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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Michael D. Smith

Co-Authors: Mark Allen, Donald Banfield, Jeffrey Barnes, R. Todd Clancy, Philip James, James Kasting, Paul Wennberg, Daniel Winterhalter, Michael Wolff, Richard Zurek
Mars Trace Gas Mission: Scientific Goals and Measurement Objectives Trace gases are a sensitive indicator of current martian activity, whether photochemical or biogeochemical. A Trace Gas Mission measuring atmospheric composition, circulation and state, and locating active sources would characterize this activity and its implications for climate and astrobiology. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Sue Smrekar

Co-Author: Sanjay Limaye
Venus Exploration Goals, Objectives, Investigations, and Priorities This white paper describes the science priorities developed by the Venus Exploration Analysis Group, through a series of meetings with the Venus science community. The science themes for Venus are Origin and Evolution, Venus as a Terrestrial Planet, and Climate Change and the Future of Earth. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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George Sonneborn

Co-Authors: J. Lunine, R. Doyon, M. McCoughrean, M. Rieke
Study of Planetary Systems and Solar System Objects with JWST Determination of the physical and chemical properties of planetary systems is a key scientific goal of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). This white paper summarizes the mission’s capabilities in our solar system and extrasolar planetary systems. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Download File

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Linda Spilker

Co-Authors: Robert Pappalardo, Robert Mitchell, Michel Blanc, Robert Brown, Jeff Cuzzi, Michele Dougherty, Charles Elachi, Larry Esposito, Michael Flasar, Daniel Gautier, Tamas Gombosi, Donald Gurnett, Arvydas Kliore, Stamatios Krimigis, Jonathan Lunine, Tobias Owen, Carolyn Porco, Francois Raulin, Laurence Soderblom, Ralf Srama, Darrell Strobel, Hunter Waite, David Young
Cassini-Huygens Solstice Mission Understanding the Saturn system has been greatly enhanced by the Cassini-Huygens mission. The proposed 7-year Cassini Solstice Mission would address new questions that have arisen during the mission, and observe seasonal and temporal change in the Saturn system to prepare for future missions. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Linda J. Spilker

Co-Authors: C. J. Hansen, N. Albers, A. S. Aljabri, D. Banfield, E. B. Bierhaus, M. Brown, J. E. Colwell, C. Chavez, F. Crary, I. de Pater, M. Dougherty, C. Ferrari, G. Filacchione, R. French, M. Gordon, E. Gruen, M. Hedman, A. R. Hendrix, M. Horanyi, G. Hospodarsky, A. Ingersoll, Sasha Kempf, K. Khurana, B. Kurth, D. Landau, J. Lissauer, E. Marouf, A. McEwen, D. A. Paige, C. Paranicas, F. Postberg, N. Rappaport, H. Salo, C. M. Satter, B. Schmidt, M. Showalter, T. R. Spilker, J. Stansberry, N. Strange, M. S. Tiscareno, P. Yanamandra-Fisher
Neptune Ring Science with Argo - A Voyage through the Outer Solar System Argo, an innovative concept for a New Frontiers 4 mission, will yield significant advances in our understanding of evolutionary processes of rings and small bodies in the outer Solar System by executing a flyby through the Neptune system, then going on to a scientifically-selected KBO. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Andrew Steele

Co-Authors: Amundsen H.E.F., Benning L., Blake D., Borg L., Bower D.M., Brantley S., Brinkerhoff W., Cleaves J., Coates A., Cody G., Conrad P.G., Dieing T., Fogel M., Foing B., Fries M., Fritz J., Fsicher H., Glamoclija M., Garrett M., Glotch T., Hauber E., Hoffman H., Huntsberger T., Jaumann R., Johnson C., Karunatillake S., Kish A., Kress M., Hoehler T., McCollom T., McCubbin F.M., Ming D., Monaco L., Morrill P., Ohmoto H., Paar G., Pacros A., Pullan D., Robb F., Rull F., Sarrazin P., Schmitz N., Schoonen M.A.A., Schrenk M., Shahar A., Sherwood-Lollar B., Shirey S., Siljstrom S., Sims M., Smirnov A., Starke V., Toporski J.K.W., Vago, J., Wainwright N., Weishaupt K., Westall, F., Yonse, P., Zare R.N.
Astrobiology Sample Acquisition and Return This paper outlines an Astrobiology Sample Acquisition and Return mission based on the MEPAG Mid Range Rover concept mission for Mars exploration. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Carnegie Institution of Washington Download File

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Douglas Stetson

Co-Authors: Jim Bell, Lou Friedman
Mars Exploration 2016-2032: Rationale and Principles for a Strategic Program The Mars Exploration Program, one of the most visible and dynamic elements of NASA space science, is at a crossroads. To ensure a robust future it must embrace the related goals of life and sample return, and must begin to bridge the historical gap between robotic and human exploration. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. The Planetary Society (consultant) Download File

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Nathan J. Strange

Co-Authors: Daniel Scheeres, Ryan Russell, Kathleen Howell, James Longuski, Victoria Coverstone, David B. Spencer, Cesar Ocampo, Belinda Marchand, Terry Alfriend, John Junkins, Daniele Mortari, John Crassidis, Landis Markley, David Folta, John Dankanich, Shyam Bhaskaran, Dennis Byrnes, Kim Reh, Martin Lo, Jon Sims, John C. Smith, Brent Buffington, Anastassios Petropoulos, Damon Landau, Fernando Abilleira, Ryan Park, Jeffrey Parker, Julie Bellerose, Stefano Campagnola, Andrew Klesh, Nitin Arora, Diane Craig Davis, Kevin Kloster, Alfred Lynam, Geoff Wawrzyniak
Astrodynamics Research and Analysis Funding Funding for astrodynamics research has been largely limited to the development and operations phases of missions. Early funding for astrodynamics research would produce new techniques prior to formulation of missions, which could lead to novel and exciting concepts. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Tore Straume Solar Radiation Output: Reading the Record of Lunar Rocks Reconstructing solar energetic particle output by measuring signatures in lunar surface samples Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Ames Research Center Download File

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James T. Struck Some Anthropology of Humans in Space. Can Human Stability Provide Some Support for Non-Evolutionary or Religious Concepts? Are we able to Speak of a Homo-Astronomicus or a Human Group Involved in Space Travel? What Happens to Humans in Space? (ID-0135) Some anthropology of humans and space. I propose a relationship between religious artifacts and astronomical stability. I establish why calling humans in space a new species fits current species understandings and mention 2 other groups-slavery and sending objects a distance. Space effects raised. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. None of the above. A French American Museum of Chicago, Dinosaurs, Trees, Religion and Galaxies, Inc. Download File

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James T. Struck Nobel Prize in Physics and Chemistry Could Be Awarded to Almost Anyone Who Has Done Any work In fields Including me Almost anyone with work in chemistry and physics could be awarded the Nobel Prize; me too. Many contributions in chemistry and physics go on for several pages. The work of many are not recognized when the award is given to 1 or 2 people. Award could be given to any finding, article or discovery. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. None of the above. A French American Museum of Chicago, Dinosaurs, Trees, Religion and Galaxies, Inc. Download File

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David R. Thompson

Co-Authors: David R. Thompson, Robert C. Anderson, Benjamin Bornstein, Nathalie A. Cabrol, Steve Chien, Tara Estlin, Terry Fong, Robert Hogan, Ralph Lorenz, Daniel Gaines, Martha S. Gilmore, Mario Parente, Liam Pedersen, Ted L. Roush, Giuseppe Marzo, David Wettergreen
Onboard Science Data Analysis: Implications for Future Missions Onboard science data analysis enables new spacecraft operational modes that improve science yield. It can relieve constraints on time, bandwidth and power, and respond automatically to events on short time scales. We examine applications to rover, aerobot, and orbital platforms. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Matthew Tiscareno

Co-Authors: Nicole Albers, Todd Bradley, Shawn M. Brooks, Joseph A. Burns, Carlos Chavez, Joshua E. Colwell, Jeffrey N. Cuzzi, Imke de Pater, Luke Dones, Gianrico Filacchione, Silvia M. Giuliatti Winter, Mitchell K. Gordon, Eberhard Gruen, Douglas P. Hamilton, Matthew M. Hedman, Mihaly Horanyi, Harald Krueger, Jack J. Lissauer, Philip D. Nicholson, Robert T. Pappalardo, Frank Postberg, Mark R. Showalter, Frank Spahn, Linda J. Spilker, Joseph N. Spitale, Miodrag Sremcevic, Padma Yanamandra-Fisher, Gregory J. Black, André Brahic, Sébastien Charnoz, Richard H. Durisen, Michael W. Evans, Cecile Ferrari, Amara Graps, Sascha Kempf, Steven M. Larson, Mark C. Lewis, Essam A. Marouf, Colin J. Mitchell, Carl D. Murray, Cathy B. Olkin, Keiji Ohtsuki, Derek C. Richardson, Heikki Salo, Juergen Schmidt, David A. Seal, Ralf Srama, Glen R. Stewart, John W. Weiss
Rings Research in the Next Decade The study of planetary ring systems forms a key component of planetary science. We discuss priority activities for the next decade including full support for the Cassini Solstice Mission, a spacecraft mission to Neptune and/or Uranus, and support for Earth-based research activities. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Cornell University Download File

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Timothy N. Titus

Co-Authors: Thomas H. Prettyman, Timothy I. Michaels, Jeffrey Barnes, Hugh H. Kieffer, Adrian Brown, Shane Byrne, Kathryn E. Fishbaugh, Michael H. Hecht
Mars Polar Science for the Next Decade This white paper is intended to be a consensus of many of the active members of the Mars polar science community, and is the culmination of discussions held at the 3rd International Mars Polar Energy Balance and CO2 Cycle workshop (MPEB2009) held in Seattle, WA, 21-24 July 2009. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. United States Geological Survey Astrogeology Science Center Download File

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Alan Tokunaga

Co-Authors: S.J. Bus, J.T. Rayner, E.V. Tollestrup
The NASA Infrared Telescope Facility This white paper describes the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, its capabilities, and its role in current and future research in planetary astronomy. None of the above. University of Hawaii Download File

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Wesley A. Traub

Co-Authors: Charles Beichman, Ruslan Belikov, Geoff Bryden, Mark Clampin and William Danchi, Imke de Pater, Thomas Greene, Olivier Guyon, Sara Heap, John Johnson, Lisa Kaltenegger, Jeremy Kasdin, James Kasting, Douglas Lin, Jack Lissauer, Carey Lisse, Jonathan Lunine, Bruce Macintosh, Geoff Marcy, Mark Marley, Michael Meyer, Matt Mountain, Ben Oppenheimer, Glenn Orton, Marc Postman, Aki Roberge, Sara Seager, Eugene Serabyn and Christophe Sotin, Remi Soummer, Karl Stapelfeldt, John Trauger, Stephen Unwin, Michael Werner
Exoplanets and Solar System Exploration The purpose of this White Paper is to highlight areas of knowledge of our Solar System that will be important in interpreting future observations of exoplanets, especially giant exoplanets, and also how the diversity of exoplanets can inform our understanding of the Solar System. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Allan Treiman

Co-Authors: Meenakshi Wadhwa, Charles K. Shearer Jr., Glenn J. MacPherson, James J. Papike, Gerald J. Wasserburg, Christine Floss, Malcolm J. Rutherford, George J. Flynn, Dimitri Papanastassiou, Andrew Westphal, Clive Neal, John H. Jones, Ralph P. Harvey, Susanne Schwenzer
Groundbreaking Sample Return from Mars: The Next Giant Leap in Understanding the Red Planet The purpose of this white paper is to urge consideration of a groundbreaking sample return from Mars from a previously well characterized site that requires a simple mission architecture to minimize cost and engineering risk, while gaining substantial scientific return. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Lunar and Planetary Institute Download File

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Allan Treiman

Co-Authors: Meenakshi Wadhwa, Clive R. Neal, Charles K. Shearer, Bradley L. Jolliff, Lars E. Borg, Dimitri Papanastassiou, Malcolm J. Rutherford, Christine Floss, Andrew M. Davis, Steven Symes, Susanne Schwenzer, Mark D. Fries, Andrew Westphall, Barbara Cohen, David A. Kring
Sample Return from the Earth’s Moon This white paper makes the case that sample return from selected locations on the Moon in the coming decade will provide extraordinary advances in lunar and Solar System science. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Lunar and Planetary Institute Download File

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Allan H. Treiman Venus Geochemistry: Progress, Prospects, and Future Missions Report and recommendation of the February 2009 workshop of the same name. Inner Planets - Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Lunar and Planetary Institute Download File

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Peter Tsou

Co-Authors: Donald E. Brownlee, Isik Kanic, Christophe Sotin, Linda J. Spilker, Nathan Strange, Joseph Vellinga
Enceladus Flyby Sample Return, LIFE (Life Investigation For Enceladus) One of the most significant discoveries made by the Cassini Mission was finding water ice particles containing organic compounds in the plume emanating from the south pole of Enceladus. Several theories for the origin of life on Earth would also apply to Enceladus. Therefore, it should be of utmos Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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