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Decadal Survey Document Listing

Browse and search white papers and mission & technology studies received by the Planetary Science Decadal Survey. Click here for basic user instructions.

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Total results: 198

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Mian M. Abbas

Co-Authors: A.C. LeClair, D. Tankosic, P.D. Craven, J.F. Spann, E.A. West
Importance of Measurements of Charging Properties of Individual Submicron Size Lunar Dust Grains It is absolutely necessary and of utmost importance to conduct the proposed measurements of charging properties of individual Apollo 11-17 submicron size dust grains by UV radiation and electron impact, at the lunar thermal cycle, for developing any believable lunar dust transportation models. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Download File

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Mian. M. Abbas

Co-Authors: A.C. LeClair, D. Tankosic, D.L. Gallagher, R.B. Sheldon, E.A. West, J.C. Brasunas, D.E. Jennings
Global Distributions of Gas & Dust in the Lunar Atmosphere from Solar Infrared Absorption Measurements with a Fourier Transform Spectrometer Global Distributions of Dust & Gas in the Lunar Atmosphere may be determined most accurately with the highly sensitive technique of measurements of Solar IR Absorptions with a Infrared Spectrometer on a Lunar Orbiter, in full compliance with the NRC goal of measurements of Global Distributions. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Download File

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Paul A. Abell

Co-Authors: Daniel Adamo, Thomas Jones, David Korsmeyer, Rob Landis
Scientific Investigation of Near-Earth Objects via the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle NASA has examined the feasibility of sending the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle to near-Earth objects during the next decade and beyond as part of its future Human Space Flight program. This paper describes the in-depth scientific investigations that could be accomplished by such missions. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. NASA Johnson Space Center / Planetary Science Institute Download File

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Craig Agnor

Co-Authors: A. Barr, B. Bierhaus, D. Brain, B. Bills, W. Bottke, B. Buratti, S. Charnoz, J. Cho,A. Christou, G. Collins, J. Colwell, N. Cooper, L. Dones, M. Evans, R. French, A. Gulbis,, N. Haghighipour, D. Hamilton, C. Hansen,, A. Hendrix, D. Hurley, K. Jessup, M. Kirchoff, W. Kurth, H. Levison, M. Lewis, R. Lillis, Y. Ma, R. Malhotra, T. Michaels, M. Mickelson, W. Patterson, L. Prockter, D. Ragozzine, K. Rutherford, K. Sayanagi, P. Schenk, M. Summers, M. Tiscareno, K. Tsiganis, P. Zarka
The Exploration of Neptune and Triton Neptune and its captured moon Triton are unexplored with modern spacecraft instrumentation. Observations of these objects are urgently needed to address planet formation and the evolution of ice giant planets, icy satellites, Kuiper Belt Objects, and the solar system itself. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Queen Mary, University of London (United Kingdom) Download File

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Charles Alcock

Co-Authors: Matthew Holman, Matthew Lehner, Stephen Murray, Pavlos Protopapas, Michael Werner
Whipple: Exploring the Solar System beyond Neptune Using a Survey for Occultations of Bright Stars Whipple is a Discovery class mission to explore the outer Solar System. A small telescope will compile lightcurves of ~40,000 stars sampled at 40 Hz. Small bodies from the Kuiper Belt to the Oort Cloud will occult targeted stars, revealing their distances, sizes, and abundances. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Download File

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Mark Allen

Co-Authors: Carrie Anderson, Andrew Coates, A. James Friedson, Murthy Gudipati, Kostas Kalogerakis, Ralph Lorenz, Jonathan Lunine, Catherine Neish, Conor Nixon, Lucy Norman
Astrobiological Research Priorities for Titan Titan, the haze-enshrouded moon of Saturn, has the largest accessible inventory of organic molecules in the Solar System outside of the Earth. The prospects are high for the formation of prebiotic compounds not unlike what might have preceded the origin of life in the early history of the Earth. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Ariel D. Anbar

Co-Authors: David Grinspoon, Sean C. Solomon, G. Jeffrey Taylor
Astrobiology Research Priorities for Mercury, Venus, and the Moon This paper describes the value of exploration of Mercury, Venus and the Moon for the field of astrobiology and specifies high priority goals. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Arizona State University Download File

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Robert F. Arentz

Co-Author: Harold Reitsema
NEO Survey: An Efficient Search for Near-Earth Objects by an IR Observatory in a Venus like Orbit We present a conceptual design based on high-heritage flight systems from the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Kepler mission which will find 90% of all 140-meter NEOS in 7 years after launch, and by 2020, if started soon. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp. Download File

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James W. Ashley

Co-Authors: M. D. Fries, G. R. Huss, J. E. Chappelow, M. P. Golombek, M. A. Velbel, S. W. Ruff, C. Schröder, W. H. Farrand, D. D. Durda, P. A. Bland, I. Fleischer, A. C. McAdam, S. P. Wright, A. T. Knudson, L. A. Leshin, and A. Steele
The Scientific Rationale for Studying Meteorites found on Other Worlds The ongoing identification of several meteorite candidates on Mars is ushering in a new discipline in the planetary sciences. We feel that cultivating an appreciation for the potential science return represented by meteoritic specimens on Mars and the Moon may be important for the 2013-2022 decade. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Mars Space Flight Facility, Arizona State University Download File

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Sami W. Asmar

Co-Authors: Kaare Aksnes, Roberto Ambrosini, Aseel Anabtawi, John D. Anderson, John W. Armstrong, David Atkinson, Jean-Pierre Barriot, Bruno Bertotti, Bruce G. Bills, Michael Bird, Veronique Dehant, Peter Edenhofer, F. Michael Flasar, William Folkner, Richard G. French, Hideo Hanada, Bernd Häusler, David P. Hinson, Luciano Iess, Özgür Karatekin, Arvydas J. Kliore, Alex S. Konopliv, Frank Lemoine, Ivan Linscott, Essam Marouf, Jean-Charles Marty, Koji Matsumoto, Hirotomo Noda, Kamal Oudrhiri, Meegyeong Paik, Ryan S. Park, Martin Pätzold, Robert Preston, Nicole Rappaport, Pascal Rosenblatt, Richard A. Simpson, David E. Smith, Suzanne Smrekar, Paul G. Steffes, Silvia Tellmann, Paolo Tortora, G. Leonard Tyler, Tim Van Hoolst, Michael Watkins, James G. Williams, Paul Withers, Xiaoping Wu, Donald Yeomans, Dah-Ning Yuan, Maria T. Zuber
Planetary Radio Science: Investigations of Interiors, Surfaces, Atmospheres, Rings, and Environments Scientists utilize radio links between spacecraft and Earth or between spacecraft to examine changes in the phase/frequency, and amplitude of radio signals to investigate atmospheres and ionospheres, rings, surfaces, shapes, gravitational fields, and dynamics of solar system bodies. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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David H. Atkinson

Co-Authors: Thomas R. Spilker, Linda Spilker, Tony Colaprete, Tibor Balint, Robert Frampton, Sushil Atreya, Athena Coustenis, Jeff Cuzzi, Kim Reh, Ethiraj Venkatapathy, Y. Alibert, N. K. Alonge, S. Asmar, G. Bampasidis, K.H. Baines, D. Banfield, J. Barnes, R. Beebe , B. Bezard, G. Bjoraker, B. Buffington, E. Chester, A. Christou, P. DeSai, M.W. Evans, L.N. Fletcher, J. Fortney, R. Gladstone, T. Guillot, M. Hedman, G. Herdrich, M. Hofstadter, A. Howard, R. Hueso, H. Hwang, A. Ingersoll, B. Kazeminejad, J.-P. Lebreton, M. Leese, R. Lorenz, P. Mahaffy, E. Martinez, B. Marty, J. Moses, O. Mousis, G. Orton, M. Patel, S. Pogrebenko, P. Read, S. Rodriguez, H. Salo, J. Schmidt, A. Sole, P. Steffes, P. Withers
Entry Probe Missions to the Giant Planets It is recommended that probe missions to the giant planets be performed to help constrain models of solar system formation and the origin and evolution of atmospheres, to provide a basis for comparative studies of the gas and ice giants, and to provide a valuable link to extrasolar planetary systems Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. University of Idaho Download File

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Dana Backman SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) and Planetary Science This paper consists of the intro & observatory capabilities (ch. 1) plus the planetary science (ch. 5) portions of the SOFIA Science Vision doc pub. in 2009 as an update of the scientific case for SOFIA. D. Backman produced this extract; the original doc is authored by the SOFIA Science Team. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. SOFIA / SETI Institute Download File

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Jeffrey L. Bada

Co-Authors: Andrew D. Aubrey, Frank J. Grunthaner, Michael Hecht, Richard Quinn, Richard Mathies, Aaron Zent, John H. Chalmers
Seeking Signs of Life on Mars: In Situ Investigations as Prerequisites to Sample Return Missions We argue for deployment of increasingly sophisticated in situ techniques to definitively identify biomarkers before engaging in Mars Sample Return. We focus on “following the nitrogen,” using techniques such as micro capillary electrophoresis to identify and determine the chirality of primary amines Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Scripps Institution of Oceanography Download File

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Kevin H. Baines

Co-Authors: Sushil Atreya, Tibor Balint, David Crisp, David Grinspoon, Jeffery L. Hall, Gary W. Hunter, Sanjay Limaye, Viktor Kerzhanovich, Paul R. Mahaffy, Christopher T. Russell, David Senske, Stuart K. Stephens, Chris R. Webster
Venus Atmospheric Explorer New Frontiers Mission Concept A multiple-platform mission to Venus that includes a long-duration, circumnavigating balloon-based element, two drop sondes, and an orbiter, is described that directly addresses fundamental science iissues of planetary formation/evolution, dynamics/circulation, chemistry, meteorology, and geology. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Tibor Balint

Co-Authors: James Cutts, Mark Bullock, James Garvin, Stephen Gorevan, Jeffery Hall, Peter Hughes, Gary Hunter, Satish Khanna, Elizabeth Kolawa, Viktor Kerzhanovich, Ethiraj Venkatapathy
Technologies for Future Venus Exploration This VEXAG community white paper covers both heritage, and key enhancing and enabling technologies, which are required for future Venus exploration missions in all three mission classes. It also argues for a targeted technology development program, including a large environmental test chamber. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Olga Prieto Ballesteros

Co-Authors: Kevin P. Hand, Ariel Anbar, Felipe Gómez-Gómez, Oleg Korablev, Ralph Lorenz, Ralph Milliken, Daniel Prieur, Francois Raulin, Steve Vance, Michel Viso
Astrobiology in Europa and Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) This paper describe the Astrobiology science in EJSM and the opportunities of having in situ elements in future missions. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Centro de Astrobiología-INTA-CSIC Download File

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William Bruce Banerdt

Co-Authors: Bruce Banerdt, Tilman Spohn, Ulli Christensen, Veronique Dehant, Linda Elkins-Tanton, Robert Grimm, Matthias Grott, Bob Haberle, Martin Knapmeyer, Philippe Lognonné, Franck Montmessin, Yosio Nakamura, Roger Phillips, Scot Rafkin, Peter Read, Gerald Schubert, Sue Smrekar, Mike Wilson
The Rationale for a Long-Lived Geophysical Network Mission to Mars We advocate the placement of a geophysical network on Mars to investigate the deep interior using seismic, heat flow, precision tracking and electromagnetic sounding measurements. These stations should also support meteorological atmospheric boundary layer experiments. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Patricia M. Beauchamp

Co-Authors: William McKinnon, Thomas Magner, Sami Asmar, Hunter Waite, Stephen Lichten, Ethiraj Venkatapathy, Tibor Balint, Athena Coustenis, Jeffrey L. Hall, Michelle Munk, Alberto Elfes, Kim Reh, John Elliott, Jonathan Rall, Richard Barney, Tom Spilker, Thomas J. Sutliff, Craig Williams, Andy Spry, David Atkinson, Subbarao Surampudi, Nathan Strange, Robert Preston, Wayne Zimmerman, Mark Hofstadter, James Cutts, John Clarke, Kevin Baines, Mohammad Mojarradi, Eric Pencil, Jason Barnes, Conor Nixon, Maria Teresa Capria, Vladimir B. Zivkovic, Anezina Solomonidou, Carrie Anderson, Julie Castillo, Karl Mitchell, Leonid Gurvits, David A. Williams, Javier Martin-Torres, Andrew Coates, Robert West, Rosaly Lopez, Michael Wright, Linda Spilker, Jonathan Lunine, Jason Soderblom, Bill Kurth, Christophe Sotin, Olivier Mousis, Ralf Jaumann, Nicholas Teanby, Edward Sittler, Frank Sohl, George Bampasidis, Valeria Cottini, Eric Wilson, Roger Yelle, Ralph Lorenz, Sushil Atreya, Francois Raulin, Patrick Irwin, Mathieu Hirtzig, Julian Nott, Lucy Norman, Murthy Gudipati, Véronique Vuitton, Rolant Thissen, Henry Throop, Kurt Klaus, Sebastien Rodriguez, Ingo Mueller-Wodarg, James N. Head, Don Banfield, Paul Mahaffy, Robert Brown, Marina Galand, Bonnie J. Buratti , Glen Orton, Jesse Beauchamp, Samuel Gulkis, John Brophy, Timothy A. Livengood, Louise Prockter, Mark A. Gurwell, Lorenzo Bruzzone, Ronald Greeley, Paolo Tortora, Robert Pappalado, Mimi Aung, Jesus Martinez-Frias, Jani Radebaugh, Jean-Pierre Lebreton David Senske, Alfred McEwen, Dirk Schulze-Makuch, Mark Smith, Dennis Matson, Matthew S. Tiscareno, Mathieu Choukroun, Elizabeth Turtle
Technologies for Outer Planet Missions: A Companion to the Outer Planet Assessment Group (OPAG) Strategic Exploration White Paper This is the final version of a white paper which provides the OPAG recommendations for technology required to undertake outer planetary missions. The paper describes the need for an OP technology program and provides specific recommendations for NASA investments during the next decade. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Jet Propulsion Laboratory Download File

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Reta F. Beebe

Co-Authors: Charles Acton, Raymond Arvidson, Jim Bell, Dan Boice, Scott Bolton, Steven Bougher, William Boynton, Daniel Britt, Marc Buie, Joseph Burns, Maria Teresa Capria, Angioletta Coradini, Daniel Crichton, Peter Ford, Richard French, Lisa Gaddis, Peter Gierasch, Randy Gladstone, Mitch Gordon, Ronald Greeley, Kenneth Hansen, Jakosky, Bruce, Yasumara Kasaba, Krishan Khurana, William Kurth, Emil Law, Ralph Lorenz, Conor Nixon, Chris Paranicus, Wayne Pryor, Thomas Roatsch, Chris Russell, Gerhard Schwehm, Richard Simpson, Mark Sykes, Dave Tholen, Raymond Walker, Paul Withers, Joseph Zender
Data Management, Preservation and the Future of PDS This paper summarizes the history, evolution and current status of analysis and archiving of planetary science data. It presents goals for PDS 2010, a revised PDS, and addresses conditions needed to achieve those goals. Inner Planets: Mercury, Venus, and the Moon. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Giant Planets: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and exoplanets, including rings and magnetic fields, but not their satellites. Satellites: Galilean satellites, Titan, and the other satellites of the giant planets. Primitive Bodies: Asteroids, comets, Phobos, Deimos, Pluto/Charon and other Kuiper belt objects, meteorites, and interplanetary dust. New Mexico State University Download File

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Lars Borg

Co-Authors: Carl Allen, Dave Beaty, Karen Buxbaum, Joy Crisp, Dave Des Marais, Danny Glavin, Monica Grady, Ken Herkenhoff, Richard Mattingly, Scott McLennan, Denis Moura, John Mustard, Lisa Pratt, Steve Symes, Meenakshi Wadhwa
A Consensus Vision for Mars Sample Return A consensus vision of a Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission concept is presented, reflecting the integration of multiple recent community-based planning discussions. It summarizes the current state of thought regarding the science goals that would be best addressed by samples returned from Mars. Mars: Not Phobos and Deimos. Lawrence Livermore National Lab Download File

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These documents have been prepared in coordination with the National Academies of Science in support of the National Academies Planetary Science Decadal Survey. These documents are being made available for information purposes only, and any views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of NASA, JPL, or the California Institute of Technology.

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