, C. Chavez, F. Crary, I. de Pater, M. Dougherty, C. Ferrari, G. Filacchione, R. French, M. Gordon, E. Gruen, M. Hedman, A. R. Hendrix, M. Horanyi, G. Hospodarsky, A. Ingersoll, Sasha Kempf, K. Khurana, B. Kurth, D. Landau, J. Lissauer, E. Marouf, A. McEwen, D. A. Paige, C. Paranicas, F. Postberg, N. Rappaport, H. Salo, C. M. Satter, B. Schmidt, M. Showalter, T. R. Spilker, J. Stansberry, N. Strange, M. S. Tiscareno, P. Yanamandra-Fisher
Neptune Ring Science with Argo - A Voyage through the Outer Solar System Argo, an innovative concept for a New Frontiers 4 mission, will yield significant advances in our understanding of evolutionary processes of rings and small bodies in the outer Solar System by executing a flyby through the Neptune system, then going on to a scientifically-selected KBO. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Linda Spilker

Co-Authors: Robert Pappalardo, Robert Mitchell, Michel Blanc, Robert Brown, Jeff Cuzzi, Michele Dougherty, Charles Elachi, Larry Esposito, Michael Flasar, Daniel Gautier, Tamas Gombosi, Donald Gurnett, Arvydas Kliore, Stamatios Krimigis, Jonathan Lunine, Tobias Owen, Carolyn Porco, Francois Raulin, Laurence Soderblom, Ralf Srama, Darrell Strobel, Hunter Waite, David Young
Cassini-Huygens Solstice Mission Understanding the Saturn system has been greatly enhanced by the Cassini-Huygens mission. The proposed 7-year Cassini Solstice Mission would address new questions that have arisen during the mission, and observe seasonal and temporal change in the Saturn system to prepare for future missions. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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George Sonneborn

Co-Authors: J. Lunine, R. Doyon, M. McCoughrean, M. Rieke
Study of Planetary Systems and Solar System Objects with JWST Determination of the physical and chemical properties of planetary systems is a key scientific goal of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). This white paper summarizes the mission’s capabilities in our solar system and extrasolar planetary systems. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Sue Smrekar

Co-Author: Sanjay Limaye
Venus Exploration Goals, Objectives, Investigations, and Priorities This white paper describes the science priorities developed by the Venus Exploration Analysis Group, through a series of meetings with the Venus science community. The science themes for Venus are Origin and Evolution, Venus as a Terrestrial Planet, and Climate Change and the Future of Earth. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Michael D. Smith

Co-Authors: Mark Allen, Donald Banfield, Jeffrey Barnes, R. Todd Clancy, Philip James, James Kasting, Paul Wennberg, Daniel Winterhalter, Michael Wolff, Richard Zurek
Mars Trace Gas Mission: Scientific Goals and Measurement Objectives Trace gases are a sensitive indicator of current martian activity, whether photochemical or biogeochemical. A Trace Gas Mission measuring atmospheric composition, circulation and state, and locating active sources would characterize this activity and its implications for climate and astrobiology. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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David E. Smith A budget phasing approach to Europa Jupiter System Mission Science Due to budget constraints, the proposed Europa Jupiter System Mission is unlikely to occur as planned. We propose to split EJSM into three small, more affordable and less risky missions that return science earlier (about the same time as the launch date of ELSM) and in easier to accomodate budgets. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. NASA Goddard Space Flight Cener Download File

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Mark Skidmore

Co-Authors: John Priscu, Brent Christner
Planetary Science & Astrobiology: Cold habitats for life in the Solar system The paper highlights that improved knowledge of the carbon and energy transformations necessary to support life at sub-zero temperatures is key to future planetary science and astrobiological research given ice is the most abundant phase of water in the Solar system. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Montana State University Download File

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Amalie Sinclair Lunar Light -Planetary Renewal- A Holistic Viewpoint This paper sets out some rationales for an integrated US space development platform within the UN forums . Such a platform might include for an international lunar settlement and for a related space sciences initiative into global development Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Space for Progress Download File

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Susanne P. Schwenzer

Co-Authors: O. Abramov, C. Allen, S. Clifford, J. Filiberto, D.A. Kring, J. Lasue, P.J. McGovern, H.E. Newsom, A.H. Treiman, A. Wittmann
The importance of (Noachian) impact craters as windows to the sub-surface and as potential hosts of life The paper demonstrated the research that can be done in small craters punctuating larger Noachian craters. Topics include: small craters as natural drills, impact-generated hydrothermal systems and lakes in Noachian craters, and the ecological niches created by them. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Lunar and Planetary Institute Download File

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Dirk Schulze-Makuch

Co-Authors: Francois Raulin, Cynthia Phillips, Kevin Hand, Susanne Neuer, Brad Dalton
Astrobiology Research Priorities for the Outer Solar System The outer solar system provides a rewarding assortment of planetary diversity of high interest to astrobiology. This White Paper for the 2009-2011 Planetary Science Decadal Survey evaluates the planetary bodies in the outer solar system and their value to the search for life and astrobiology. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Washington State University Download File

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Harrison H. Schmitt Observations Necessary for Useful Global Climate Models Critical differences exist between scientists who observe weather and climate and those who attempt to model nature’s complexities. The modelers believe complex mathematics and broad assumptions can forecast the future of climate, Earth’s most complex system. Long-term observation is essential. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Wisconsin-Madison Download File

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Harrison H. Schmitt Lunar Pyroclastic Deposits and the Origin of the Moon he primary difficulty in accepting the computer modeled "giant impact" hypothesis for the origin of the Moon, versus independent derivation, comes from the analysis of the non-glass components of lunar pyroclastic deposits. These prove that volatile reservoirs exist in the mantle of the Moon. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Wisconsin-Madison Download File

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Harrison H. Schmitt

Co-Authors: Mark W. Henley, Kim Kuhlman, Gerald. L. Kulcinski, John F. Santarius, Lawrence A. Taylor
Lunar Helium-3 Fusion Resource Distribution The Moon''s regolith contains vast resources of helium-3, an ideal fuel for terrestrial fusion power systems. Development of plans for private sector investment in obtaining helium-3 and its by-products requires detailed definition of that isotope''s selenographic distribution. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Wisconsin-Madison Download File

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Harrison H. Schmitt

Co-Authors: Bernard H. Foing, Mark Helper, Friedrich P. Horz, Jeff Plescia, Authur Snoke, Kris Zacny
Lunar Field Geological Exploration Geological exploration by experience and highly trained field geologists provides the foundation for interpretation of lunar samples in the context of the origin and evolution of the terrestrial planets. Future lunar exploration should fully utilize the best available field geologists. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Wisconsin-Madison Download File

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Harrison H. Schmitt

Co-Authors: Andy Daga,Jeff Plescia
Geopolitical Context of Lunar Exploration and Settlement The Moon has attracted international attention as the current focus of peaceful competition in space. This competition has long term implications for the future of liberty on Earth. If non-democratic regimes dominate exploration and settlement of the Moon, liberty will be at risk. Only the United St Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Wisconsin-Madison Download File

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Robert Schingler

Co-Authors: William Marshall, Alex MacDonald, Mark Lupisella, Brian Lewis
ROSI - Return on Science Investment A system for mission evaluation based on maximizing science None of the above. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Scott Sandford

Co-Authors: Michael A’Hearn, Louis J. Allamandola, Daniel Britt, Benton Clark, Jason P. Dworkin, George Flynn, Danny Glavin, Robert Hanel, Martha Hanner, Fred Hörz, Lindsay Keller, Scott Messenger, Nicholas Smith, Frank Stadermann, Darren Wade, Ernst Zinner, Michael E. Zolensky
The Comet Coma Rendezvous Sample Return (CCRSR) Mission Concept – The Next Step Beyond Stardust This paper describes the scientific goals and implementation design of the Comet Coma Rendezvous and Sample Return (CCRSR) mission, one of the concept study missions funded by the recent NASA DSCME Program. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Erin Lee Ryan

Co-Authors: Sarah M. Hörst, Michael P.J. Benfield, Fred Calef III, Dario Cersosimo, Valeria Cottini, Robert Citron, Katherine E. Gibson, Joel A. Hesch, Dana Ionita, Craig C. Jolley, Driss Takir, Matthew Turner, Elizabeth A. Jensen
The TRACER mission: a proposed Trojan and Centaur flyby mission This paper presents a proposed flyby mission for one Trojan and one Centaur as designed by the participants of the JPL Planetary Science Summer School. This mission meets the current New Horizons guidelines and will address fundamental questions about the history of the solar system. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. University of Minnesota Download File

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John D. Rummel Planetary Protection for Planetary Science and Exploration A precis of planetary protection policy concerns, their history, and the role of the SSB and NASA internal advisory activities in ensuring progress and appropriate implementation of the policy. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. East Carolina University Download File

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S. W. Ruff

Co-Authors: S. W. Ruff, J. B. Dalton, J. L. Bishop, M. D. Dyar, T. Glotch, W. M. Grundy, V. E. Hamilton, J. R. Johnson, F. Marchis, R. M. Mastrapa, F. M. McCubbin, R. V. Morris, H. Nekvasil, M. S. Ramsey, D. Stillman, S. T. Stewart, S. K. Sharma, A. Wang, and R. C. Wiens
Laboratory Studies in Support of Planetary Surface Composition Investigations This paper demonstrates the need to support laboratory investigations related to the surface composition of planetary bodies Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Arizona State University Download File

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Thomas Ruedas

Co-Authors: Nicholas Schmerr, Natalia Gómez Pérez¸ W. Bruce Banerdt, Constance M. Bertka, Mathieu Choukroun, Yingwei Fei, Matthew J. Fouch, Walter S. Kiefer, Philippe Lognonné, Amy C. McAdam, Andrew Steele¸ Bernhard Steinberger
Seismological investigations of Mars'' deep interior This paper explains the importance of investigating the deep interior of Mars by seismological methods. Seismometers on Mars can bring insights to questions concerning planetary structure, tectonics, mantle and core dynamics, dynamo and mantle chemistry. The technical feasibility is assessed. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington Download File

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Andrew S. Rivkin

Co-Authors: Julie C. Castillo-Rogez, Neyda M. Abreu, Erik Asphaug, Andrew F. Cheng, Beth E. Clark, Barbara A. Cohen, Pamela G. Conrad, Paul Hayne, Ellen S. Howell, Torrence V. Johnson, Georgiana Kramer, Jian-Yang Li, Larry A. Lebofsky, Lucy F. Lim, Amy J. Lovell, Dennis L. Matson, Thomas M. McCord, Lucy-Ann McFadden, William B. McKinnon, Ralph E. Milliken, William Moore, James H. Roberts, Christopher T. Russell, Britney E. Schmidt, Mark V. Sykes, Peter C. Thomas, Mikhail Zolotov
The Case for Ceres: Report to the Planetary Science Decadal Survey Committee We present recent findings about Ceres, stressing its unique nature. Outstanding remaining science questions are discussed along with recommendations for the next steps in Ceres research in the Dawn and post-Dawn era. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Laboratory Download File

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Andrew Rivkin

Co-Authors: Joshua Emery, Antonella Barucci, James F. Bell, William F. Bottke, Elisabetta Dotto, Robert Gold, Carey Lisse, Javier Licandro, Louise Prockter, Charles Hibbits, Michael Paul, Alessondra Springmann, Bin Yang
The Trojan Asteroids: Keys to Many Locks The Trojan asteroids of Jupiter lie at the crux of several of the most interesting outstanding issues regarding the formation and evolution of the Solar System. We present science questions centering on the Trojans are lay out recommendations for their future study and exploration. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Laboratory Download File

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J. Edmund Riedel

Co-Authors: MiMi Aung, Paul G. Backes, David S. Bayard, David S. Berry, John R. Brophy, L. Alberto Cangahuala, Steve A. Chien, Christopher A. Grasso, Jeffery W. Levison, Tomas Martin-Mur, William M. Owen, Jr., Stephen P. Synnott
A Survey of the Technologies Necessary for the Next Decade of Small Body and Planetary Exploration Deep space reconnaissance and sample return missions will require a range of technology developments for maximum science return. These technologies include propulsion; telecommunication; remote sensing; guidance, navigation and control; sampling; onboard processors; and autonomy. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Andreas Rathke

Co-Authors: Torsten Bondo, Roger Walker, Andrew Willig, Dario Izzo, Mark Ayre
Preliminary Design of an Advanced Mission to Pluto A technology assessment and feasibility study is being performed within the ESA Advanced Concepts Team on sending a small-to-medium (700-900 kg) Nuclear Electric Propulsion spacecraft into orbit around Pluto with a mission launch in 2016 using existing or emerging space technology. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. ESA/ESTEC Advanced Concepts Team, Keplerlaan 1 2200 AZ, Nordwijk ZH, The Netherlands Download File

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Andreas Rathke Testing for the Pioneer Anomaly on a Pluto Exploration Mission An overview of the phenomenon, commonly dubbed the Pioneer anomaly, is given and the possibility for an experimental test of the anomaly as a secondary goal of an upcoming space mission is discussed using a putative Pluto Orbiter Probe as a paradigm. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. ESA/ESTEC Advanced Concepts Team, Keplerlaan 1 2200 AZ, Nordwijk ZH, The Netherlands Download File

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Scot Rafkin

Co-Authors: Robert. M. Haberle, Don Banfield, Jeff. Barnes
The Value of Landed Meteorological Investigations on Mars: The Next Advance for Climate Science Major advances in the understanding of the present and past Mars climate system are most likely to be accomplished by in situ meteorological surface measurements operating from both a network configuration and individual stations. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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Lisa Pratt

Co-Authors: Carl Allen, Abby Allwood, Ariel Anbar, Sushil Atreya, Mike Carr, Dave Des Marais, Daniel Glavin, John Grant, Vicky Hamilton, Ken Herkenhoff, Vicky Hipkin, Tom McCollom, Scott McLennan, Ralph Milliken, Doug Ming, Gian Gabrielle Ori, John Parnell, Francois Poulet (Univ. Paris), Barbara Sherwood Lollar, Frances Westall, David Beaty, Joy Crisp, Chris Salvo, Charles Whetsel, Mike Wilson
Mars Astrobiology Explorer-Cacher (MAX-C): A Potential Rover Mission for 2018 This white paper describes a potential rover mission to Mars, with the name Mars Astrobiology Explorer-Cacher (MAX-C) that could be launched in 2018. The mission would conduct high-priority in situ science and make concrete steps towards the potential future return of martian samples to Earth. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Indiana University Download File

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Oleksandr Potashko Atmosphere as Sign of Life Is there a feature of presence of life on a macro-level? Could we say something about life on Neptune or on Halley’s Comet or on an exoplanet? Let’s consider that sign of life is an atmosphere. Let''s consider crustal planet. Whether planet has an atmosphere we may say that it is alive in geologi Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. SF ''Fractal'' Download File

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Andrew Pohorille

Co-Authors: Leslie Bebout, Devaki Bhaya, Rocco Mancinelli
Limits of Terrestrial Life in Space To pursue a better understanding of life in space and link it to future missions we propose a strategy aimed at determining the potential for terrestrial microbial life to adapt and evolve in space environments. This strategy involves ground-based research, small satellite missions and will culminat None of the above. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Carl Pilcher

Co-Authors: Kevin P. Hand, Patricia M. Beauchamp, David Des Marais, David Grinspoon, Karen J. Meech, Sean N. Raymond
Astrobiology Priorities for Planetary Science Flight Missions We have posited in another white paper that all of Planetary System Science can be seen through an astrobiological lens. In this paper we present priorities for flight mission investigations derived by applying that lens to the Planetary Science flight mission program. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Astrobiology Institute, NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Carl Pilcher

Co-Authors: Kevin P. Hand, Patricia M. Beauchamp, David Des Marais, David Grinspoon, Karen J. Meech, Sean N. Raymond
An Astrobiological Lens on Planetary System Science Astrobiology provides a lens through which all of planetary science and solar system exploration, as well as life on Earth, can be viewed. Astrobiology, like planetary science, is a systems-level science. In planetary science, one must understand connections be [CHARACTERS NOT ACCEPTED BEYOND THIS Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Astrobiology Institute, NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Carle M. Pieters

Co-Authors: Carlton Allen, Mahesh Anand, W. Bruce Banerdt, William Bottke, Barbara Cohen, Ian A. Crawford, Andrew Daga, Rick Elphic, Bernard Foing, Lisa R. Gaddis, James B. Garvin, Timothy L. Grove, B. Ray Hawke, Jennifer Heldmann, Dana M. Hurley, Brad Jolliff, Christian Koeberl, Clive Neal, Brian J. O’Brien, Anne Peslier, Noah Petro, Jeffery Plescia, Amalie Sinclair, Timothy J. Stubbs, Ross Taylor, Stefanie Tompkins, Allan H. Treiman,Elizabeth Turtle, Mark Wieczorek, Lionel Wilson, Aileen Yingst
Summary and Highlights of the NRC 2007 Report: The Scientific Context for the Exploration of the Moon (SCEM) Understanding processes that have occurred on the Moon provide a framework for understanding the origin and evolution of the other terrestrial planets. The SCEM science goals and priorities remain fundamentally relevant to our understanding of the solar system and central to its exploration. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Brown University Download File

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Cynthia Phillips

Co-Authors: D. L. Blaney, R. T. Pappalardo, H. Hussman, G. C. Collins, R. M. Mastrapa, J. F. Cooper, R. Greeley, J. B. Dalton, T. A. Hurford, E. B. Bierhaus, F. Nimmo, D. A. Williams, D. A. Senske , D. Grinspoon, R. E. Johnson, S. Kattenhorn, P. Hayne, B. Betts, W. B. McKinnon, L. M. Prockter, A. P. Showman, J. H. Shirley, K. Khurana, S. Grasby, B. G. Bills, L. Friedman, J. Castillo, C. Sotin, G. Hansen, K. Klaus, B. J. Buratti, S. W. Asmar, M. J. S. Belton, E. Heggy, L. Sklar, A. R. Hendrix, J. R. Spear, S. Ulamec, L. Bruzzone, F. Tosi, R. Jaumann, G. Strazzulla, A. Coates, J. Emery, L. Allamandola, A. Coustenis, R. W. Carlson, W. Grundy, S. D. Vance, G. Branduardi-Raymont, M. Barmatz, P. M. Beauchamp, A. D. Anbar, C. A. Raymond, K. P. Hand, E. Shock, K. Stephan, D. L. Goldsby, D. D. Blankenship, M. Choukroun, W. Moore, E. P. Turtle, T. Pierson, S. Neuer, M. Zolotov
Exploration of Europa Europa''s icy surface may hide an ocean of liquid water. We summarize the unanswered questions pertaining to Europa following the Galileo mission, and address how those questions will be answered by suggested missions such as EJSM and a lander, as well as new telescopic and laboratory measurements. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. SETI Institute Download File

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Robert Pappalardo

Co-Authors: Michel Blanc, Emma Bunce, Michele Dougherty, Olivier Grasset, Ron Greeley, Torrence Johnson, Jean-Pierre Lebreton, David Senske, Louise Prockter
Science of the Europa Jupiter System Mission The Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) is guided by the overarching theme: the emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants, with goals to determine whether the Jupiter System harbors habitable worlds, and to characterize the processes within the Jupiter system. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Glenn S. Orton

Co-Authors: L. N. Fletcher, T. Stallard, K. Baines, K. M. Sayanagi, Y. Yung, S. Edgington, S. Gulkis, J. Moses, F. J. Martin-Torres, U. Dyudina, B. Marty, N. Teanby, P.G.J. Irwin, T. Cavalié, D.H. Atkinson, O. Mousis, A.J. Friedson, T.R. Spilker, M. Hofstadter, R. Morales-Juberias, A.P. Showman, X. Liu, P. Hartogh, M. Wong, T.R. Spilker, M.B. Lystrup, A. Coustenis, T. Greathouse, R. K. Achterberg, G.L. Bjoraker, S.S. Limaye, P. Read, D. Gautier, D.S. Choi, T. Kostiuk, D. Huestis, A.F. Nagy, M. Choukroun, I. Muller-Wodarg, P. Yanamandra-Fisher
Saturn Atmospheric Science in the Next Decade We describe the key goals for Saturn atmospheric science (from Cassini, observatories, and new missions) organized into 5 themes: composition and chemistry, weather-layer dynamics and internal structure, clouds and hazes, time-variable phenomena and coupling to the external environment. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Glenn Orton

Co-Authors: Glenn Orton, Padma Yanamandra-Fisher, Leigh Fletcher, Kevin Baines, Imke de Pater, Olivier Mousis, Jean-Pierre Lebreton, Steve Miller5, Sang-Joon Kim, Makenzie Lystrup, Kunio Sayanagi, Tom Stallard,Paul Steffes
Earth-Based Observational Support for Spacecraft Exploration of Outer-Planet Atmospheres This white paper advocates continued robust Earth-based observational support for spacecraft missions, addressing in particular investigations of Giant Planet atmospheres. Recommendations include upgrades to the NASA IRTF as well as cooperative investments in large or giant telescopes. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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David Oh

Co-Authors: Richard R. Hofer, Ira Katz, Jon A. Sims, Noah Z. Warner, Thomas M. Randolph, Ronald T. Reeve, and Robert C. Moeller
Single Launch Architecture for Potential Mars Sample Return Mission Using Electric Propulsion Paper describes how a single launch Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission could potentially be enabled by using of Electric Propulsion with Hall Thrusters: a well established, off-the-shelf technology commonly used on communications satellites today. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Brian J. O''Brien

Co-Author: James R.Gaier
Indicative Basic Issues about Lunar Dust in the Lunar Environment Basic issues of lunar dust - including recent discoveries -so fundamental they affect a wide range of lunar research and exploration must be recognised as priorities. Four Recommendations and Outcomes are given. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Western Australia Download File

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Julian Nott Titan’s unique attraction: it is an ideal destination for humans With so many opportunities in the Solar System it may be hard to choose destinations. Titan has a one quality that sets it apart: it is uniquely suitable for humans. One reason for robotic Mars exploration is that humans will arrive in due course. An identical justification applies to exploring Titan Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Nott Technology LLC Download File

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Julian Nott

Co-Authors: Kim Reh, Jonathan Lunine, David L. Pierce, Patricia Beauchamp, Tim Colonius, R.C. Downs, Jerrold Marsden, Carl F. Braun, Don Day, Michael Arnold, Wade Allmon, Dick Bohannnon, Alberto Elfes, John Elliot, Debora Fairbrother, Jack Jones, Jeff Hall, Greg Mungas, Michael Pauken, Rob Sinclair, Luke Brooke, David Wakefield
Advanced Titan Balloon Design Concepts Numerous studies agree that Titan is of outstanding scientific interest and Montgolfiere balloons ideal for its exploration. This paper examines balloon operations, weather and steering. It suggests novel concepts that may encourage radical thinking about Titan balloon designs. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Nott Technology LLC Download File

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Michael C. Nolan

Co-Authors: Lance A. M. Benner, Marina Brozovic, Ellen S. Howell, Jean-Luc Margot
Imaging of Near-Earth Asteroids Imaging of asteroids is necessary to understand their physical structure for studies of solar system formation, impact hazard, and resources for exploration. Ground based imaging is required to study the population of asteroids. Radar imaging at Arecibo and Goldstone currently best achieve this task Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Cornell University Download File

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Michael Nolan

Co-Authors: Paul Abell, Erik Asphaug, MiMi Aung, Julie Bellerose, Mehdi Benna, Lance Benner, David Blewett, William Bottke, Daniel Britt, Donald Campbell, Humberto Campins, Clark Chapman, Andrew Cheng, Harold C. Connolly Jr., Don Davis, Richard Dissley, Gerhard Drolshagen, Dan Durda, Eugene Fahnestock, Yanga Fernandez, Michael J. Gaffey, Mark Hammergren, James Head, Carl Hergenrother, Ellen Howell, Robert Jedicke, Steve Kortenkamp, Ekkehard Kuehrt, Stephen Larson, Dante Lauretta, Larry Lebofsky, Carey Lisse, Amy Lovell, Joseph Masiero, Lucy McFadden, William Merline, Patrick Michel, Beatrice Mueller, Joseph Nuth, David O''Brien, William Owen, Joseph Riedel, Harold Reitsema, Nalin Samarasinha, Daniel Scheeres, Derek Sears, Michael Shepard, Mark Sykes, Josep M. Trigo-Rodriguez, David Trilling, Ronald Vervack, James Walker, Benjamin Weiss, Hajime Yano, Donald Yeomans, Eliot Young, Michael Zolensky
Small Bodies Community White Paper: Near-Earth Asteroids This paper identifies the top-level science issues, mission priorities, research and technology needs, and programmatic balance for the exploration of Near-Earth Objects. This paper was organized by the Small Bodies Assessment Group. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Arecibo Observatory Download File

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Robert J. Noble

Co-Authors: Rashied Amini, Patricia M. Beauchamp, Gary L. Bennett, John R. Brophy, Bonnie J. Buratti, Joan Ervin, Yan R. Fernandez, Will Grundy, Mohammed Omair Khan, David Q. King, Jared Lang, Karen J. Meech, Alan Newhouse, Steven R. Oleson, George R. Schmidt, Thomas Spilker, John L. West
New Opportunities for Outer Solar System Science using Radioisotope Electric Propulsion This whitepaper discusses how mobility provided by radioisotope electric propulsion (REP) opens up entirely new science opportunities for robotic missions to distant primitive bodies. We also give an overview of REP technology developments and the required next steps to realize REP. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Download File

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Conor A. Nixon

Co-Authors: Carrie M. Anderson, F. Michael Flasar, Christophe Sotin, J. Hunter Waite Jr., V. Malathy Devi, Olivier Mousis, Kim R. Reh, Konstantinos Kalogerakis, A. James Friedson, Henry Roe, Yuk L. Yung, Valeria Cottini, Giorgos Bampasidis, Richard K. Achterberg, Nicholas A. Teanby, Gordon L. Bjoraker, Eric H. Wilson, Tilak Hewagama, Mark A. Gurwell, Roger Yelle, Mark A. Allen, Nathan J. Strange, Linda J. Spilker, Glenn Orton, Candice J. Hansen, Jason W. Barnes, Jason M. Soderblom, Vladimir B. Zivkovic, Anezina Solomonidou, David L. Huestis, Mark A. Smith, David H. Atkinson, Patrick G. J. Irwin, Mathieu Hirtzig, Simon B. Calcutt, Timothy A. Livengood, Sandrine Vinatier, Theodor Kostiuk, Antoine Jolly, Nasser Moazzen-Ahmadi, Darrell F. Strobel, Mao-Chang Liang, Patricia M. Beauchamp, Remco de Kok, Robert Pappalardo, Imke de Pater, Véronique Vuitton, Paul N. Romani, Robert A. West, Lucy H. Norman, Mary Ann H. Smith, Kathleen Mandt, Sebastien Rodriguez, Máté Ádámkovics, Jean-Marie Flaud, Kurt K. Klaus, Michael Wong, Jean-Pierre Lebreton, Neil Bowles
Titan''s Greenhouse Effect and Climate Herein we examine the atmospheric parallels between the Earth and Titan including the possibility of dramatic climate change. In the next decade, we urge extending the duration of the Cassini mission, planning for a future mission focused on Titan’s climate and other measures. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. University of Maryland Download File

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Clive R. Neal

Co-Authors: Marek Banaszkiewicz, Bruce Banerdt, Bruce Bills, James Carpenter, Peter Chi, Ulli Christensen, Eric Clévédé, Barbara Cohen, Ian Crawford, Doug Currie, Paul Davis, Veronique Dehant, Simone Dell’Agnello, Andrew Dombard, Fred Duennebier, Linda Elkins-Tanton, Matthew Fouch, Cliff Frohlich, Jeannine Gagnepain-Beyneix, Raphael F. Garcia, Ed Garnero, Ian Garrick-Bethel, Domenico Giardini Robert Grimm, Matthias Grott, Jasper Halekas, Lon Hood, Berengere Houdou, Shaopeng Huang, Catherine Johnson, Bradley Jolliff, Katie Joy, Amir Khan, Oleg Khavroshkin, Krishan Khurana, Walter Kiefer, Naoki Kobayashi, Junji Koyama, Oleg Kuskov, Jesse Lawrence, Mathieu Lefeuvre, Lynn Lewis, John Longhi, Philippe Lognonné, Mioara Mandea, Michael Manga, Pat McGovern, David Mimoun, Antoine Mocquet, Jean-Paul Montagner, Paul Morgan, Seiichi Nagihara, Yosio Nakamura, Jürgen Oberst, Roger Phillips, Jeff Plescia, J. Todd Ratcliff, Lutz Richter, Chris Russell, Yoshifumi Saito, Gerald Schubert, Nikolai Shapiro, Charles Shearer, Hiroaki Shiraishi, Sue Smrekar, Tilman Spohn, Bob Strangeway, Eléonore Stutzmann, Satoshi Tanaka, Toshiro Tanimoto, Patrick Taylor, Ross Taylor, Junya Terazono, Mike Thorne, Nafi Toksöz, Vincent Tong, Elizabeth Turtle, Slava Turyshev, Roman Wawrzazek, Renee Weber, Jonathan Weinberg, Ben Weiss, Mark Wieczorek, James Williams, Maria Zuber
The Rationale for Deployment of a Long-Lived Geophysical Network on the Moon This paper outlines the rationale establishing a global lunar geophysical network and the authorship demonstrates the broad community support for such an endeavor, both within the USA and internationally. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Notre Dame Download File

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Clive R. Neal

Co-Authors: Charles K. Shearer, Meenakshi Wadwha, Lars Borg, Bradley Jolliff, Allan Treiman
Developing Sample Return Technology using the Earth''s Moon as a Testing Ground Lowering cost and risk through development of sample return technologies that can be used on various sample return mission styles is emphasized, as is using the Moon as a testing ground for such technologies. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. University of Notre Dame Download File

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Clive R. Neal

Co-Authors: Bruce Banerdt, Don Bogard, Bill Bottke, Jack Burns, Ben Bussey, Barbara Cohen, Greg Delory, Richard Elphic, Bill Farrell, Lisa Gaddis, Ian Garrick-Bethel, Timothy Grove, James Head III, Jennifer Heldmann, Dana Hurley, Debra Hurwitz, Bradley Jolliff, Catherine Johnson, Christian Koeberl, Georgiana Kramer, David Lawrence, Samuel J. Lawrence, Gary Lofgren, John Longhi, Tomas Magna, David McKay, David Morrison, Sarah Noble, Marc Norman, Laurence Nyquist, Dimitri Papanastassiou, Noah Petro, Carle Pieters, Jeff Plescia, Kevin Righter, Mark Robinson, Greg Schmidt, Harrison Schmitt, Peter Schultz, James Spann, Paul Spudis, Tim Stubbs, Tim Swindle, Lawrence Taylor, G. Jeffrey Taylor, S. Ross Taylor, Mark Wieczorek, Peter Worden, Maria Zuber
Why the Moon is important for Solar System Science This paper outlines the importance of the Moon for Solar System science and in its own right as a critical target for scientific investigation during the next decade of exploration. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Notre Dame Download File

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Clive R. Neal

Co-Authors: Brad Bailey, Dave Beaty, Mary Sue Bell, Mike Duke, Paul Eckert, John Gruener, Jeff Jones, Robert Kelso, David Kring, Dan Lester, Paul Neitzel, Lewis Peach, Neal Pellis, Mike Ramsey, Debra Reiss-Bubenheim, James Rice, Gerald Sanders, Kurt Sacksteder, Greg Schmidt, Charles Shearer, Kelly Snook, Jim Spann, Paul Spudis, George Tahu, G. Jeffrey Taylor, Lawrence Taylor, Jeff Volosin, Michael Wargo
The Lunar Exploration Roadmap. Exploring the Moon in the 21st Century: Themes, Goals, Objectives, Investigations, and Priorities, 2009 This paper summarizes the long term Lunar Exploration Roadmap that has been developed by the lunar community and coordinated by the Lunar Exploration Analysis Group. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Notre Dame Download File

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John F. Mustard Seeking Signs of Life on a Terrestrial Planet: An Integrated Strategy for the Next Decade of Mars Exploration We propose an integrated strategy to implement missions of high scientific priority, as recommended by the last decadal survey, while still responding to new discoveries. The proposed step-by-step approach to sample return would provide a credible path and conduct important in situ science. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Brown University Download File

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Dr. John F. Mustard Why Mars Remains a Compelling Target for Planetary Exploration Mars has been an extremely compelling exploration target. The Decadal Survey is re-evaluating the priority of different sectors of the planetary exploration program. Based on the data collected since 2002, our conclusion is that the exploration of Mars is even more compelling now than it was then. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Brown University Download File

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Scott L. Murchie

Co-Authors: Andrew S. Rivkin, Joseph Veverka, Peter C. Thomas, Nancy L. Chabot
The Scientific Rationale for Robotic Exploration of Phobos and Deimos Mars'' two moons, Phobos and Deimos, are D-type small bodies that may be remnants of the population that delivered volatiles to the inner solar system. A Discovery class mission can address key science questions at the moons, and prepare for future human exploration. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Laboratory Download File

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Saumitra Mukherjee Effect of Star-burst on Sun-Earth environment Starbursts produces extragalactic cosmic rays which initiate the Sun to develop low Planetary Indices (Kp) and low Electron flux (E-flux) condition of Sun-Earth Environment which leads to snowfall on earth and some changes in other plants of the solar system Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jawaharlal Nehru University Download File

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Yasunori Miura New lunar science and engineering with carbon cycle. New idea and technique with carbon cycle can be applied at lunar crust origin, lunar interior and lunar double construction (surfae and underground) building at the lunar base in future from new carbon-fixing cycle. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Earth & Planet. Material Sci., Yamaguchi University Download File

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Michael Mischna

Co-Authors: Michael Smith, Rob Kursinski, Don Banfield
Atmospheric Science Research Priorities for Mars This paper addresses the exploration of the martian atmosphere, and focuses on broad atmospheric science goals that can be obtained from orbit. It presents the key questions in atmospheric science that remain unanswered, and what progress can be made towards answering them in the coming decade. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Richard S. Miller

Co-Authors: M. Bonamente, S. O’Brien, W. S. Paciesas, M. Bonamente, S. O’Brien, W. S. Paciesas, C. A. Young, D. Ebbets
Lunar Occultation Observer - A Nuclear Astrophysics Mission Concept using the Moon as a Platform for Science The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) is a gamma-ray astrophysics mission concept being developed to probe the nuclear regime. Using the Moon to occult astrophysical sources as they rise and set along the lunar limb, the encoded temporal modulation will be used to image the sky and enable science. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. None of the above. University of Alabama in Huntsville Download File

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Scott Messenger

Co-Authors: Andrew Davis, George Flynn, Lindsay Keller, Allan Treiman, Meenakshi Wadhwa, Andrew Westphal
Sample Return from Primitive Asteroids and Comets This white paper makes the case for sample return from primitive asteroids and comets in the next decade to address some of the most important questions in planetary science relating to the origin and history (and particularly the origin and distribution of organics and water) of the Solar System. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Johnson Space Center Download File

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Stephen M. Merkowitz

Co-Authors: Edward Aaron, Neil Ashby, David Carrier, Douglas Currie, John J. Degnan, Simone Dell’Agnello, Giovanni Delle Monache, Jan McGarry, Thomas W. Murphy, Jr., Kenneth Nordtvedt, Robert D. Reasenberg, Slava G. Turyshev, James G. Williams, Thomas Zagwodzki
The Moon as a Test Body for General Relativity This whitepaper describes how the next generation of lunar laser ranging addresses four key gravitational science questions. In addition, we discuss the current state of retroreflector technology and describe ways in which further advances can be made in laser ranging technologies. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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William B. McKinnon

Co-Authors: S.K. Atreya, K.H. Baines, P.M. Beauchamp,J. Clarke, G.C. Collins, J.E. Connerney, C.J. Hansen, M.D. Hofstadter, T.V. Johnson, R.D. Lorenz, R.T. Pappalardo, C.B. Phillips, J. Radebaugh, P.M. Schenk, L.J. Spilker, T. Spilker, H. Throop, E.P. Turtle, D.A. Williams, T. Balint, A. Coustenis, T. Hurford, J.-P. Lebreton, D.L. Matson, M. McGrath
Exploration Strategy for the Outer Planets 2013-2022: Goals and Priorities Outer Planets Assessment Group (OPAG) recommends that the DS support 1) the JEO and ESJM flagship, 2) Cassini Solstice Mission, and 3) Technology to permit next Outer Planets flagship to Titan/Enceladus, and assess the feasibility of 4) "small flagship" mission class and 5) a set of NF candidates. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Washington University Download File

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Michael D. Max

Co-Authors: Stephen M. Clifford, Arthur H. Johnson, Jeremie Lasue
Is a Resource-Mars a Stepping-Stone to Human Exploration of the Solar System? Methane and water on Mars are the key to a resource base to support sustainable exploration of Mars and beyond Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. MDS Research, LLC Download File

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Edward R. Martinez

Co-Author: Robert V. Frampton
Thermal Protection System Sensors This paper advocates for the development of an aeroshell TPS sensor system to the benefit of all atmospheric reentry missions Agency wide. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Jonathan I. Lunine Saturn''s Titan: A strict test for life''s cosmic ubiquity In this white paper I argue that Titan provides a strict test for the Copernican hypothesis that life is a ubiquitous cosmic phenomenon. Planets with environments like Titan may be common in the cosmos, as they correspond to a roughly 1 AU orbit around M-dwarfs. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. University of Arizona Download File

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Jonathan I. Lunine

Co-Authors: A. Coustenis, P. Beauchamp, K. Reh, G. Bampasitis, L. Bruzzone, M.T. Capria, Coates, A., A.J. Friedson, D. Gautier, R. Jaumann, K.K. Klaus, J-P. Lebreton, T. Livengood, R. Lopes-Gautier, E. Lellouch, R. Lorenz, F-J. Martin-Torres, X. Moussas, C. Nixon, J. Nott, S. Rafkin, F. RaulinLISA Univ. Paris, S. Rodriguez, F. Sohl, A. Solomonidou, E.C. Sitler, J. Soderblom, R. West, M. Wright
The Science of Titan and its Future Exploration This paper describes the science rationale for the next steps beyond Cassini-Huygens of exploration of Saturn''s moon Titan. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. University of Arizona Download File

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Ralph Lorenz

Co-Authors: Terry Hurford, Bruce Bills, Frank Sohl, James Roberts, Christophe Sotin, Hauke Hussmann
The Case for a Titan Geophysical Network Mission Notes the science value of a network of small inexpensive landers focussed on Titan geophysics and that if appropriate radioisotope sources are available, this mission could be affordable under New Frontiers. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Laboratory Download File

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David J. Loftus

Co-Authors: Erin M. Tranfield, Jon C. Rask, Clara McCrosssin
The Chemical Reactivity of Lunar Dust Relevant to Human Exploration As NASA prepares to return to the Moon, a clear understanding of the chemistry of lunar dust is required to set the stage for extended duration lunar surface operations. All aspects of the unique environment of the Moon—micrometeorite bombardment, UV light exposure, solar wind radiation, solar parti Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Amy S. Lo

Co-Authors: Howard Eller, Dean Dailey, Eric Drucker, James Wehner
Secondary Payloads Using LCROSS Architecture The ESPA architecture used by the LCROSS mission enables two capable missions for the cost of one launch. This paper describes our approach for leveraging the capability of the new generation of EELVs to enable secondary planetary missions at well below the cost of an independently launched mission. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems Download File

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Sanjay S. Limaye

Co-Authors: Mark Allen, Sushil Atreya, Kevin H. Baines, Jean-Loup Bertaux, Gordon Bjoraker, Jacques Blamont, Mark Bullock, Eric Chassefiere, Gordon Chin, Curt Covey, David Grinspoon, Samuel Gulkis, Viktor Kerzhanovich, Stephen Lewis, Kevin McGouldrick, W. J. Markiewicz, Rosalyn A. Pertzborn, Christopher Rozoff, Giuseppe Piccioni, Gerald Schubert, Lawrence A. Sromovsky, Colin F. Wilson, Yuk Yung
Venus Atmosphere: Major Questions and Required Observations This paper describes the major questions about the atmosphere of Venus and the observations required to understand it. “How Does Venus atmosphere work?” A dedicated and renewed exploration effort is required to address this fundamental question. Key questions requiring new observations include: H Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Wiscosin - Madison Download File

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Robert J. Lillis

Co-Authors: J. Arkani-Hamed, D. A. Brain, J. C. Cain, J. E. P. Connerney, G. T. Delory, J. Espley, M. Fuller, J. Gattecceca, J. S. Halekas, L. L. Hood, C. L. Johnson, D. Jurdy, G. Kletetschka, B. Langlais, R. P. Lin, K. L. Louzada, M. Manga, C. Milbury, D. Mozzoni, M. Purucker, D. Ravat, J. H. Roberts, P. Rochette, C.T. Russell, S. Smrekar, S. T. Stewart, S. Vennerstrom, B. P. Weiss, K. Whaler
Mars'' Ancient Dynamo and Crustal Remanent Magnetism Mars'' crustal magnetization is unique and enigmatic. It is pertinent to Mars science questions as diverse as the structure of the interior and the evolution of climate. To study it, we recommend 1) extending the MAVEN mission, 2) rover-mounted surface magnetometers and 3) oriented sample return. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. University of California Berkeley Download File

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Samuel J. Lawrence

Co-Authors: Georgiana Y. Kramer, Bradley L. Jolliff, B. Ray Hawke, Mark S. Robinson, Justin J. Hagerty, G. Jeffrey Taylor, Jeffrey Plescia, W. Brent Garry, Julie D. Stopar, Brett W. Denevi, S. E. Braden, L. R. Ostrach, David T. Blewett, Tomas Magna, Thomas R. Watters, Lisa R. Gaddis, Rongxing Li, Clive R. Neal, Jeffrey Gillis-Davis
Sampling the Age Extremes of Lunar Volcanism: the Youngest and Oldest Lunar Basalts Automated sample return missions to the youngest (Procellarum) and oldest (cryptomaria) basalts on the lunar surface will help improve our absolute chronology for the inner Solar System by providing the timing for the beginning and end of lunar basaltic volcanism. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Arizona State University Download File

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Dante S. Lauretta

Co-Authors: Paul Abell, Carlton Allen, Ariel Anbar, Olivier Barnouin-Jha, M. Antonella Barucci, E. Beau Bierhaus, Richard P. Binzel, William F. Bottke, Steven R. Chesley, Beth E. Clark, Edward Cloutis, Harold C. Connolly, Jr., Michael J. Drake, Jason P. Dworkin, M. Darby Dyar, Jack Farmer, Rebecca Ghent, Daniel P. Glavin, Nader Haghighipour, Vicky E. Hamilton, Carl W. Hergenrother, Kip Hodges, Lindsay P. Keller, Detlef Koschny, John Marshall, Scott Messenger, Steven Mielke, Keiko Nakamura-Messenger, Joseph A. Nuth, Dennis Reuter, Frans J. M. Rietmeijer, Kevin Righter, Waddell Robey, Michal Rozyczka, Nicolaus Copernicus, Farid Salama, Scott A. Sandford, Daniel J. Scheeres, Everett Shock, Steve Vance, Brian D. Wade, Kosei E. Yamaguchi
Astrobiology Research Priorities for Primitive Asteroids Study of primitive asteroids is fundamental to understanding the origin, distribution, and evolution of volatile and organic compounds in the early Solar System. This paper outlines six major research focus areas and recommends three mission concepts, which are listed in priority order. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. University of Arizona Download File

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E. Robert Kursinski

Co-Authors: James Lyons, Claire Newman, Mark Richardson
A Dual Satellite Mission Concept for Martian Climate and Chemistry mm-wavelength satellite to satellite occultations combined with solar occultation and thermal IR emission aerosol measurements will tightly and uniquely constrain processes to answer key open questions about the chemistry and climate of Mars. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. University of Arizona Download File

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Kimberly R. Kuhlman

Co-Authors: Alberto Behar, Jack Jones, Penelope Boston, Jeffrey Antol, Gregory Hajos, Warren Kelliher, Max Coleman, Ronald Crawford, Lynn Rothschild, Martin Buehler, Greg Bearman, Daniel W. Wilson, Christopher P. McKay
Tumbleweed: A New Paradigm for Surveying the Surface of Mars Tumbleweeds are lightweight, highly configurable and inexpensive wind-driven vehicles that could enable long-range surveys of the surface of Mars. Their analytical capabilities can be optimized for measurements for astrobiology or in situ resources over relatively large swaths of terrain. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Planetary Science Institute Download File

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Georgiana Young Kramer

Co-Authors: David Blewett, Lon Hood, Jasper Halekas, Sarah Noble, Bernard Ray Hawke, Gunther Kletetschka, Erika Harnett, and Ian Garrick-Bethell
The Lunar Swirls The lunar swirls are high albedo curvilinear surface features coincident with regions of strong remanent magnetism. Investigating the lunar swirls is important to understand the Earth-Moon system, the interaction of planetary surfaces with the solar wind, and how to best explore our solar system. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Bear Fight Center Download File

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Krishan Khurana

Co-Authors: V. Angelopoulos, Charles W. Carlson, Gregory T. Delory, William M. Farrell, Robert E. Grimm, Ian Garrick-Bethell, Jasper S. Halekas, L. L. Hood, M. Horanyi, Robert J.Lillis, Robert P. Lin, Clive R. Neal, M. E. Purucker, Chris T. Russell, Gerry Schubert, D. G. Sibeck, Pavel Travnicek
Lunar Science with ARTEMIS: A Journey from the Moon’s Exosphere to its Core [version 2] This white paper describes the planetary science objectives to be achieved by ARTEMIS, a two-spacecraft constellation en route to the Moon, and presents recommendations pertaining to future lunar science. [version 2] Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. IGPP/UCLA Download File

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Robert M. Kelso A commercially-leveraged, science-focused, lunar exploration program Summarizes the NASA work in assessing use of commercially-demonstrated landers and comm systems to enable early access to the lunar surface for science and exploration. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Headquarters Download File

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Michael J. Kavaya Mars Orbiting Pulsed Doppler Wind Lidar for Characterization of Wind and Dust Technology is described which is well developed and on a path for space. This technology could be used in Mars orbit to provide a global climatology of wind and relative dust as a function of location and altitude. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. NASA Langley Research Center Download File

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Rhawn Joseph Life on Earth Came From Other Planets - 7 Page Summary/Press release If life were to appear on a desert island we wouldn''t claim it was assembled in an organic soup or created by God; we''d conclude it washed to shore or fell from the sky. The Earth too, is an island, orbiting in a sea of space and this is how life on our planet began. None of the above. BrainMind.com Download File

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Rhawn Joseph Life on Earth Came From Other Planets Life on Earth Came From Other Planets, reviews the evidence presented in over 100 peer reviewed scientific papers published in prestigious scientific journals, and explains how life on Earth originated on other planets. The entire 45 page paper will be published in the journal, Cosmology, on 12/2009 None of the above. BrainMind.com Download File

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Thomas D. Jones

Co-Authors: Rob R. Landis, David J. Korsmeyer, Paul A. Abell, Daniel R. Adamo
Strengthening U.S. Exploration Policy via Human Expeditions to Near-Earth Objects By conducting a series of piloted Near-Earth Object (NEO) missions beginning about 2020, the U.S. will reinforce the scientific, economic, programmatic, operations, planetary defense, and public outreach elements of its human exploration program. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Association of Space Explorers Download File

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Brad Jolliff

Co-Authors: Noah Petro, Leon Alkalai, Carlton Allen, Irene Antonenko, Lars Borg, William Bottke, Barbara Cohen, Michael Duke, Amy Fagan, Bernard Foing, Lisa Gaddis, John Gruener, Justin Hagerty, James Head III, Harold Hiesinger, Peter Isaacson, Randy Korotev, Georgiana Kramer, Samuel Lawrence, Gary Lofgren, Tomas Magna, Clive Neal, Marc Norman, Larry Nyquist, Gordon Osinski, Dimitri Papanastassiou, Carle Pieters, Bhairavi Shankar, Tim Swindle, G. Jeffrey Taylor, Allan Treiman, Paul Warren, Mark Wieczorek, Ryan Zeigler, Nicolle Zellner
Constraining Solar System impact history and evolution of the terrestrial planets with exploration of and samples from the Moon’s South Pole-Aitken Basin A fundamental issue of Solar System science is determining the early history of the terrestrial planets, including giant impact bombardment and the evolution of differentiated crust. Exploration and sampling of the Moon’s South Pole–Aitken Basin can illuminate these formative planetary processes. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Washington University, Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Jeffrey R. Johnson

Co-Authors: Tori Hoehler, Frances Westall, Scot Rafkin, Paul Withers, Jeffrey Plescia, Victoria Hamilton, Abhi Tripathi, Darlene Lim
Summary of the Mars Science Goals, Objectives, Investigations, and Priorities This document reflects the synthesis of recent MEPAG Goals Committee activities, MEPAG Science Analysis Groups, workshops, feedback, and discussion of these topics at recent MEPAG meetings. It was prepared by the MEPAG Goals and Executive Committees with assistance of many Mars community members. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. United States Geological Survey Download File

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Jeffrey R. Johnson

Co-Authors: B. Archinal, R. Kirk, L. Gaddis, J. Anderson, B. Bussey, R. Beyer, L. Bleamaster, W. Patterson, J. Gillis-Davis, T. Watters, P. Schenk, B. Denevi
The Importance of a Planetary Cartography Program: Status and Recommendations for NASA 2013-2023 We describe 7 areas where greater attention should be paid to data returned from planetary missions, beyond minimum “mission success”. The alternative is duplication of efforts and greater chances for errors, thereby diminishing the cost return and scientific potential provided by planetary data. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. United States Geological Survey Download File

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Bruce Jakosky

Co-Authors: Richard W. Zurek, Jan Amend, Michael H. Carr, Daniel J. McCleese, John F. Mustard, Kenneth Nealson, Roger Summons
Update: Are There Signs of Life on Mars? A Scientific Rationale for a Mars Sample-Return Campaign As The Next Step in Solar System Exploration Update: Discussion of the scientific rationale for Mars sample return as the next step in understanding solar-system exploration and Mars astrobiology. Sample return is discussed in the context of a Mars exploration program and the fiscal reality of the Mars program. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. University of Colorado Download File

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Naoya Imae Supporting the sample return from Mars I heartfully indicate the support on the sample return mission from Mars, and the indispensable facilities in laboratories. Because the sample return mission is the keys of essential problems for Planetary Science. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. National Institute of Polar Research Download File

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Dana M. Hurley

Co-Authors: David J. Lawrence, Raul Baragiola, D. Benjamin Bussey, Anthony Colaprete, M. Darby Dyar, Anthony F. Egan, Richard C. Elphic, William Farrell, William Feldman, James R. Gaier, Jacob Grimes, Jasper S. Halekas, Erika Harnett, James N. Head, Jennifer Heldmann, Amanda Hendrix, Charles A. Hibbitts, Kurt D. Retherford, Catherine Neish, Sarah Noble, Carle Pieters, Paul D. Spudis, Timothy J. Stubbs, Bradley J. Thomson, Kris Zacny
Lunar Polar Volatiles and Associated Processes A landed/mobile mission to a lunar permanently shadowed region (PSR) should identify the composition, abundance, and distribution of volatiles in lunar PSRs. The next step is obtaining a detailed understanding of the transport/deposition/retention system to unravel the history of polar volatiles. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Laboratory Download File

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Terry Hurford

Co-Authors: B. Buratti, A. Coustenis, A. Dombard, R. Greenberg, H. Hussmann, M. Kirchoff, C. Porco, A. Rymer, S. Vance, A. Verbiscer
The Case for Enceladus Science In this white paper, we will outline important science questions regarding Enceladus and show the link between these science questions and major themes of exploration as identified by NASA. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Terry Hurford

Co-Authors: B. Buratti, A. Coustenis, A. Dombard, R. Greenberg, H. Hussmann, M. Kirchoff, C. Porco, A. Rymer
The Case for an Enceladus New Frontiers Mission In this white paper, we will summarize one possible mission concept to explore Enceladus within a New Frontiers-level mission: to stay below the cost cap of $650M (FY09 dollars) and within the launch capability of the Atlas V 551. We imagine that there are other possible mission scenarios... Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Steven Howe

Co-Authors: Brian Gross, Jeff Katalenich, Robert O’Brien, Logan Sailer
The Mars Hopper: Long Range Mobile Platform Powered by Martian In-Situ Resources The CSNR is designing an instrumented platform that can acquire detailed data at hundreds of locations during its 10 year lifetime - a Mars Hopper. By accumulating thermal power from a radioisotope source, the platform will be able to “hop” from one location to the next every 2-3 days with a separa Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Idaho National Laboratory Download File

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Mark Hofstadter

Co-Authors: Don Banfield, Linda Brown, Thibault Cavalie, Imke de Pater, Scott Edgington, Leigh Fletcher, A. James Friedson, Daniel Gautier, Sam Gulkis, Mark Gurwell, Patrick Irwin, Erich Karkoschka, Jean-Pierre Lebreton, Julianne Moses, Glenn Orton, Kathy Rages, Peter Read, Adam P. Showman, Nicholas Teanby, P. Yanamandra-Fisher
The Atmospheres of the Ice Giants, Uranus and Neptune We believe many important atmospheric science questions can only be addressed by studies of the ice giants Uranus and Neptune. These questions relate to fundamental atmospheric processes that help us understand the formation, evolution, and current structure of all planets. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Mark Hofstadter

Co-Authors: David Atkinson, Kevin Baines, Shawn Brooks, Imke de Pater, Leigh Fletcher, A. James Friedson, Mark Gurwell, Matthew Hedman, Brigette Hesman, Patrick Irwin, Sanjay Limaye, Steven Miller, Robert Moeller, Julianne Moses, Neil Murphy, Glenn Orton, Robert Pappalardo, Kathy Rages, Nicole Rappaport, Christophe Sotin, Linda Spilker, Thomas Spilker, Tom Stallard, Matthew Tiscareno, Elizabeth Turtle, Daniel Wenkert
The Case for a Uranus Orbiter This paper discusses some of the fundamental science that must be done at Uranus if we are to understand our Solar System and systems discovered around other stars. We suggest a Uranus Orbiter should be launched in the next decade. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Robert Hodyss

Co-Authors: Paul D. Cooper, Reggie Hudson, Robert Carlson, Paul V. Johnson, Arthur L. Lane, Marla Moore, Louis J. Allamandola
Recommended Laboratory Studies in Support of Planetary Science: Surface Chemistry of Icy Bodies We identify several areas where an increased emphasis on laboratory activities would lead to a significant return in scientific results, based on an enhanced understanding of the fundamental surface chemistry of icy bodies. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Charles A. Hibbitts

Co-Authors: James Bauer, Pietro Bernasconi, John Clarke, Deborah Domingue Josh Emery, Randy Gladstone, Tommy Greathouse, Gary Hansen, Walt Harris, Amanda Hendrix, Noam Izenberg, Carey Lisse, Larry Paxton, Jeff Percival, Kurt Retherford, Andy Rivkin, Mark Swain, Eliot Young
Stratospheric Balloon Missions for Planetary Science A Petition for the Formation of a Working Group to Study the Feasibility of a Facility Platform to Support Planetary Science Missions Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Laboratory Download File

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Michael Hecht

Co-Authors: W. Thomas Pike, Walter Goetz, Morten Bo Madsen, Janice L. Bishop, Urs Staufer, Kjartan M. Kinch, Kristoffer Leer
The microstructure of the martian surface Martian soil is a microcosm of the mineralogical history of the planet, and it exerts a primary influence on atmospheric, geological, and periglacial properties. We propose an increased emphasis on microanalysis in future Mars surface exploration. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Michael Hecht

Co-Authors: Kathryn Fishbaugh, Shane Byrne, Ken Herkenhoff, Stephen Clifford, Timothy N. Titus, Oded Aharonson
Next Steps in Mars Polar Science: In Situ Subsurface Exploration of the North Polar Layered Deposits The polar regions of Mars represent a unique environment for determining the mechanisms of martian climate change over geological time. Using terrestrial paleoclimatology methods, subsurface access to the polar layer deposits should be a high priority for future Mars exploration. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Samad A. Hayati

Co-Authors: Michelle Munk, Dick Powell, Bob Gershman, Ying Lin, Karen Buxbaum, Paul Backes, Steve Gorevan, Dave Stephenson, Dave Anderson, John Dankanich, Carl Allen, Don Pearson, Tom Rivellini, Issa Nesnas, Gary Bolotin, Charles Budney, Aron Wolf, Joseph Riedel
Strategic Technology Development for Future Mars Missions (2013-2022) This white paper focuses on enabling technologies for several candidate concepts for future Mars missions. These missions are described in MEPAG position white papers developed for the decadal survey. The technologies, their current status, and their approximate costs and schedules are described. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Walter Harris

Co-Authors: Walter Harris, Eric Burgh, John Clarke, Joshua Colwell, Michael Davis, Daniel Durda, Charles Hibbitts, Stephan McCandliss, Jeffrey Morgenthaler, Kurt Retherford, Ronald Vervack
Solar System Suborbital Research: A Vital Investment in the Scientific Techniques, Technology, and Investigators of Space Exploration in the 21st Century. Recent calls for increased NASA technology and training development cite shortages with current trends. Suborbital and Explorer missions are key this but have been cut in the past 20 years. Planetary research supports no small missions at all. We describe how suborbital research can address this gap None of the above. University of California, Davis Download File

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Candice Hansen

Co-Authors: J.A. Stansberry, A.S. Aljabri, D. Banfield, E.B. Bierhaus, M. Brown, J. E. Colwell, M. Dougherty, A.R. Hendrix, K. Khurana, D. Landau, A. McEwen, D.A. Paige, C. Paranicas, C.M. Satter, B. Schmidt, M. Showalter, T. Spilker, L.J. Spilker, N. Strange, M. Tiscareno, W.M. Grundy, N. Haghighipour, K.S. Noll, E. Schaller, S. Sheppard
KBO Science with Argo - A Voyage through the Outer Solar System Argo is an innovative pragmatic concept for a New Frontiers 4 mission which exploits an upcoming launch window that permits a close Triton encounter during a flyby through the Neptune system, and then continues on to a scientifically-selected Kuiper Belt Object. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Candice Hansen

Co-Authors: A.S.Aljabri, D.Banfield, E.B.Bierhaus, M.Brown, J.E.Colwell, M.Dougherty, A.R.Hendrix, H.Hussmann, K.Khurana, D.Landau, A.McEwen, D.A.Paige, C.Paranicas, C.M.Satter, B.Schmidt, M.Showalter, L.J.Spilker, T.Spilker, J.Stansberry, N.Strange, M.Tiscareno, Steve Vance
Triton science with Argo - A Voyage through the Outer Solar System Argo is an innovative pragmatic concept for a New Frontiers 4 mission to significantly expand our knowledge of the outer Solar System. It exploits an upcoming launch window that permits a close Triton encounter during a flyby through the Neptune system, and then continues on to a scientifically-sel Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Candice Hansen

Co-Authors: A.S.Aljabri, D.Banfield, E.B.Bierhaus, M.Brown, J.E.Colwell, M.Dougherty, A.R.Hendrix, A.Ingersoll, K.Khurana, D.Landau, A.McEwen, D.A.Paige, C.Paranicas, C.M.Satter, B.Schmidt, M.Showalter, L.J.Spilker, T.Spilker, J.Stansberry, N.Strange, M.Tiscareno
Neptune Science with Argo - A Voyage through the Outer Solar System Argo is an innovative pragmatic concept for a New Frontiers 4 mission which exploits an upcoming launch window that permits a close Triton encounter during a flyby through the Neptune system, and then continues on to a scientifically-selected Kuiper Belt Object. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Jasper Halekas

Co-Authors: M. Fuller, I. Garrick-Bethell, L. L. Hood, C. L. Johnson, K. Lawrence, R. J. Lillis, R. P. Lin, M. Manga, M. E. Purucker, B. P. Weiss
Determining the origins of lunar remanent crustal magnetism The discovery of lunar magnetic fields of crustal origin was a major scientific surprise of the Apollo program. Solving the enigma of lunar remanent crustal magnetization will provide fundamental insights into the thermal history of the lunar core/dynamo, mantle, and crust, and into the processes by which crustal magnetization is acquired on airless bodies - for instance, large basin-forming impacts. Determining the origin and history of lunar crustal magnetism will require the return of oriented samples... Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of California Berkeley Download File

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Murthy Gudipati

Co-Authors: Michael A''Hearn, Nancy Brickhouse, John Cowan, Paul Drake, Steven Federman, Gary Ferland, Adam Frank, Wick Haxton, Eric Herbst, Michael Mumma, Farid Salama, Daniel Wolf Savin, Lucy Ziurys
Laboratory Studies for Planetary Sciences The WGLA of the AAS promotes collaboration and exchange of knowledge between astronomy and planetary sciences and the laboratory sciences (physics, chemistry, and biology). Laboratory data needs of ongoing and next generation planetary science missions are carefully evaluated and recommended. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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William Grundy

Co-Authors: W.B. McKinnon, E. Ammannito, M. Aung, J. Bellerose, F. Brenker, D. Blewett, J.C. Castillo, A.F. Cheng, M.C. De Sanctis, J.P. Emery, J.-Y. Li, C. Hansen-Koharcheck, M.J. Kuchner, A. Lovell, L.A. McFadden, W.J. Merline, K.S. Noll, C.B. Olkin, W.M. Owen, N. Pinilla-Alonso, D. Ragozzine, J.E. Riedel, A.S. Rivkin, C.T. Russell, J.A. Stansberry, M.V. Sykes, S.C. Tegler, A.J. Verbiscer, F. Vilas, H.A. Weaver, H. Yano, E.F. Young
Small Bodies Community White Paper: Exploration Strategy for the Ice Dwarf Planets 2013-2022 This paper identifies the top-level science issues, mission priorities, research and technology needs, and programmatic balance for the exploration of Dwarf Planets. This paper was organized by the Small Bodies Assessment Group. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Lowell Observatory Download File

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Eberhard Gruen

Co-Authors: Frank Postberg, Harald Krüger, Mihaly Horanyi, Elmar Jessberger Sascha Kempf, Ralf Srama, Thomas Stephan, Zoltan Sternovsky
In-Situ Mass Spectrometry of Atmosphereless Planetary Objects Dust particles emitted from atmosphereless planetary objects are samples of their surfaces. By mass analyzing these particles and tracing back their trajectories to their sources the surface composition of Mercury, planetary satellites, dusty rings sources, asteroids and comets can be obtained. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. LASP, University of Colorado Download File

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David Grinspoon

Co-Authors: Mark Bullock, James Kasting, Janet Luhmann, Peter Read, Scot Rafkin, Sanjay Limaye, Kevin McGouldrick, Gordon Chin, Samuel Gulkis, Feng Tian, Eric Chassefiere, Hakan Svedhem, Vikki Meadows
Comparative Planetary Climate Studies It is the purpose of this White Paper to draw attention to, and summarize, the important role that planetary exploration, and research with a comparative planetology focus, have played and should continue to play in our understanding of climate, and climate change, on Earth. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Denver Museum of Nature & Science Download File

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Robert Grimm Electromagnetic Sounding of Solid Planets and Satellites EM methods can sense subsurface structure from meters to a thousand kilometers. This white paper gives a tutorial on material sensitivities, exploration depths, sources, and particularly what measurements must be made for different target bodies, without specific mission endorsements. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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John Grant

Co-Authors: Matt Golombek, Alfred McEwen, Scott Murchie, Frank Seelos, John Mustard, David Des Marais, Ken Tanaka, Gian Ori, Nicolas Mangold, Kate Fishbaugh, Steve Ruff, Dawn Sumner, Brad Jolliff, Ralph Harvey
Future Mars Landing Site Selection Activities A process for identifying candidate landing sites for future missions should be started and accompanied by creation of funding to support landing site characterization activities. NASA should provide resources to existing missions to enable these activities and consider including instruments for sit Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Smithsonian Institution Download File

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Jon D. Giorgini

Co-Authors: Lance A. M. Benner, Marina Brozovic, Michael W. Busch, Donald B. Campbell, Steven R. Chesley, Paul W. Chodas, Ellen Howell, Jean-Luc Margot, Andrea Milani Petr Pravec, Robert A. Preston, Maria-Eugenia Sansaturio, Daniel J. Scheeres, Michael K. Shepard, Arnold Silva, Martin A. Slade, Patrick A. Taylor, Giovanni Valsecchi, David Vokrouhlický, Donald K. Yeomans
Radar Astrometry of Small Bodies: Detection, Characterization, Trajectory Prediction, and Hazard Assessment Radar astrometry reduces trajectory uncertainties by orders of magnitude, thereby improving prediction, targeting, and impact probability estimates for small-bodies, while characterizing some at levels comparable to a spacecraft flyby. This improves resource use for ground and flight investigations. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Barry Geldzahler

Co-Author: Les Deutsch
Future Plans for the Deep Space Network (DSN) NASA’s Deep Space Network (DSN) is a critical part of every NASA solar system mission, serving as the entity that ties the spacecraft back to Earth and providing data from science instruments, information for navigating across the solar system, and valuable radio link science and radar observations. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Headquarters Download File

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James B. Garvin

Co-Authors: Lori S. Glaze, Sushil Atreya, Bruce Campbell, Don Campbell, Peter Ford, Walter Kiefer, Frank Lemoine, Greg Neumann, Roger Phillips, Keith Raney
Venus: Constraining Crustal Evolution from Orbit Via High-Resolution Geophysical and Geological Reconnaissance Major gaps in understanding Venus include how planetary-scale crustal resurfacing operated, the formation and evolution of highlands, and whether evidence of past environments is preserved. These questions can be addressed through an orbiting radar altimeter and high resolution SAR imager. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Ian Garrick-Bethell

Co-Authors: Cassandra Runyon, Carle Pieters, Michael Wyatt, Peter Isaacson, Linda Elkins-Tanton
Ensuring United States Competitiveness in the 21st Century Global Economy with a Long-Term Lunar Exploration Program A focused Lunar Exploration Program can help retain United States economic and strategic leadership in the 21st century. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Brown University Download File

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Marc Fries

Co-Authors: John Armstrong, James Ashley, Luther Beegle, Timothy Jull, Glenn Sellar
Extralunar Materials in Lunar Regolith This paper describes the scientific rationale for locating and studying extralunar material found in lunar regolith. The extreme age and lack of weathering of lunar regolith make it a natural repository for samples from a wide range of parent bodies and across a vast span of solar system history. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Friedemann T. Freund Previously Overlooked/Ignored Electronic Charge Carriers in Rocks I would like to draw the attention of members of the Decadal Survey Committee to a rather fundamental discovery, which (I believe) will have a major impact on the Earth and Planetary Sciences in the coming years. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. NASA Ames Research Center/ SETI Institute Download File

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Jonathan J. Fortney

Co-Authors: Kevin Zahnle, Isabelle Baraffe, Adam Burrows, Sarah E. Dodson-Robinson, Gilles Chabrier, Tristan Guillot, Ravit Helled, Franck Hersant, William B. Hubbard, Jack J. Lissauer, Mark S. Marley
Planetary Formation and Evolution Revealed with a Saturn Entry Probe: The Importance of Noble Gases The determination of Saturn’s atmospheric noble gas abundances are critical to understanding the formation and evolution of Saturn, and giant planets in general. These measurements can only be performed with an entry probe. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. University of California, Santa Cruz Download File

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Leigh N. Fletcher

Co-Authors: G. Orton, T. Stallard, K. Baines, K. M. Sayanagi, F. J. Martin-Torres, M. Hofstadter, I. de Pater, S. Edgington, R. Morales-Juberias, T. Livengood, D. Huestis, P. Hartogh, D.H. Atkinson, J. Moses, M. Wong, U. Dyudina, A.J. Friedson, T.R. Spilker, R.T. Pappalardo, P.G.J. Irwin, N. Teanby, T. Cavalié, O. Mousis, A.P. Showman, X. Liu, M.B. Lystrup, S. Gulkis, T. Greathouse, R. K. Achterberg, G.L. Bjoraker, S.S. Limaye, P. Read, D. Gautier, D.S. Choi, T. Kostiuk, A.F. Nagy, D. Huestis, M. Choukroun, I. Muller-Wodarg, P. Yanamandra-Fisher
Jupiter Atmospheric Science in the Next Decade We outline atmospheric science goals and requirements for Jupiter in the next decade exploration (Juno, EJSM, Observatories, probes) in 5 themes: formation and evolution, weather-layer dynamics, coupling with the interior, interactions with the external environment and time-variable phenomena. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Yan Fernandez

Co-Authors: P. A. Abell, E. Ammannito, M. Aung, J. M. Bauer, J. Bellerose, H. Campins, J. Castillo-Rogez, A. F. Cheng, C. M. Dalle Ore, M. C. de Sanctis, J. P. Emery, T. Grav, W. M. Grundy, N. Haghighipour, M. J. Kuchner, J.-Y. Li, K. J. Meech, B. E. A. Mueller, K. S. Noll, C. B. Olkin, W. M. Owen, N. Pinilla-Alonso, D. Ragozzine, J. E. Riedel, E. L. Schaller, D. J. Scheeres, S. S. Sheppard, J. A. Stansberry, M. V. Sykes, J. M. Trigo-Rodríguez, D. E. Trilling, A. J. Verbiscer, H. A. Weaver, H. Yano, E. Young
Small Bodies Community White Paper: Goals and Priorities for the Study of Centaurs and Trans-Neptunian Objects in the Next Decade This paper identifies the top-level science issues, mission priorities, research and technology needs, and programmatic balance for the exploration of Centaurs and Small Irregular TNOs. This paper was organized by the Small Bodies Assessment Group. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. University of Central Florida Download File

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W. M. Farrell

Co-Author: Mihaly Horanyi
The Lunar Dusty Exosphere: The Extreme Case of an Inner Planetary Atmosphere The Moon is an extreme type of atmosphere – a surface bounded exosphere – and may represent the final ‘ground state’ of any geologically dormant body. Neutral gas and dust are emitted from its surface via universal processes believed to be occurring at all near-airless bodies. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / University of Colorado Download File

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Jack D. Farmer

Co-Authors: Mark Allen, Tori Hoehler, Michael Mischna
Astrobiology Research and Technology Priorities for Mars This white paper provides a broad overview of the major science and technology drivers for the next decade of Mars exploration. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Arizona State University Download File

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Ashley Espy

Co-Authors: Amara Graps, Nicolas Altobelli, Jürgen Blum, Don Brownlee, Humberto Campins, Sigrid Close, William Cooke, Stanley Dermott, Gerhard Drolshagen, Eberhard Grün, Doug Hamilton, Matthew Hedman, Mihaly Horányi, Peter Jenniskens, Thomas Kehoe, Steve Kortenkamp, Harald Krüger, Marc Kuchner, J.-C. Liou, Carey Lisse, Greg Madsen, Ingrid Mann, Brian May, Scott Messenger, Nicole Meyer-Vernet, David Nesvorny, Pasquale Palumbo, William Reach, Chris Russell, Ralf Srama, Mark Sykes, Josep Trigo-Rodríguez, Jeremie Vaubaillon, Harold Weaver, Hajime Yano, Michael Zolensky
Small Bodies Community White Paper: Interplanetary Dust This paper identifies the top-level science issues, mission priorities, research and technology needs, and programmatic balance for the exploration of Interplanetary Dust. This paper was organized by the Small Bodies Assessment Group. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. University of Florida, Southwest Research Institute Download File

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Larry W. Esposito Mission Concept: Venus in situ Explorer (VISE) A proposed New Frontiers mission concept for Venus lander. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. LASP, University of Colorado Download File

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Charles D., Jr. Edwards

Co-Authors: William B. Banerdt, David W. Beaty, Leslie K. Tamppari, Richard W. Zurek
Relay Orbiters for Enhancing and Enabling Mars In Situ Exploration This white paper describes the role that orbital relay telecommunications have played as an integral part of science investigation of Mars, and the importance and continuing evolution for support to future missions. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Eldar Z. Noe Dobrea

Co-Authors: S. Murchie, J.F. Mustard, J.L. Bishop, N.K. McKeown
Near-Infrared imaging spectroscopy of the surface of Mars at meter-scales to constrain the geological origin of hydrous alteration products, identify candidate sites and samples for future in-situ and sample return missions, and guide rover operations Near-infrared imaging spectrometers capable of mapping hydrous minerals on the surface of Mars at meter-scales from orbit, as well as hypespectral NIR imagers on landed rovers not only enhance the scientific return of orbital and rover missions, but will be critical in guiding future rover operation Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Planetary Science Institute Download File

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Andrew M. Davis

Co-Authors: Meenakshi Wadhwa, Christine Floss, Bradley L. Jolliff, Scott Messenger, Dimitri A. Papanastassiou, Allan Treiman, Andrew J. Westphal
Development of Capabilities and Instrumentation for Curation and Analysis of Returned Samples The purpose of this white paper is to emphasize the importance of investments in sample curation and analytical instrument development for the full realization of the science objectives of any sample return missions in the coming decade. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. University of Chicago Download File

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J.B. Dalton

Co-Authors: J.C. Castillo, L.R. Brown, R.P. Hodyss, P.V. Johnson, M. Gudipati, R.M. Mastrapa, K. McKeegan, R.N. Clark, P.H. Schultz, A.R. Hendrix, S.T. Stewart, S. Ruff, K.P. Hand, T. Spilker
Recommended Laboratory Studies in Support of Planetary Science Planetary science in the next decade will include major spacecraft missions to inner and outer solar system targets. Interpretation of these mission observations requires knowledge of fundamental physical and chemical properties of planetary materials. Much theoretical work at present depends upon r Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Andrew Daga

Co-Authors: Carlton Allen, James Burke, Ian Crawford, Richard Leveille, Steven Simon, Lin Tze Tan
Lunar and Martian Lava Tube Exploration as Part of an Overall Scientific Survey This paper discusses the opportunity to search for and exploit lava tubes on the surfaces of the Moon and Mars as a means of enabling ambitious planetary science missions. [FINAL VERSION] Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Andrew Daga & Associates LLC Download File

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Arlin Crotts On Lunar Volatiles and Their Importance to Resource Utilization and Lunar Science We discuss recent, compelling evidence for major lunar volatiles not necessarily found in polar permanently-shadowed crater cold traps, but originating from the deep interior. We also discuss programs underway to study lunar volatiles, which unfortunately fall far short of the NRC''s SCEM goals. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Columbia University Download File

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Ian Crawford

Co-Authors: Mahesh Anand, Professor Mark Burchell, James Carpenter, Barbara Cohen, Leon Croukamp, Andrew Daga, Hilary Downes, Sarah Fagents, Terence Hackwill, James N Head, Essam Heggy, Adrian Jones, Katherine Joy, Christian Koeberl, Philippe Lognonné, Clive Neal, Noah Petro, Professor Sara Russell, Joshua Snape, Larry Taylor, Allan Treiman, Shoshana Weider, Mark Wieczorek, Lionel Wilson
The Scientific Rationale for Renewed Human Exploration of the Moon This paper outlines the scientific benefits that will follow from renewed human exploration of the Moon. [Final version with updated author list] Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Birkbeck College London Download File

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William B.C. Crandall A Decadal Shift: From Space Exploration Science to Space Utilization Science We urge the Decadal Survey Committee, which is charged with developing “a comprehensive science and mission strategy for planetary science,” to temporarily shift research priorities in the United States from space exploration science to space utilization science. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Space Wealth Download File

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Athena Coustenis

Co-Authors: J. Lunine, D. Matson, K. Reh, P. Beauchamp, J.-M.Charbonnier, L. Bruzzone, M.-T. Capria, A. Coates, C. Hansen, R. Jaumann, J.-P. Lebreton, R. Lopes, R. Lorenz, I. Mueller-Wodarg, F. Raulin, E. Sittler, J. Soderblom, F. Sohl, C. Sotin, T. Spilker, N. Strange, T. Tokano, E. Turtle, H. Waite, L. Gurvits, C. Nixon, T. Livengood, J. Blamont, R. Achterberg, M. Allen, C. Anderson, D. Atkinson, T. Balint, G. Bampasidis, D. Banfield, A. Bar-Nun, J. Barnes, R. Beebe, E. Bierhaus, G. Bjoraker, D. Burr, F. Crary, J. Cui, J. Elliott, M. Flasar, A. Friedson, M. Galand, D. Gautier, M. Gurwell, J. Head, M. Hirtzig, T. Hurford, T. Johnson, K. Klaus, W. Kurth, E. Lellouch, J. Martin-Torres, K. Mitchell, X. Moussas, M. Munk, C. Neish, L. Norman, B. Noyelles, G. Orton, A. Pankine, D. Pascu , E. Pencil, S. Rafkin, T. Ray, F. Rocard, S. Rodriguez, A. Solomonidou, L. Spilker, R. West, D. Williams, E. Wilson, M. Wright, V. Zivkovic
Future in situ balloon exploration of Titan’s atmosphere and surface Many of the questions remaining to be addressed after the Cassini-Huygens mission require both remote and in situ exploration. Our understanding of the lower atmosphere, surface and interior of Titan will benefit greatly from detailed investigations by a montgolfiere, reaching a variety of locations Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Paris Observatory, France Download File

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John F. Cooper

Co-Authors: Steven J. Sturner, Chris Paranicas, Matthew E. Hill, Abigail M. Rymer, Paul D. Cooper, Dan Pascu, Robert E. Johnson, Timothy A. Cassidy, Thomas M. Orlando, Kurt D. Retherford, Nathan A. Schwadron, Ralf I. Kaiser, François Leblanc, Louis J. Lanzerotti, Claudia J. Alexander, Henry B. Garrett, Amanda R. Hendrix, Wing H. Ip
Space Weathering Impact on Solar System Surfaces and Mission Science Space weathering is the collection of physical processes acting to erode and chemically modify planetary surfaces directly exposed to space environments of planetary magnetospheres, the heliosphere, and the local interstellar environment of the solar system. Space weathering affects the physical and Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Pamela G. Conrad

Co-Authors: F. Scott Anderson, Robert C. Anderson, William J. Brinckerhoff, Peter Doran, Victoria E. Hamilton, Joel A. Hurowitz, Alfred S. McEwan, Douglas W. Ming , Dimitri A. Papanastassiou, Timothy D. Swindle
Geochronology and Mars Exploration: Critical Measurements for 21st Century Planetary Science We present arguments for geochronology as a high scientific priority for Mars exploration in specific and planetary science in general. We also recommend funding four specific activities toward achieving technical readiness for addressing this priority. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Geoffrey Collins

Co-Authors: Claudia J. Alexander, Amy C. Barr, Edward B. Bierhaus, Michael T. Bland, Veronica J. ray, Lorenzo Bruzzone, Emma Bunce, Andrew Coates, John F. Cooper, Frank Crary, Andrew J. Dombard, Gianrico Filacchione, Olivier Grasset, Gary B. Hansen, Amanda R. Hendrix, Charles A. Hibbitts, Terry A. Hurford, Hauke Hussmann, Ralf Jaumann, Ozgur Karatekin, Krishan K. Khurana, Michelle R. Kirchoff, Jean-Pierre Lebreton, Melissa A. McGrath, Jeffrey M. Moore, Robert T. Pappalardo, G. Wesley Patterson, Christina Plainaki, Louise M. Prockter, Kurt Retherford, James H. Roberts, Paul M. Schenk, David A. Senske, Adam P. Showman, Katrin Stephan, Federico Tosi, Roland J. Wagner
Ganymede science questions and future exploration This paper summarizes outstanding science questions about Ganymede and its place in the Jupiter system, and how further exploration would answer these questions. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Wheaton College, Massachusetts Download File

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Michael R. Collier

Co-Authors: Thomas E. Cravens, Mats Holmstrom, James Burch, Konrad Dennerl, Herbert Gunell, David G. Sibeck, Steven Snowden, F. Scott Porter, Ina P. Robertson, Nick Omidi, Kip Kuntz, Steven Sembay, Jennifer Carter, Andrew Read, Dimitra Koutroumpa, Massimiliano Galeazzi, Susan Lepri, K.C. Hansen, Dan McCammon, Ruth Skoug, H. Kent Hills, Timothy J. Stubbs, Pavel M. Travnicek, George Fraser, Mark Lester
Global Imaging of Solar Wind-Planetary Body Interactions using Soft X-ray Cameras We show in this white paper that, with suitable instrumentation on planetary and terrestrial spacecraft, soft X-ray emission associated with the solar wind interaction with planetary neutral atoms can map out the solar wind distribution around planets, including the locations of plasma boundaries. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Karla B. Clark Europa Jupiter System Mission The baseline EJSM architecture consists the NASA-led Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO), and the ESA-led Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO). Complementary instruments monitor dynamic phenomena, map the Jovian magnetosphere and its interactions with the Galilean satellites, and characterize water oceans beneat Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Vincent F. Chevrier

Co-Authors: Derek Sears, Megan Elwood Madden, Essam Heggy
Laboratory Measurements in Support of Present and Future Missions to Mars The case is made that supporting laboratory measurements and facilities should be considered an integral element of the Nation’s Mars exploration program, since they provide a meaningful interpretation of the returned data, validation of theoretical models, and calibration of instruments. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Arkansas Center for Space and Planetary Science Download File

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Andrew F. Cheng

Co-Authors: Andrew Rivkin, Patrick Michel, Carey Lisse, Kevin Walsh, Keith Noll, Darin Ragozzine, Clark Chapman, William Merline, Lance Benner, Daniel Scheeres
Binary and Multiple Systems A sizable fraction of small bodies is found in binary or multiple systems. Understanding the formation processes of such systems is critical to understanding collisional and dynamical evolution. Missions can offer enhanced science return if they target binaries or multiples. [FINAL version] Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Laboratory Download File

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Julie Castillo-Rogez

Co-Authors: William B. Durham, Essam Heggy, Mathieu Choukroun, Jerome Noir, Sarah T. Stewart, Steve D. Vance, Christine M. McCarthy, Martin B. Barmatz, Pamela G. Conrad
Laboratory Studies in Support of Planetary Geophysics We summarize the rationale for advocating a healthy and sustained program of laboratory research in support of the geophysical exploration of planetary bodies. We address the challenges inherent to this discipline, and we suggest recommendations for the review panel''s consideration. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Bruce A. Campbell

Co-Authors: John A. Grant, Ted Maxwell, Jeffrey J. Plaut, Anthony Freeman
Exploring the Shallow Subsurface of Mars with Imaging Radar: Scientific Promise and Technical Rationale Global information on martian near-surface features and physical properties represents a great untapped aspect of the search for habitable zones and evidence of past climate. Imaging radar measurements can penetrate several meters of mantling material and 10’s of meters into ice. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Smithsonian Institution Download File

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Jack Burns

Co-Authors: E. Hallman, D. Duncan, J. Darling, & J. Stocke, J. Lazio, K. Weiler, J. Hewitt, C. Carilli, R. Bradley, T. Bastian, J. Ulvestad, J. Kasper & L. Greenhill, R. MacDowall, S. Merkowitz, J. McGarry, Zagwodzki, P. Yeh, H. Thronson, S. Ne, D. Currie, T. Murphy, S. Furlanetto & A. Mesinger, A. Loeb, J. Pritchard & E. Visbal, D. Jones, G. Taylor, K. Nordtvedt, J. Bowman, J. Grunsfeld, S. Bale, B. Wandelt, H. Falcke
Science from the Moon: The NASA/NLSI Lunar University Network for Astrophysics Research (LUNAR) The Moon is a unique platform for fundamental astrophysical measurements of gravitation, the Sun, and the Universe. With the aim of providing additional perspective on the Moon as a scientific platform, this white paper describes key research projects involving astrophysics from the Moon. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of Colorado Download File

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Bonnie Buratti

Co-Authors: Eleonora Ammannito, Erik Asphaug, MiMi Aung, James Bauer, Julie Bellerose, David Blewett, William Bottke, Daniel Britt, Julie Castillo-Rogez, Tommy Grav, Eberhard Gruen, Nader Haghighipour, Doug Hamilton, James Head, Andrew Klesh, Steve Kortenkamp, Jian-Yang Li, Scott Murchie, David Nesvorny, Catherine Olkin, William Owen, Joseph Riedel, Andrew Rivkin, Daniel Scheeres, Scott S. Sheppard, Mark V. Sykes, Peter Thomas, Anne Verbiscer, Faith Vilas, Hajime Yano, Eliot Young
Small Bodies Community White Paper: The Small Satellites of the Solar System This paper identifies the top-level science issues, mission priorities, research and technology needs, and programmatic balance for the exploration of Small Satellites. This paper was organized by the Small Bodies Assessment Group. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Mark A. Bullock

Co-Authors: David A. Senske, Tibor. S. Balint, Alexis Benz, Bruce A. Campbell, Eric Chassefiere, Anthony Colaprete, James A. Cutts, Lori Glaze, Stephen Gorevan, David H. Grinspoon, Jeff Hall, George L. Hashimoto, James W. Head, Gary Hunter, Natasha Johnson, Viktor V. Kerzhanovich, Walter S. Kiefer, Elizabeth A. Kolawa, Tibor Kremic, Johnny Kwok, Sanjay S. Limaye, Stephen J. Mackwell, Mikhail Y. Marov, Adriana Ocampo, Gerald Schubert, Ellen R. Stofan, Hakan Svedhem, Dimitri V. Titov, Allen H. Treiman
The Venus Science and Technology Definition Team Flagship This white paper describes the scientific goals, objectives, instruments and mission architecture and design for a Flagship class mission to Venus. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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Linda R. Brown

Co-Authors: Pin Chen, Brian J. Drouin, Charles E. Miller, John Pearson, Stanley P. Sander, Keeyoon Sung, Robert A. Toth, ShanShan Yu
Laboratory Spectroscopy to Support Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Composition This paper discusses the declining state of laboratory studies that are essential to support and enable remote sensing of planetary bodies. Five recommendations are given to improve this situation. None of the above. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Dan Britt

Co-Authors: Paul Abell, Eleonora Ammannito, Erik Asphaug, MiMi Aung, Jim Bell, Julie Bellerose, Mehdi Benna, Lance Benner, David Blewett, William Bottke, Frank Brenker, Humberto Campins, Julie Castillo-Rogez, Andrew Cheng, Clark Chapman, Harold C. Connolly Jr., Maria Cristina De Sanctis, Richard Dissley, Dan Durda, Joshua Emery, Eugene Fahnestock, Yanga Fernandez, Michael J. Gaffey, Nader Haghighipour, Mark Hammergren, Paul Hardersen, Mihaly Horanyi, Ellen Howell, Robert Jedicke, Andrew Klesh, Steve Kortenkamp, Marc Kuchner, Stephen Larson, Dante Lauretta, Larry Lebofsky, Jian-Yang Li, Amy Lovell, Franck Marchis, Joseph Masiero, Lucy McFadden, Karen Meech, William Merline, Patrick Michel, Beatrice Mueller, David Nesvorny, Michael Nolan, Joseph Nuth, David O''Brien, William Owen, Vishnu Reddy, Joseph Riedel, Andrew Rivkin, Chris Russell, Daniel Scheeres, Michael Shepard, Mark V. Sykes, Paolo Tanga, Josep M. Trigo-Rodriguez, David Trilling, Ronald Vervack, Faith Vilas, James Walker, Benjamin Weiss, Hajime Yano, Eliot Young, Michael Zolensky
Small Bodies Community White Paper: Asteroids This paper identifies the top-level science issues, mission priorities, research and technology needs, and programmatic balance for the exploration of Asteroids. This paper was organized by the Small Bodies Assessment Group. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. University of Central Florida Download File

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Sarah E. Braden

Co-Authors: Samuel J. Lawrence, Mark S. Robinson, Bradley L. Jolliff, Julie D. Stopar, Lillian R. Ostrach, Lisa R. Gaddis, Justin J. Hagerty, Steven B. Simon, B. Ray Hawke
Unexplored Areas of the Moon: Nonmare Domes Analysis of samples returned from unexplored areas of lunar volcanism such as the Gruithuisen Domes will (1) increase our knowledge of the history of the Earth-Moon system, (2) advance theories of lunar magmatic evolution and (3) provide valuable points of comparison with other terrestrial planets. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Arizona State University Download File

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William F. Bottke

Co-Authors: Carlton Allen, Mahesh Anand, Nadine Barlow, Donald Bogard, Gwen Barnes, Clark Chapman, Barbara A. Cohen, Ian A. Crawford, Andrew Daga, Luke Dones, Dean Eppler, Vera Assis Fernandes, Bernard H. Foing, Lisa R. Gaddis, Jim N. Head, Fredrick P. Horz, Brad Jolliff, Christian Koeberl, Michelle Kirchoff, David Kring, Harold F., Levison, Simone Marchi, Charles Meyer, David A. Minton, Stephen J. Mojzsis, Clive Neal, Laurence E. Nyquist, David Nesvorny, Anne Peslier, Noah Petro, Carle Pieters, Jeff Plescia, Mark Robinson, Greg Schmidt, Sen. Harrison H. Schmitt, John Spray, Sarah Stewart-Mukhopadhyay, Timothy Swindle, Lawrence Taylor, Ross Taylor, Mark Wieczorek, Nicolle Zellner, Maria Zuber
Exploring the Bombardment History of the Moon We discuss our priorities for exploring the Moon''s bombardment history: (1) Test the idea of a massive impactor spike 3.8-4.0 billion years ago. (2) Anchor the early Earth-Moon impact flux curve by determining the age of South Pole-Aitken Basin. (3) Establish a precise absolute chronology. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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Alan P. Boss

Co-Authors: Edward Young, Victoria Meadows, Nader Haghighipour
Astrobiology Research Priorities for Exoplanets We recommend that the Decadal Survey place a high priority on continued, even expanded, support of the Research & Analysis programs that fund the efforts of exoplanet theorists, laboratory workers, and observers through NASA’s and NSF''s research programs. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington Download File

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Lars Borg

Co-Authors: Carl Allen, Dave Beaty, Karen Buxbaum, Joy Crisp, Dave Des Marais, Danny Glavin, Monica Grady, Ken Herkenhoff, Richard Mattingly, Scott McLennan, Denis Moura, John Mustard, Lisa Pratt, Steve Symes, Meenakshi Wadhwa
A Consensus Vision for Mars Sample Return A consensus vision of a Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission concept is presented, reflecting the integration of multiple recent community-based planning discussions. It summarizes the current state of thought regarding the science goals that would be best addressed by samples returned from Mars. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Lawrence Livermore National Lab Download File

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Reta F. Beebe

Co-Authors: Charles Acton, Raymond Arvidson, Jim Bell, Dan Boice, Scott Bolton, Steven Bougher, William Boynton, Daniel Britt, Marc Buie, Joseph Burns, Maria Teresa Capria, Angioletta Coradini, Daniel Crichton, Peter Ford, Richard French, Lisa Gaddis, Peter Gierasch, Randy Gladstone, Mitch Gordon, Ronald Greeley, Kenneth Hansen, Jakosky, Bruce, Yasumara Kasaba, Krishan Khurana, William Kurth, Emil Law, Ralph Lorenz, Conor Nixon, Chris Paranicus, Wayne Pryor, Thomas Roatsch, Chris Russell, Gerhard Schwehm, Richard Simpson, Mark Sykes, Dave Tholen, Raymond Walker, Paul Withers, Joseph Zender
Data Management, Preservation and the Future of PDS This paper summarizes the history, evolution and current status of analysis and archiving of planetary science data. It presents goals for PDS 2010, a revised PDS, and addresses conditions needed to achieve those goals. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. New Mexico State University Download File

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Patricia M. Beauchamp

Co-Authors: William McKinnon, Thomas Magner, Sami Asmar, Hunter Waite, Stephen Lichten, Ethiraj Venkatapathy, Tibor Balint, Athena Coustenis, Jeffrey L. Hall, Michelle Munk, Alberto Elfes, Kim Reh, John Elliott, Jonathan Rall, Richard Barney, Tom Spilker, Thomas J. Sutliff, Craig Williams, Andy Spry, David Atkinson, Subbarao Surampudi, Nathan Strange, Robert Preston, Wayne Zimmerman, Mark Hofstadter, James Cutts, John Clarke, Kevin Baines, Mohammad Mojarradi, Eric Pencil, Jason Barnes, Conor Nixon, Maria Teresa Capria, Vladimir B. Zivkovic, Anezina Solomonidou, Carrie Anderson, Julie Castillo, Karl Mitchell, Leonid Gurvits, David A. Williams, Javier Martin-Torres, Andrew Coates, Robert West, Rosaly Lopez, Michael Wright, Linda Spilker, Jonathan Lunine, Jason Soderblom, Bill Kurth, Christophe Sotin, Olivier Mousis, Ralf Jaumann, Nicholas Teanby, Edward Sittler, Frank Sohl, George Bampasidis, Valeria Cottini, Eric Wilson, Roger Yelle, Ralph Lorenz, Sushil Atreya, Francois Raulin, Patrick Irwin, Mathieu Hirtzig, Julian Nott, Lucy Norman, Murthy Gudipati, Véronique Vuitton, Rolant Thissen, Henry Throop, Kurt Klaus, Sebastien Rodriguez, Ingo Mueller-Wodarg, James N. Head, Don Banfield, Paul Mahaffy, Robert Brown, Marina Galand, Bonnie J. Buratti , Glen Orton, Jesse Beauchamp, Samuel Gulkis, John Brophy, Timothy A. Livengood, Louise Prockter, Mark A. Gurwell, Lorenzo Bruzzone, Ronald Greeley, Paolo Tortora, Robert Pappalado, Mimi Aung, Jesus Martinez-Frias, Jani Radebaugh, Jean-Pierre Lebreton David Senske, Alfred McEwen, Dirk Schulze-Makuch, Mark Smith, Dennis Matson, Matthew S. Tiscareno, Mathieu Choukroun, Elizabeth Turtle
Technologies for Outer Planet Missions: A Companion to the Outer Planet Assessment Group (OPAG) Strategic Exploration White Paper This is the final version of a white paper which provides the OPAG recommendations for technology required to undertake outer planetary missions. The paper describes the need for an OP technology program and provides specific recommendations for NASA investments during the next decade. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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William Bruce Banerdt

Co-Authors: Bruce Banerdt, Tilman Spohn, Ulli Christensen, Veronique Dehant, Linda Elkins-Tanton, Robert Grimm, Matthias Grott, Bob Haberle, Martin Knapmeyer, Philippe Lognonné, Franck Montmessin, Yosio Nakamura, Roger Phillips, Scot Rafkin, Peter Read, Gerald Schubert, Sue Smrekar, Mike Wilson
The Rationale for a Long-Lived Geophysical Network Mission to Mars We advocate the placement of a geophysical network on Mars to investigate the deep interior using seismic, heat flow, precision tracking and electromagnetic sounding measurements. These stations should also support meteorological atmospheric boundary layer experiments. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Olga Prieto Ballesteros

Co-Authors: Kevin P. Hand, Ariel Anbar, Felipe Gómez-Gómez, Oleg Korablev, Ralph Lorenz, Ralph Milliken, Daniel Prieur, Francois Raulin, Steve Vance, Michel Viso
Astrobiology in Europa and Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) This paper describe the Astrobiology science in EJSM and the opportunities of having in situ elements in future missions. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Centro de Astrobiología-INTA-CSIC Download File

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Tibor Balint

Co-Authors: James Cutts, Mark Bullock, James Garvin, Stephen Gorevan, Jeffery Hall, Peter Hughes, Gary Hunter, Satish Khanna, Elizabeth Kolawa, Viktor Kerzhanovich, Ethiraj Venkatapathy
Technologies for Future Venus Exploration This VEXAG community white paper covers both heritage, and key enhancing and enabling technologies, which are required for future Venus exploration missions in all three mission classes. It also argues for a targeted technology development program, including a large environmental test chamber. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Kevin H. Baines

Co-Authors: Sushil Atreya, Tibor Balint, David Crisp, David Grinspoon, Jeffery L. Hall, Gary W. Hunter, Sanjay Limaye, Viktor Kerzhanovich, Paul R. Mahaffy, Christopher T. Russell, David Senske, Stuart K. Stephens, Chris R. Webster
Venus Atmospheric Explorer New Frontiers Mission Concept A multiple-platform mission to Venus that includes a long-duration, circumnavigating balloon-based element, two drop sondes, and an orbiter, is described that directly addresses fundamental science iissues of planetary formation/evolution, dynamics/circulation, chemistry, meteorology, and geology. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Jeffrey L. Bada

Co-Authors: Andrew D. Aubrey, Frank J. Grunthaner, Michael Hecht, Richard Quinn, Richard Mathies, Aaron Zent, John H. Chalmers
Seeking Signs of Life on Mars: In Situ Investigations as Prerequisites to Sample Return Missions We argue for deployment of increasingly sophisticated in situ techniques to definitively identify biomarkers before engaging in Mars Sample Return. We focus on “following the nitrogen,” using techniques such as micro capillary electrophoresis to identify and determine the chirality of primary amines Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Scripps Institution of Oceanography Download File

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Dana Backman SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) and Planetary Science This paper consists of the intro & observatory capabilities (ch. 1) plus the planetary science (ch. 5) portions of the SOFIA Science Vision doc pub. in 2009 as an update of the scientific case for SOFIA. D. Backman produced this extract; the original doc is authored by the SOFIA Science Team. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. SOFIA / SETI Institute Download File

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David H. Atkinson

Co-Authors: Thomas R. Spilker, Linda Spilker, Tony Colaprete, Tibor Balint, Robert Frampton, Sushil Atreya, Athena Coustenis, Jeff Cuzzi, Kim Reh, Ethiraj Venkatapathy, Y. Alibert, N. K. Alonge, S. Asmar, G. Bampasidis, K.H. Baines, D. Banfield, J. Barnes, R. Beebe , B. Bezard, G. Bjoraker, B. Buffington, E. Chester, A. Christou, P. DeSai, M.W. Evans, L.N. Fletcher, J. Fortney, R. Gladstone, T. Guillot, M. Hedman, G. Herdrich, M. Hofstadter, A. Howard, R. Hueso, H. Hwang, A. Ingersoll, B. Kazeminejad, J.-P. Lebreton, M. Leese, R. Lorenz, P. Mahaffy, E. Martinez, B. Marty, J. Moses, O. Mousis, G. Orton, M. Patel, S. Pogrebenko, P. Read, S. Rodriguez, H. Salo, J. Schmidt, A. Sole, P. Steffes, P. Withers
Entry Probe Missions to the Giant Planets It is recommended that probe missions to the giant planets be performed to help constrain models of solar system formation and the origin and evolution of atmospheres, to provide a basis for comparative studies of the gas and ice giants, and to provide a valuable link to extrasolar planetary systems Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. University of Idaho Download File

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Sami W. Asmar

Co-Authors: Kaare Aksnes, Roberto Ambrosini, Aseel Anabtawi, John D. Anderson, John W. Armstrong, David Atkinson, Jean-Pierre Barriot, Bruno Bertotti, Bruce G. Bills, Michael Bird, Veronique Dehant, Peter Edenhofer, F. Michael Flasar, William Folkner, Richard G. French, Hideo Hanada, Bernd Häusler, David P. Hinson, Luciano Iess, Özgür Karatekin, Arvydas J. Kliore, Alex S. Konopliv, Frank Lemoine, Ivan Linscott, Essam Marouf, Jean-Charles Marty, Koji Matsumoto, Hirotomo Noda, Kamal Oudrhiri, Meegyeong Paik, Ryan S. Park, Martin Pätzold, Robert Preston, Nicole Rappaport, Pascal Rosenblatt, Richard A. Simpson, David E. Smith, Suzanne Smrekar, Paul G. Steffes, Silvia Tellmann, Paolo Tortora, G. Leonard Tyler, Tim Van Hoolst, Michael Watkins, James G. Williams, Paul Withers, Xiaoping Wu, Donald Yeomans, Dah-Ning Yuan, Maria T. Zuber
Planetary Radio Science: Investigations of Interiors, Surfaces, Atmospheres, Rings, and Environments Scientists utilize radio links between spacecraft and Earth or between spacecraft to examine changes in the phase/frequency, and amplitude of radio signals to investigate atmospheres and ionospheres, rings, surfaces, shapes, gravitational fields, and dynamics of solar system bodies. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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James W. Ashley

Co-Authors: M. D. Fries, G. R. Huss, J. E. Chappelow, M. P. Golombek, M. A. Velbel, S. W. Ruff, C. Schröder, W. H. Farrand, D. D. Durda, P. A. Bland, I. Fleischer, A. C. McAdam, S. P. Wright, A. T. Knudson, L. A. Leshin, and A. Steele
The Scientific Rationale for Studying Meteorites found on Other Worlds The ongoing identification of several meteorite candidates on Mars is ushering in a new discipline in the planetary sciences. We feel that cultivating an appreciation for the potential science return represented by meteoritic specimens on Mars and the Moon may be important for the 2013-2022 decade. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Mars Space Flight Facility, Arizona State University Download File

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Robert F. Arentz

Co-Author: Harold Reitsema
NEO Survey: An Efficient Search for Near-Earth Objects by an IR Observatory in a Venus like Orbit We present a conceptual design based on high-heritage flight systems from the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Kepler mission which will find 90% of all 140-meter NEOS in 7 years after launch, and by 2020, if started soon. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp. Download File

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Ariel D. Anbar

Co-Authors: David Grinspoon, Sean C. Solomon, G. Jeffrey Taylor
Astrobiology Research Priorities for Mercury, Venus, and the Moon This paper describes the value of exploration of Mercury, Venus and the Moon for the field of astrobiology and specifies high priority goals. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Arizona State University Download File

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Mark Allen

Co-Authors: Carrie Anderson, Andrew Coates, A. James Friedson, Murthy Gudipati, Kostas Kalogerakis, Ralph Lorenz, Jonathan Lunine, Catherine Neish, Conor Nixon, Lucy Norman
Astrobiological Research Priorities for Titan Titan, the haze-enshrouded moon of Saturn, has the largest accessible inventory of organic molecules in the Solar System outside of the Earth. The prospects are high for the formation of prebiotic compounds not unlike what might have preceded the origin of life in the early history of the Earth. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Charles Alcock

Co-Authors: Matthew Holman, Matthew Lehner, Stephen Murray, Pavlos Protopapas, Michael Werner
Whipple: Exploring the Solar System beyond Neptune Using a Survey for Occultations of Bright Stars Whipple is a Discovery class mission to explore the outer Solar System. A small telescope will compile lightcurves of ~40,000 stars sampled at 40 Hz. Small bodies from the Kuiper Belt to the Oort Cloud will occult targeted stars, revealing their distances, sizes, and abundances. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Download File

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Craig Agnor

Co-Authors: A. Barr, B. Bierhaus, D. Brain, B. Bills, W. Bottke, B. Buratti, S. Charnoz, J. Cho,A. Christou, G. Collins, J. Colwell, N. Cooper, L. Dones, M. Evans, R. French, A. Gulbis,, N. Haghighipour, D. Hamilton, C. Hansen,, A. Hendrix, D. Hurley, K. Jessup, M. Kirchoff, W. Kurth, H. Levison, M. Lewis, R. Lillis, Y. Ma, R. Malhotra, T. Michaels, M. Mickelson, W. Patterson, L. Prockter, D. Ragozzine, K. Rutherford, K. Sayanagi, P. Schenk, M. Summers, M. Tiscareno, K. Tsiganis, P. Zarka
The Exploration of Neptune and Triton Neptune and its captured moon Triton are unexplored with modern spacecraft instrumentation. Observations of these objects are urgently needed to address planet formation and the evolution of ice giant planets, icy satellites, Kuiper Belt Objects, and the solar system itself. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Queen Mary, University of London (United Kingdom) Download File

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Paul A. Abell

Co-Authors: Daniel Adamo, Thomas Jones, David Korsmeyer, Rob Landis
Scientific Investigation of Near-Earth Objects via the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle NASA has examined the feasibility of sending the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle to near-Earth objects during the next decade and beyond as part of its future Human Space Flight program. This paper describes the in-depth scientific investigations that could be accomplished by such missions. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Johnson Space Center / Planetary Science Institute Download File

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Mian. M. Abbas

Co-Authors: A.C. LeClair, D. Tankosic, D.L. Gallagher, R.B. Sheldon, E.A. West, J.C. Brasunas, D.E. Jennings
Global Distributions of Gas & Dust in the Lunar Atmosphere from Solar Infrared Absorption Measurements with a Fourier Transform Spectrometer Global Distributions of Dust & Gas in the Lunar Atmosphere may be determined most accurately with the highly sensitive technique of measurements of Solar IR Absorptions with a Infrared Spectrometer on a Lunar Orbiter, in full compliance with the NRC goal of measurements of Global Distributions. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Download File

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Mian M. Abbas

Co-Authors: A.C. LeClair, D. Tankosic, P.D. Craven, J.F. Spann, E.A. West
Importance of Measurements of Charging Properties of Individual Submicron Size Lunar Dust Grains It is absolutely necessary and of utmost importance to conduct the proposed measurements of charging properties of individual Apollo 11-17 submicron size dust grains by UV radiation and electron impact, at the lunar thermal cycle, for developing any believable lunar dust transportation models. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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