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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Steve Vance

Co-Authors: Ariel Anbar, Donald D. Blankenship, Bonnie Buratti, Julie Castillo, Geoffrey C. Collins, James B. Dalton III, Jack Farmer, Eberhard Grun, Candice Hansen, Terry Hurford, Hauke Hussmann, Jeff Moore, Robert Pappalardo, Cynthia B. Phillips, Frank Postberg, Elizabeth Turtle, Robert Tyler
Icy Satellite Processes in the Solar System: A plurality of worlds A comprehensive strategy for Solar System exploration must identify processes common to icy worlds. Such an approach requires continued investment in discovery focused on icy satellites in the size regime 100 km and larger. We elaborate on this concept, giving specific examples and recommendations Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Ethiraj Venkatapathy

Co-Authors: Bernard Laub, Joseph L. Conley, Helen H. Hwang, James Arnold, Christine E. Szalai, Jim Tibaudo, Robert Knudsen, Andrew Chambers, David Atkinson, Sushil K. Atreva, Joseph M. Vellinga, William H. Willcockson, Janine M. Thornton, Nicholas G. Smith, Richard A. Hund, John Dec, Max L. Blosser, Michelle M. Munk, Robert Maddock, Prasun N. Desai, Walter Engelund, Stephen Sandford, David A. Gilman, Steven W. Gayle, John Kowal, Christopher B. Madden, Stan Bouslog, Brian J. Remark, Donald Curry, Scott Coughlin, Adam J. Amar, Kevin H. Baines, Tibor Balint, Bernard Bienstock, George T. Chen, James A. Cutts, Jeffery L. Hall, Samad A. Hayati, Pamela J. Hoffman, Linda Spilker, Romasso P. Rivellini, Robert Manning, Eric M. Slimko, Adam D. Steltzner, Thomas Spilker, Jeffrey Umland, Charles Kiskiras, Duane Baker, Thomas Foster, Dominic Calamito, James B. Garvin, Timothy A. Sauerwein, Sharon Seipel, Lori S. Glaze, Spencer Stolis, Mark Lippold, Francis Schwind, James Thompson, Raj Narayan, Thomas Andrews, Conley Thatcher, Edwin B. Curry, John McKinney, Robert Frampton, Todd Stever, Charley Bown, William Congdon, Jennifer Congdon, Daniel M. Empey, Joe Hartman, Dinesh Prabhu, Nancy L. Mangini, Kristina A. Skokova, Margaret M. Stackpoole, Tood White, Howard Goldstein, Melmoth Covington, Robin A. Beck, Carol W. Carroll, Charles A. Smith, Deepak Bose, Anthony Colaprete, David M. Driver, Edward Martinez, Donald T. Ellerby, Matthew J. Gasch, Aga M. Goodsell, James Reuther, Sylvia M. Johnson, Dean Kontinos, Mary Livingston, Michael J. Wright, Harry Partridge, George A. Raiche, Huy K. Tran, Kerry A. Trumble
Thermal Protection System Technologies for Enabling Future Mars/Titan Science Missions This paper describes currently available TPS technologies and identifies new technologies needed to support Mars missions in the 2013 - 2022 timeframe, drawing on past mission studies, recent Mars Technology workshop for Mars Sample Return Mission, and the Solar System Exploration road map. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos.Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Ethiraj Venkatapathy

Co-Authors: Christine E. Szalai, Bernard Laub, Helen H. Hwang, Joseph L. Conley, James Arnold, Jim Tibaudo, Robert Knudsen, Andrew Chambers, David Atkinson, Sushil K. Atreva, Joseph M. Vellinga, William H. Willcockson, Janine M. Thornton, Nicholas G. Smith, Richard A. Hund, John Dec, Max L. Blosser, Michelle M. Munk, Robert Maddock, Prasun N. Desai, Walter Engelund, Stephen Sandford, David A. Gilman, Steven W. Gayle, John Kowal, Christopher B. Madden, Stan Bouslog, Brian J. Remark, Donald Curry, Scott Coughlin, Adam J. Amar, Kevin H. Baines, Tibor Balint, Bernard Bienstock, George T. Chen, James A. Cutts, Jeffery L. Hall, Samad A. Hayati, Pamela J. Hoffman, Linda Spilker, Romasso P. Rivellini, Robert Manning, Eric M. Slimko, Adam D. Steltzner, Thomas Spilker, Jeffrey Umland, Charles Kiskiras, Duane Baker, Thomas Foster, Dominic Calamito, James B. Garvin, Timothy A. Sauerwein, Sharon Seipel, Lori S. Glaze, Spencer Stolis, Mark Lippold, Francis Schwind, James Thompson, Raj Narayan, Thomas Andrews, Conley Thatcher, Edwin B. Curry, John McKinney, Robert Frampton, Todd Stever, Charley Bown, William Congdon, Jennifer Congdon, Daniel M. Empey, Joe Hartman, Dinesh Prabhu, Nancy L. Mangini, Kristina A. Skokova, Margaret M. Stackpoole, Tood White, Howard Goldstein, Melmoth Covington, Robin A. Beck, Carol W. Carroll, Charles A. Smith, Deepak Bose, Anthony Colaprete, David M. Driver, Edward Martinez, Donald T. Ellerby, Matthew J. Gasch, Aga M. Goodsell, James Reuther, Sylvia M. Johnson, Dean Kontinos, Mary Livingston, Michael J. Wright, Harry Partridge, George A. Raiche, Huy K. Tran, Kerry A. Trumble
Thermal Protection System Technologies for Enabling Future Sample Return Missions Currently available TPS materials can meet the needs of Sample Return missions with entry velocity <13 km/s. For entry velocity >13 km/s, heritage carbon phenolic is fully capable, but potentially unavailable and currently available TPS will need to be qualified. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Ethiraj Venkatapathy

Co-Authors: James Arnold,Bernard Laub, Helen H. Hwang, Christine E. Szalai, Joseph L. Conley, Jim Tibaudo, Robert Knudsen, Andrew Chambers, David Atkinson, Sushil K. Atreva, Joseph M. Vellinga, William H. Willcockson, Janine M. Thornton, Nicholas G. Smith, Richard A. Hund, John Dec, Max L. Blosser, Michelle M. Munk, Robert Maddock, Prasun N. Desai, Walter Engelund, Stephen Sandford, David A. Gilman, Steven W. Gayle, John Kowal, Christopher B. Madden, Stan Bouslog, Brian J. Remark, Donald Curry, Scott Coughlin, Adam J. Amar, Kevin H. Baines, Tibor Balint, Bernard Bienstock, George T. Chen, James A. Cutts, Jeffery L. Hall, Samad A. Hayati, Pamela J. Hoffman, Linda Spilker, Romasso P. Rivellini, Robert Manning, Eric M. Slimko, Adam D. Steltzner, Thomas Spilker, Jeffrey Umland, Charles Kiskiras, Duane Baker, Thomas Foster, Dominic Calamito, James B. Garvin, Timothy A. Sauerwein, Sharon Seipel, Lori S. Glaze, Spencer Stolis, Mark Lippold, Francis Schwind, James Thompson, Raj Narayan, Thomas Andrews, Conley Thatcher, Edwin B. Curry, John McKinney, Robert Frampton,Todd Stever, Charley Bown, William Congdon, Jennifer Congdon, Daniel M. Empey, Joe Hartman, Dinesh Prabhu, Nancy L. Mangini, Kristina A. Skokova, Margaret M. Stackpoole, Tood White, Howard Goldstein, Melmoth Covington, Robin A. Beck, Carol W. Carroll, Charles A. Smith, Deepak Bose, Anthony Colaprete, David M. Driver, Edward Martinez, Donald T. Ellerby, Matthew J. Gasch, Aga M. Goodsell, James Reuther, Sylvia M. Johnson, Dean Kontinos, Mary Livingston, Michael J. Wright, Harry Partridge, George A. Raiche, Huy K. Tran, Kerry A. Trumble
Thermal Protection System Technologies for Enabling Future Outer Planet Missions This paper discusses the capability of heritage TPS technology used on the Galileo probe and new materials required for future outer planet probe missions. A prime conclusion is that there are important issues regarding the availability of the TPS required for Outer Planet entry probes. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Ethiraj Venkatapathy

Co-Authors: Helen H. Hwang, Bernard Laub, Joseph L. Conley, James Arnold, Christine E. Szalai, Jim Tibaudo, Robert Knudsen, Andrew Chambers, David Atkinson, Sushil K. Atreva, Joseph M. Vellinga, William H. Willcockson, Janine M. Thornton, Nicholas G. Smith, Richard A. Hund, John Dec,Max L. Blosser, Michelle M. Munk, Robert Maddock, Prasun N. Desai, Walter Engelund, Stephen Sandford, David A. Gilman, Steven W. Gayle, John Kowal, Christopher B. Madden, Stan Bouslog, Brian J. Remark, Donald Curry, Scott Coughlin, Adam J. Amar, Kevin H. Baines, Tibor Balint, Bernard Bienstock, George T. Chen, James A. Cutts, Jeffery L. Hall, Samad A. Hayati, Pamela J. Hoffman, Linda Spilker, Romasso P. Rivellini, Robert Manning, Eric M. Slimko, Adam D. Steltzner, Thomas Spilker, Jeffrey Umland, Charles Kiskiras, Duane Baker, Thomas Foster, Dominic Calamito, James B. Garvin, Timothy A. Sauerwein, Sharon Seipel, Lori S. Glaze, Spencer Stolis, Mark Lippold, Francis Schwind, James Thompson, Raj Narayan, Thomas Andrews, Conley Thatcher, Edwin B. Curry, John McKinney, Robert Frampton, Todd Stever, Charley Bown, William Congdon, Jennifer Congdon, Daniel M. Empey, Joe Hartman, Dinesh Prabhu, Nancy L. Mangini, Kristina A. Skokova, Margaret M. Stackpoole, Tood White, Howard Goldstein, Melmoth Covington, Robin A. Beck, Carol W. Carroll, Charles A. Smith, Deepak Bose, Anthony Colaprete, David M. Driver, Edward Martinez, Donald T. Ellerby, Matthew J. Gasch, Aga M. Goodsell, James Reuther, Sylvia M. Johnson, Dean Kontinos, Mary Livingston, Michael J. Wright, Harry Partridge, George A. Raiche, Huy K. Tran, Kerry A. Trumble
Thermal Protection System Technologies for Enabling Future Venus Exploration This paper discusses the capability of currently available TPS and the availability of heritage carbon phenolic used on the Pioneer-Venus probes. A prime conclusion is that there are important issues regarding the availability of the TPS required for future Venus entry probes. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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Janet A. Vertesi

Co-Authors: Robert Pappalardo, Claudia Alexander, William J. Clancey, Barbara Cohen, Paul Dourish, Jeffrey Johnson, Barbara Larsen, Kimberly Lichtenberg, Charlotte Linde, Scott Maxwell, Zara Mirmalek, Jeff Moore
Sociological Considerations for the Success of Planetary Exploration Missions Alongside scientific and technical considerations, the Planetary Science Decadal Survey should require that missions incorporate deeper consideration of the social science of spacecraft operations to maximize their missions’ scientific, technical and fiscal success. None of the above. University of California, Irvine Download File

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J. Hunter, Jr. Waite

Co-Authors: T. Brockwell, D.T. Young, W.S. Lewis, C.P. McKay, Francois Raulin, G. Schubert
Titan Lake Probe This White Paper describes the concept for a Titan Lake Probe, which could be implemented either as an element of a TSSM-type mission or as a stand-alone New Frontiers mission. The Lake Probe could be configured either as a boat or, for increased science return, as a submersible. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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James D. Walker

Co-Authors: Walter F. Huebner, Sidney Chocron, Walt Gray, Daniel Boice
Active Seismology of Asteroids through Impact and/or Blast Loading We have no direct data on the interior structure of primitive bodies. The interior structure of asteroids is relevant to most solar system formation and evolution theories. Seismology is the only method for determining the interior structure for a range of sizes of asteroids to address. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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Hal Weaver

Co-Authors: K. J. Meech, P. Abell, E. Ammannito, E. Asphaug, M. Aung, J. Bellerose, M. J. S. Belton, M. Benna, J. Blum, F. Brenker, D. Britt, D. Brownlee, B. Buratti, H. Campins, A. Cangahuala, J. Castillo-Rogez, A. Cochran, M. Combi, H. C. Connolly, Jr., N. Dello Russo, M. De Sanctis, M. DiSanti, R. Dissly, T. Farnham, L. Feaga, P. Feldman, Y. R. Fernández, E. Gruen, N. Haghighipour, W. M. Harris, C. Hergenrother, M. Horanyi, E. Howell, W. Irvine, M. Kueppers, E. Kuehrt, S. Larson, J.-Y. Li, C. M. Lisse, A. Lovell, K. Magee-Sauer, L. A. McFadden, J. P. Morgenthaler, B. E. A. Mueller, M. Nolan, J. Nuth, W. M. Owen, P. Palumbo, W. Reach, J. Riedel, N. Samarasinha, D. Scheeres, M. Sitko, M. V. Sykes, J. M. Trigo-Rodríguez, J. Veverka, R. Vervack, H. Yano, E. Young, M. Zolensky
Small Bodies Community White Paper: Goals and Priorities for the Study of Comets in the Next Decade (2011-2020) This paper identifies the top-level science issues, mission priorities, research and technology needs, and programmatic balance for the exploration of Comets. This paper was organized by the Small Bodies Assessment Group. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Johns Hopkins University/ Applied Physics Laboratory Download File

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Anthony Wesley

Co-Authors: Glenn Orton, Padma Yanamandra-Fisher, Leigh Fletcher, Kevin Baines, Christopher Go, Makenzie Lystrup, Olivier Mousis, Imke de Pater, Jean-Pierre Lebreton, Kunio Sayanagi, Timothy Livengood, Tom Stallard, Henrik Mellin, Nigel Bannister
Ground-Based Support for Solar-System Exploration: Continuous Coverage Visible Light Imaging of Solar System Objects from a Network of Ground-Based Observatories We propose that the needs of planetary science for event-detection and time-critical observations could be well-served by a global network of low-cost remote-controlled (or autonomous) telescopes optimized for high-resolution visible light imaging of solar system targets. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Acquerra Pty Ltd. Download File

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David A. Williams

Co-Authors: Jani Radebaugh, Rosaly M.C. Lopes, Imke de Pater, Nicholas M. Schneider, Frank Marchis, Julianne Moses, Ashley G. Davies, Jason Perry, Jeffrey S. Kargel, Laszlo P. Keszthelyi, Chris Paranicas, Alfred S. McEwen, Kandis Lea Jessup, David Goldstein, Melissa Bunte, Julie Rathbun, Melissa McGrath, Krishan Khurana, Sébastien Rodriguez, Terry A. Hurford, Amanda R. Hendrix, Michelle Kirchoff
Future Io Exploration for 2013-2022 and Beyond, Part 2: Recommendations for Missions This revised white paper lists our recommendations for mission concepts and instruments to accomplish the science objectives for future exploration of Jupiter''s moon Io for the decade of 2013-2022 and beyond. (Final version with additional coauthors). Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Arizona State University Download File

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David A. Williams

Co-Authors: Jani Radebaugh, Rosaly M.C. Lopes, Imke de Pater, Nicholas M. Schneider, Frank Marchis, Julianne Moses, Ashley G. Davies, Jason Perry, Jeffrey S. Kargel, Laszlo P. Keszthelyi, Chris Paranicas, Alfred S. McEwen, Kandis Lea Jessup, David Goldstein, Melissa Bunte, Julie Rathbun, Melissa McGrath, Krishan Khurana, Sébastien Rodriguez, Terry A. Hurford, Amanda R. Hendrix, Michelle Kirchoff, Elizabeth Turtle
Future Io Exploration for 2013-2022 and Beyond, Part 1: Justification and Science Objectives This white paper (revised draft) summarizes the current scientific questions regarding Jupiter''s volcanic moon Io, and the scientific objectives and measurements that need to be accomplished by future exploration. (Final version with additional coauthors). Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Arizona State University Download File

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James G. Williams

Co-Authors: James G. Williams, Slava G. Turyshev, Richard T. Baran, Kevin M. Birnbaum, Douglas Currie, William M. Folkner, Gary M. Gutt, Hideo Hanada, Hamid Hemmati, Stephen M. Merkowitz,, Kenneth L. Nordtvedt, Thomas W. Murphy, Jr., Jürgen Müller, Nicolas Rambaux, Peter J. Shelus, Ruwan Somawardhana, Robert Spero
Lunar Science and Lunar Laser Ranging Lunar Laser Ranging studies the Moon’s internal structure and properties by tracking the variations in the orientation and tidal distortion of the Moon as a function of time. Future missions to the Moon’s surface should include new laser ranging instrumentation capable of improved range accuracy. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Paul Withers

Co-Authors: Jared Espley, Rob Lillis, Dave Morgan, Laila Andersson, Mathieu Barthélemy, Stephen Bougher, David Brain, Stephen Brecht, Tom Cravens, Geoff Crowley, Justin Deighan, Scott England, Jeffrey Forbes, Matt Fillingim, Jane Fox, Markus Fraenz, Brian Gilchrist, Erika Harnett, Faridah Honary, Dana Hurley, Muffarah Jahangeer, Robert Johnson, Donald Kirchner, Francois Leblanc, Mark Lester, Michael Liemohn, Jean Lilensten, Janet Luhmann, Rickard Lundin, Anthony Mannucci, Susan McKenna-Lawlor, Michael Mendillo, Erling Nielsen, Martin Pätzold, Carol Paty, Kurt Retherford, Cyril Simon, James Slavin, Bob Strangeway, Roland Thissen, Feng Tian, Olivier Witasse
The ionosphere of Mars and its importance for climate evolution The ionosphere of Mars is a key part of the boundary between Mars and the solar wind. The MAVEN mission will improve our understanding of ionospheric properties and processes, including how they affect the escape to space of atmospheric species, but other important questions will remain unanswered. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Boston University Download File

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Michael H. Wong

Co-Authors: Máté Ádámkovics, Sushil K. Atreya, Don Banfield, Jim Bell, Susan Benecchi, Gordon Bjoraker, John R. Casani, John T. Clarke, Imke de Pater, Scott G. Edgington, Leigh N. Fletcher, Richard G. French, William Grundy, Amanda R. Hendrix, Erich Karkoschka, Jian-Yang Li, Franck Marchis, Melissa A. McGrath, William J. Merline, Julianne I. Moses, Keith Noll, Glenn S. Orton, Kathy A. Rages, Kurt Retherford, Kunio Sayanagi, Nick Schneider, Eric H. Smith, Lawrence A. Sromovsky, Nathan J. Strange, Anne Verbiscer, Padmavati A. Yanamandra-Fisher
A dedicated space observatory for time-domain solar system science The specific requirements for time-domain solar system science are adequate sampling rates and campaign durations. The observatory must be spaceborne both to satisfy the time-domain requirements as well as to maintain access to the dynamically significant ultraviolet spectral range. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. University of California Berkeley / STScI Download File

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Tsun-Yee Yan Yan

Co-Authors: K. Clark, R. Rasmussen
Radiation Facts and Mitigation Strategies for the JEO Mission The challenge associated with operating a spacecraft for long periods within the radiation belts of Jupiter cannot be underestimated. To realize the promise of incredible science the risk must be identified and controlled. Given the identified steps, the design is well in hand and would allow this s Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Roger Yelle

Co-Authors: S. Horst, M. Allen, R. Amils, S. K. Atreya G. Bampasidis, A. Bar-Nun, P. Beauchamp, M. Cabane, M. Capria, R. Carlson, N. Carrasco, A. Coates, J. Cooper, M. Combes, T. Cours, H. Cottin, A. Coustenis, T. Cravens, J. Cui, R. de Kok, I. dePater, M. Dobrijevic, G. Durry, Y. Dutil, O. Dutuit, M. Fulchignoni, M. Galand, Y. Gao, D. Gautier, M. Gurwell, E. Hebrard, F. Hersant, H. Imanaka; W. Ip, R. Jaumann, A. Jolly, S. Karoly, E. Kostiuk, L.-M. Lara, P. Lavvas, S. Lebonnois, J.- P. Lebreton, M. Leese, S. Le Mou_elic, T. Livengood, R. Lopes, J. Lopez-Moreno, J. Lunine, P. Mahaffy, V. Mangano, T. McCord, R. Modolo, A. Morse, O. Mousis, I. Muller-Wodarg, A. Mura, G. Murthy C. Nixon, D. Nna-Mvondo, L. Norman, G. Ortega, G. Orton, M. Patel, A. Pavlov, C. Plainaki, P. Rannou K. Reh, M. Rengel, F. Robb, S. Rodriguez, R. Rodrigo, E. Schaller, B. Schmitt, D. Schulze-Makuch, E. Sciamma O''Brien, J. Soderblom, A. Somogyi, E. Sittler, D. Strobel, L. Spilker, T. Spilker, M. Smith, A. Steele, K. Stephan, N. Strange, C. Szopa, R. Thissen, F. Tosi, D. Toublanc, M. Trainer S. Tripathi, S. Ulamec, S. Vinatier, V. Vuitton, J.-E. Wahlund, J. H. Waite, M. Yamauchi, J. Zarnecki
Prebiotic Atmospheric Chemistry on Titan Cassini measurements reveal that organic molecules with molecular weights of hundreds of amu are formed by photochemistry in Titan''s upper atmosphere. Investigating this chemistry is important for understanding the production of biological building blocks by naturally occurring processes. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. University of Arizona Download File

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Eliot F. Young

Co-Authors: Charles Hibbitts, Joshua Emery, Amanda Hendrix, William Merline, William Grundy, Kurt Retherford
Balloon-Borne Telescopes for Planetary Science: Imaging and Photometry This white paper advocates the use of balloon-borne telescopes for diffraction-limited imaging in visible wavelengths by demonstrating their technical readiness and low cost relative to space- and ground-based facilities. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Southwest Research Institute Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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