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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Robert Grimm Electromagnetic Sounding of Solid Planets and Satellites EM methods can sense subsurface structure from meters to a thousand kilometers. This white paper gives a tutorial on material sensitivities, exploration depths, sources, and particularly what measurements must be made for different target bodies, without specific mission endorsements. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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David Grinspoon

Co-Authors: Mark Bullock, James Kasting, Janet Luhmann, Peter Read, Scot Rafkin, Sanjay Limaye, Kevin McGouldrick, Gordon Chin, Samuel Gulkis, Feng Tian, Eric Chassefiere, Hakan Svedhem, Vikki Meadows
Comparative Planetary Climate Studies It is the purpose of this White Paper to draw attention to, and summarize, the important role that planetary exploration, and research with a comparative planetology focus, have played and should continue to play in our understanding of climate, and climate change, on Earth. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Denver Museum of Nature & Science Download File

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Eberhard Gruen

Co-Authors: Frank Postberg, Harald Krüger, Mihaly Horanyi, Elmar Jessberger Sascha Kempf, Ralf Srama, Thomas Stephan, Zoltan Sternovsky
In-Situ Mass Spectrometry of Atmosphereless Planetary Objects Dust particles emitted from atmosphereless planetary objects are samples of their surfaces. By mass analyzing these particles and tracing back their trajectories to their sources the surface composition of Mercury, planetary satellites, dusty rings sources, asteroids and comets can be obtained. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. LASP, University of Colorado Download File

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William Grundy

Co-Authors: W.B. McKinnon, E. Ammannito, M. Aung, J. Bellerose, F. Brenker, D. Blewett, J.C. Castillo, A.F. Cheng, M.C. De Sanctis, J.P. Emery, J.-Y. Li, C. Hansen-Koharcheck, M.J. Kuchner, A. Lovell, L.A. McFadden, W.J. Merline, K.S. Noll, C.B. Olkin, W.M. Owen, N. Pinilla-Alonso, D. Ragozzine, J.E. Riedel, A.S. Rivkin, C.T. Russell, J.A. Stansberry, M.V. Sykes, S.C. Tegler, A.J. Verbiscer, F. Vilas, H.A. Weaver, H. Yano, E.F. Young
Small Bodies Community White Paper: Exploration Strategy for the Ice Dwarf Planets 2013-2022 This paper identifies the top-level science issues, mission priorities, research and technology needs, and programmatic balance for the exploration of Dwarf Planets. This paper was organized by the Small Bodies Assessment Group. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Lowell Observatory Download File

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Murthy Gudipati

Co-Authors: Michael A''Hearn, Nancy Brickhouse, John Cowan, Paul Drake, Steven Federman, Gary Ferland, Adam Frank, Wick Haxton, Eric Herbst, Michael Mumma, Farid Salama, Daniel Wolf Savin, Lucy Ziurys
Laboratory Studies for Planetary Sciences The WGLA of the AAS promotes collaboration and exchange of knowledge between astronomy and planetary sciences and the laboratory sciences (physics, chemistry, and biology). Laboratory data needs of ongoing and next generation planetary science missions are carefully evaluated and recommended. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Jasper Halekas

Co-Authors: M. Fuller, I. Garrick-Bethell, L. L. Hood, C. L. Johnson, K. Lawrence, R. J. Lillis, R. P. Lin, M. Manga, M. E. Purucker, B. P. Weiss
Determining the origins of lunar remanent crustal magnetism The discovery of lunar magnetic fields of crustal origin was a major scientific surprise of the Apollo program. Solving the enigma of lunar remanent crustal magnetization will provide fundamental insights into the thermal history of the lunar core/dynamo, mantle, and crust, and into the processes by which crustal magnetization is acquired on airless bodies - for instance, large basin-forming impacts. Determining the origin and history of lunar crustal magnetism will require the return of oriented samples... Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. University of California Berkeley Download File

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Candice Hansen

Co-Authors: A.S.Aljabri, D.Banfield, E.B.Bierhaus, M.Brown, J.E.Colwell, M.Dougherty, A.R.Hendrix, A.Ingersoll, K.Khurana, D.Landau, A.McEwen, D.A.Paige, C.Paranicas, C.M.Satter, B.Schmidt, M.Showalter, L.J.Spilker, T.Spilker, J.Stansberry, N.Strange, M.Tiscareno
Neptune Science with Argo - A Voyage through the Outer Solar System Argo is an innovative pragmatic concept for a New Frontiers 4 mission which exploits an upcoming launch window that permits a close Triton encounter during a flyby through the Neptune system, and then continues on to a scientifically-selected Kuiper Belt Object. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Candice Hansen

Co-Authors: A.S.Aljabri, D.Banfield, E.B.Bierhaus, M.Brown, J.E.Colwell, M.Dougherty, A.R.Hendrix, H.Hussmann, K.Khurana, D.Landau, A.McEwen, D.A.Paige, C.Paranicas, C.M.Satter, B.Schmidt, M.Showalter, L.J.Spilker, T.Spilker, J.Stansberry, N.Strange, M.Tiscareno, Steve Vance
Triton science with Argo - A Voyage through the Outer Solar System Argo is an innovative pragmatic concept for a New Frontiers 4 mission to significantly expand our knowledge of the outer Solar System. It exploits an upcoming launch window that permits a close Triton encounter during a flyby through the Neptune system, and then continues on to a scientifically-sel Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Candice Hansen

Co-Authors: J.A. Stansberry, A.S. Aljabri, D. Banfield, E.B. Bierhaus, M. Brown, J. E. Colwell, M. Dougherty, A.R. Hendrix, K. Khurana, D. Landau, A. McEwen, D.A. Paige, C. Paranicas, C.M. Satter, B. Schmidt, M. Showalter, T. Spilker, L.J. Spilker, N. Strange, M. Tiscareno, W.M. Grundy, N. Haghighipour, K.S. Noll, E. Schaller, S. Sheppard
KBO Science with Argo - A Voyage through the Outer Solar System Argo is an innovative pragmatic concept for a New Frontiers 4 mission which exploits an upcoming launch window that permits a close Triton encounter during a flyby through the Neptune system, and then continues on to a scientifically-selected Kuiper Belt Object. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Walter Harris

Co-Authors: Walter Harris, Eric Burgh, John Clarke, Joshua Colwell, Michael Davis, Daniel Durda, Charles Hibbitts, Stephan McCandliss, Jeffrey Morgenthaler, Kurt Retherford, Ronald Vervack
Solar System Suborbital Research: A Vital Investment in the Scientific Techniques, Technology, and Investigators of Space Exploration in the 21st Century. Recent calls for increased NASA technology and training development cite shortages with current trends. Suborbital and Explorer missions are key this but have been cut in the past 20 years. Planetary research supports no small missions at all. We describe how suborbital research can address this gap None of the above. University of California, Davis Download File

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Samad A. Hayati

Co-Authors: Michelle Munk, Dick Powell, Bob Gershman, Ying Lin, Karen Buxbaum, Paul Backes, Steve Gorevan, Dave Stephenson, Dave Anderson, John Dankanich, Carl Allen, Don Pearson, Tom Rivellini, Issa Nesnas, Gary Bolotin, Charles Budney, Aron Wolf, Joseph Riedel
Strategic Technology Development for Future Mars Missions (2013-2022) This white paper focuses on enabling technologies for several candidate concepts for future Mars missions. These missions are described in MEPAG position white papers developed for the decadal survey. The technologies, their current status, and their approximate costs and schedules are described. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Michael Hecht

Co-Authors: Kathryn Fishbaugh, Shane Byrne, Ken Herkenhoff, Stephen Clifford, Timothy N. Titus, Oded Aharonson
Next Steps in Mars Polar Science: In Situ Subsurface Exploration of the North Polar Layered Deposits The polar regions of Mars represent a unique environment for determining the mechanisms of martian climate change over geological time. Using terrestrial paleoclimatology methods, subsurface access to the polar layer deposits should be a high priority for future Mars exploration. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Michael Hecht

Co-Authors: W. Thomas Pike, Walter Goetz, Morten Bo Madsen, Janice L. Bishop, Urs Staufer, Kjartan M. Kinch, Kristoffer Leer
The microstructure of the martian surface Martian soil is a microcosm of the mineralogical history of the planet, and it exerts a primary influence on atmospheric, geological, and periglacial properties. We propose an increased emphasis on microanalysis in future Mars surface exploration. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Charles A. Hibbitts

Co-Authors: James Bauer, Pietro Bernasconi, John Clarke, Deborah Domingue Josh Emery, Randy Gladstone, Tommy Greathouse, Gary Hansen, Walt Harris, Amanda Hendrix, Noam Izenberg, Carey Lisse, Larry Paxton, Jeff Percival, Kurt Retherford, Andy Rivkin, Mark Swain, Eliot Young
Stratospheric Balloon Missions for Planetary Science A Petition for the Formation of a Working Group to Study the Feasibility of a Facility Platform to Support Planetary Science Missions Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Laboratory Download File

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Robert Hodyss

Co-Authors: Paul D. Cooper, Reggie Hudson, Robert Carlson, Paul V. Johnson, Arthur L. Lane, Marla Moore, Louis J. Allamandola
Recommended Laboratory Studies in Support of Planetary Science: Surface Chemistry of Icy Bodies We identify several areas where an increased emphasis on laboratory activities would lead to a significant return in scientific results, based on an enhanced understanding of the fundamental surface chemistry of icy bodies. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Mark Hofstadter

Co-Authors: David Atkinson, Kevin Baines, Shawn Brooks, Imke de Pater, Leigh Fletcher, A. James Friedson, Mark Gurwell, Matthew Hedman, Brigette Hesman, Patrick Irwin, Sanjay Limaye, Steven Miller, Robert Moeller, Julianne Moses, Neil Murphy, Glenn Orton, Robert Pappalardo, Kathy Rages, Nicole Rappaport, Christophe Sotin, Linda Spilker, Thomas Spilker, Tom Stallard, Matthew Tiscareno, Elizabeth Turtle, Daniel Wenkert
The Case for a Uranus Orbiter This paper discusses some of the fundamental science that must be done at Uranus if we are to understand our Solar System and systems discovered around other stars. We suggest a Uranus Orbiter should be launched in the next decade. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Mark Hofstadter

Co-Authors: Don Banfield, Linda Brown, Thibault Cavalie, Imke de Pater, Scott Edgington, Leigh Fletcher, A. James Friedson, Daniel Gautier, Sam Gulkis, Mark Gurwell, Patrick Irwin, Erich Karkoschka, Jean-Pierre Lebreton, Julianne Moses, Glenn Orton, Kathy Rages, Peter Read, Adam P. Showman, Nicholas Teanby, P. Yanamandra-Fisher
The Atmospheres of the Ice Giants, Uranus and Neptune We believe many important atmospheric science questions can only be addressed by studies of the ice giants Uranus and Neptune. These questions relate to fundamental atmospheric processes that help us understand the formation, evolution, and current structure of all planets. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Steven Howe

Co-Authors: Brian Gross, Jeff Katalenich, Robert O’Brien, Logan Sailer
The Mars Hopper: Long Range Mobile Platform Powered by Martian In-Situ Resources The CSNR is designing an instrumented platform that can acquire detailed data at hundreds of locations during its 10 year lifetime - a Mars Hopper. By accumulating thermal power from a radioisotope source, the platform will be able to “hop” from one location to the next every 2-3 days with a separa Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Idaho National Laboratory Download File

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Terry Hurford

Co-Authors: B. Buratti, A. Coustenis, A. Dombard, R. Greenberg, H. Hussmann, M. Kirchoff, C. Porco, A. Rymer
The Case for an Enceladus New Frontiers Mission In this white paper, we will summarize one possible mission concept to explore Enceladus within a New Frontiers-level mission: to stay below the cost cap of $650M (FY09 dollars) and within the launch capability of the Atlas V 551. We imagine that there are other possible mission scenarios... Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Terry Hurford

Co-Authors: B. Buratti, A. Coustenis, A. Dombard, R. Greenberg, H. Hussmann, M. Kirchoff, C. Porco, A. Rymer, S. Vance, A. Verbiscer
The Case for Enceladus Science In this white paper, we will outline important science questions regarding Enceladus and show the link between these science questions and major themes of exploration as identified by NASA. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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