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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Arlin Crotts On Lunar Volatiles and Their Importance to Resource Utilization and Lunar Science We discuss recent, compelling evidence for major lunar volatiles not necessarily found in polar permanently-shadowed crater cold traps, but originating from the deep interior. We also discuss programs underway to study lunar volatiles, which unfortunately fall far short of the NRC''s SCEM goals. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Columbia University Download File

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Andrew Daga

Co-Authors: Carlton Allen, James Burke, Ian Crawford, Richard Leveille, Steven Simon, Lin Tze Tan
Lunar and Martian Lava Tube Exploration as Part of an Overall Scientific Survey This paper discusses the opportunity to search for and exploit lava tubes on the surfaces of the Moon and Mars as a means of enabling ambitious planetary science missions. [FINAL VERSION] Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Andrew Daga & Associates LLC Download File

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J.B. Dalton

Co-Authors: J.C. Castillo, L.R. Brown, R.P. Hodyss, P.V. Johnson, M. Gudipati, R.M. Mastrapa, K. McKeegan, R.N. Clark, P.H. Schultz, A.R. Hendrix, S.T. Stewart, S. Ruff, K.P. Hand, T. Spilker
Recommended Laboratory Studies in Support of Planetary Science Planetary science in the next decade will include major spacecraft missions to inner and outer solar system targets. Interpretation of these mission observations requires knowledge of fundamental physical and chemical properties of planetary materials. Much theoretical work at present depends upon r Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Andrew M. Davis

Co-Authors: Meenakshi Wadhwa, Christine Floss, Bradley L. Jolliff, Scott Messenger, Dimitri A. Papanastassiou, Allan Treiman, Andrew J. Westphal
Development of Capabilities and Instrumentation for Curation and Analysis of Returned Samples The purpose of this white paper is to emphasize the importance of investments in sample curation and analytical instrument development for the full realization of the science objectives of any sample return missions in the coming decade. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. University of Chicago Download File

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Eldar Z. Noe Dobrea

Co-Authors: S. Murchie, J.F. Mustard, J.L. Bishop, N.K. McKeown
Near-Infrared imaging spectroscopy of the surface of Mars at meter-scales to constrain the geological origin of hydrous alteration products, identify candidate sites and samples for future in-situ and sample return missions, and guide rover operations Near-infrared imaging spectrometers capable of mapping hydrous minerals on the surface of Mars at meter-scales from orbit, as well as hypespectral NIR imagers on landed rovers not only enhance the scientific return of orbital and rover missions, but will be critical in guiding future rover operation Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Planetary Science Institute Download File

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Charles D., Jr. Edwards

Co-Authors: William B. Banerdt, David W. Beaty, Leslie K. Tamppari, Richard W. Zurek
Relay Orbiters for Enhancing and Enabling Mars In Situ Exploration This white paper describes the role that orbital relay telecommunications have played as an integral part of science investigation of Mars, and the importance and continuing evolution for support to future missions. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Larry W. Esposito Mission Concept: Venus in situ Explorer (VISE) A proposed New Frontiers mission concept for Venus lander. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. LASP, University of Colorado Download File

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Ashley Espy

Co-Authors: Amara Graps, Nicolas Altobelli, Jürgen Blum, Don Brownlee, Humberto Campins, Sigrid Close, William Cooke, Stanley Dermott, Gerhard Drolshagen, Eberhard Grün, Doug Hamilton, Matthew Hedman, Mihaly Horányi, Peter Jenniskens, Thomas Kehoe, Steve Kortenkamp, Harald Krüger, Marc Kuchner, J.-C. Liou, Carey Lisse, Greg Madsen, Ingrid Mann, Brian May, Scott Messenger, Nicole Meyer-Vernet, David Nesvorny, Pasquale Palumbo, William Reach, Chris Russell, Ralf Srama, Mark Sykes, Josep Trigo-Rodríguez, Jeremie Vaubaillon, Harold Weaver, Hajime Yano, Michael Zolensky
Small Bodies Community White Paper: Interplanetary Dust This paper identifies the top-level science issues, mission priorities, research and technology needs, and programmatic balance for the exploration of Interplanetary Dust. This paper was organized by the Small Bodies Assessment Group. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. University of Florida, Southwest Research Institute Download File

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Jack D. Farmer

Co-Authors: Mark Allen, Tori Hoehler, Michael Mischna
Astrobiology Research and Technology Priorities for Mars This white paper provides a broad overview of the major science and technology drivers for the next decade of Mars exploration. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Arizona State University Download File

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W. M. Farrell

Co-Author: Mihaly Horanyi
The Lunar Dusty Exosphere: The Extreme Case of an Inner Planetary Atmosphere The Moon is an extreme type of atmosphere – a surface bounded exosphere – and may represent the final ‘ground state’ of any geologically dormant body. Neutral gas and dust are emitted from its surface via universal processes believed to be occurring at all near-airless bodies. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / University of Colorado Download File

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Yan Fernandez

Co-Authors: P. A. Abell, E. Ammannito, M. Aung, J. M. Bauer, J. Bellerose, H. Campins, J. Castillo-Rogez, A. F. Cheng, C. M. Dalle Ore, M. C. de Sanctis, J. P. Emery, T. Grav, W. M. Grundy, N. Haghighipour, M. J. Kuchner, J.-Y. Li, K. J. Meech, B. E. A. Mueller, K. S. Noll, C. B. Olkin, W. M. Owen, N. Pinilla-Alonso, D. Ragozzine, J. E. Riedel, E. L. Schaller, D. J. Scheeres, S. S. Sheppard, J. A. Stansberry, M. V. Sykes, J. M. Trigo-Rodríguez, D. E. Trilling, A. J. Verbiscer, H. A. Weaver, H. Yano, E. Young
Small Bodies Community White Paper: Goals and Priorities for the Study of Centaurs and Trans-Neptunian Objects in the Next Decade This paper identifies the top-level science issues, mission priorities, research and technology needs, and programmatic balance for the exploration of Centaurs and Small Irregular TNOs. This paper was organized by the Small Bodies Assessment Group. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. University of Central Florida Download File

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Leigh N. Fletcher

Co-Authors: G. Orton, T. Stallard, K. Baines, K. M. Sayanagi, F. J. Martin-Torres, M. Hofstadter, I. de Pater, S. Edgington, R. Morales-Juberias, T. Livengood, D. Huestis, P. Hartogh, D.H. Atkinson, J. Moses, M. Wong, U. Dyudina, A.J. Friedson, T.R. Spilker, R.T. Pappalardo, P.G.J. Irwin, N. Teanby, T. Cavalié, O. Mousis, A.P. Showman, X. Liu, M.B. Lystrup, S. Gulkis, T. Greathouse, R. K. Achterberg, G.L. Bjoraker, S.S. Limaye, P. Read, D. Gautier, D.S. Choi, T. Kostiuk, A.F. Nagy, D. Huestis, M. Choukroun, I. Muller-Wodarg, P. Yanamandra-Fisher
Jupiter Atmospheric Science in the Next Decade We outline atmospheric science goals and requirements for Jupiter in the next decade exploration (Juno, EJSM, Observatories, probes) in 5 themes: formation and evolution, weather-layer dynamics, coupling with the interior, interactions with the external environment and time-variable phenomena. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Jonathan J. Fortney

Co-Authors: Kevin Zahnle, Isabelle Baraffe, Adam Burrows, Sarah E. Dodson-Robinson, Gilles Chabrier, Tristan Guillot, Ravit Helled, Franck Hersant, William B. Hubbard, Jack J. Lissauer, Mark S. Marley
Planetary Formation and Evolution Revealed with a Saturn Entry Probe: The Importance of Noble Gases The determination of Saturn’s atmospheric noble gas abundances are critical to understanding the formation and evolution of Saturn, and giant planets in general. These measurements can only be performed with an entry probe. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. University of California, Santa Cruz Download File

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Friedemann T. Freund Previously Overlooked/Ignored Electronic Charge Carriers in Rocks I would like to draw the attention of members of the Decadal Survey Committee to a rather fundamental discovery, which (I believe) will have a major impact on the Earth and Planetary Sciences in the coming years. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. NASA Ames Research Center/ SETI Institute Download File

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Marc Fries

Co-Authors: John Armstrong, James Ashley, Luther Beegle, Timothy Jull, Glenn Sellar
Extralunar Materials in Lunar Regolith This paper describes the scientific rationale for locating and studying extralunar material found in lunar regolith. The extreme age and lack of weathering of lunar regolith make it a natural repository for samples from a wide range of parent bodies and across a vast span of solar system history. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Ian Garrick-Bethell

Co-Authors: Cassandra Runyon, Carle Pieters, Michael Wyatt, Peter Isaacson, Linda Elkins-Tanton
Ensuring United States Competitiveness in the 21st Century Global Economy with a Long-Term Lunar Exploration Program A focused Lunar Exploration Program can help retain United States economic and strategic leadership in the 21st century. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Brown University Download File

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James B. Garvin

Co-Authors: Lori S. Glaze, Sushil Atreya, Bruce Campbell, Don Campbell, Peter Ford, Walter Kiefer, Frank Lemoine, Greg Neumann, Roger Phillips, Keith Raney
Venus: Constraining Crustal Evolution from Orbit Via High-Resolution Geophysical and Geological Reconnaissance Major gaps in understanding Venus include how planetary-scale crustal resurfacing operated, the formation and evolution of highlands, and whether evidence of past environments is preserved. These questions can be addressed through an orbiting radar altimeter and high resolution SAR imager. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Barry Geldzahler

Co-Author: Les Deutsch
Future Plans for the Deep Space Network (DSN) NASA’s Deep Space Network (DSN) is a critical part of every NASA solar system mission, serving as the entity that ties the spacecraft back to Earth and providing data from science instruments, information for navigating across the solar system, and valuable radio link science and radar observations. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Headquarters Download File

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Jon D. Giorgini

Co-Authors: Lance A. M. Benner, Marina Brozovic, Michael W. Busch, Donald B. Campbell, Steven R. Chesley, Paul W. Chodas, Ellen Howell, Jean-Luc Margot, Andrea Milani Petr Pravec, Robert A. Preston, Maria-Eugenia Sansaturio, Daniel J. Scheeres, Michael K. Shepard, Arnold Silva, Martin A. Slade, Patrick A. Taylor, Giovanni Valsecchi, David Vokrouhlický, Donald K. Yeomans
Radar Astrometry of Small Bodies: Detection, Characterization, Trajectory Prediction, and Hazard Assessment Radar astrometry reduces trajectory uncertainties by orders of magnitude, thereby improving prediction, targeting, and impact probability estimates for small-bodies, while characterizing some at levels comparable to a spacecraft flyby. This improves resource use for ground and flight investigations. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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John Grant

Co-Authors: Matt Golombek, Alfred McEwen, Scott Murchie, Frank Seelos, John Mustard, David Des Marais, Ken Tanaka, Gian Ori, Nicolas Mangold, Kate Fishbaugh, Steve Ruff, Dawn Sumner, Brad Jolliff, Ralph Harvey
Future Mars Landing Site Selection Activities A process for identifying candidate landing sites for future missions should be started and accompanied by creation of funding to support landing site characterization activities. NASA should provide resources to existing missions to enable these activities and consider including instruments for sit Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Smithsonian Institution Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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Last Updated: 9 Apr 2012